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      • The Phrygian language (/ ˈfrɪdʒiən /) was the Indo-European language of the Phrygians, spoken in Anatolia, present-day Turkey, during Classical Antiquity (c. 8th century BC to 5th century AD). Phrygian is considered by some linguists to have been closely related to Greek.
      www.wikizero.com/en/Phrygian_language
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  2. Phrygian language - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phrygian_language

    The Phrygian language (/ ˈ f r ɪ dʒ i ə n /) was the Indo-European language of the Phrygians, spoken in Anatolia (modern Turkey), during classical antiquity (c. 8th century BC to 5th century AD). Plato observed that some Phrygian words resembled Greek ones. [4]

  3. Phrygia - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phrygia

    Phrygia; Ancient Kingdom of Anatolia: Location: Central Anatolia: Language: Phrygian: State existed: Dominant kingdom in Asia Minor from c. 1200–700 BC: Capital: Gordium: Persian satrapy: Hellespontine Phrygia, Greater Phrygia: Roman province: Galatia, Asia

    • Dominant kingdom in Asia Minor from c. 1200–700 BC
    • Phrygian
  4. Talk:Phrygian language - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Talk:Phrygian_language

    Phrygian is an Indo-European language and even though we have limited vocabulary about it, it is perfect for demonstrating its relation with other IE languages.Fkitselis 21:12, 1 March 2012 (UTC) External links modified. Hello fellow Wikipedians, I have just modified one external link on Phrygian language.

  5. The Phrygian language (/ˈfrɪdʒiən/) was the Indo-European language of the Phrygians, spoken in Anatolia (modern Turkey), during classical antiquity (c. 8th century BC to 5th century AD).

  6. Thracian language - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thracian_language

    The Thracian language in linguistic textbooks is usually treated either as its own branch of Indo-European, or is grouped with Dacian, together forming a Daco-Thracian branch of IE. Older textbooks often grouped it also with Illyrian or Phrygian. The belief that Thracian was close to Phrygian is no longer popular and has mostly been discarded.

  7. Ancient Macedonian language - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ancient_Macedonian_language

    An Indo-European language that is a close cousin to Attic Greek and also related to Thracian and Phrygian languages, suggested by A. Meillet (1913) and I. I. Russu (1938), or part of a Sprachbund encompassing Thracian, Illyrian and Greek (Kretschmer 1896, E. Schwyzer 1959).

  8. Montanism - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Montanism

    Montanism originated in Phrygia, a province of Anatolia, and flourished throughout the region, leading to the movement being referred to elsewhere as Cataphrygian (meaning it was "from Phrygia") or simply as Phrygian. They were sometimes also called Pepuzians after Pepuza, their new Jerusalem.

  9. The Phrygian language ( / ˈfrɪdʒiən /) was the Indo-European language of the Phrygians, spoken in Asia Minor during Classical Antiquity (c. 8th century BC to 5th century AD). Phrygian is considered by some linguists to have been closely related to Greek and/or Armenian. The similarity of some Phrygian words to Greek ones was observed by Plato in his Cratylus (410a).

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