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  1. Pipe organ - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pipe_organ

    The pipe organ is a musical instrument that produces sound by driving pressurized air (called wind) through the organ pipes selected from a keyboard.Because each pipe produces a single pitch, the pipes are provided in sets called ranks, each of which has a common timbre and volume throughout the keyboard compass.

  2. Organ pipe - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Organ_pipe

    Wood and metal pipes of a variety of sizes are shown in this photograph. An organ pipe is a sound-producing element of the pipe organ that resonates at a specific pitch when pressurized air (commonly referred to as wind) is driven through it. Each pipe is tuned to a specific note of the musical scale.

  3. List of pipe organs - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_pipe_organs

    The largest pipe organ ever built, based on number of pipes, is the Boardwalk Hall Auditorium Organ in Atlantic City, New Jersey, built by the Midmer-Losh Organ Company between 1929 and 1932. The organ contains seven manuals, 449 ranks, 337 registers, and 33,114 pipes. It weighs approximately 150 tons.

  4. From Simple English Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Organ in Katharinenkirche, Frankfurt am Main, Germany The pipe organ is a keyboard instrument in which the sound is made by air blowing through pipes. A person who plays the organ is called an organist.

  5. List of pipe organ builders - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_pipe_organ_builders

    Pipe Organ Preservation Co. (1999–present) – Belfast; Pipe Organ Services Ltd. (c.1985–present)- formerly Salisbury, and since 1996 Saxby, Melton Mowbray. Positive Organ Company Ltd (2020–present) - Brackley, Northamptonshire; Principal Pipe Organs (1983–present) – York, North Yorkshire

  6. Pipe organ - Wikipedia

    sco.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pipe_organ

    Frae Wikipedia, the free beuk o knawledge The pipe organ in Saint-Germain l'Auxerrois, Paris The pipe organ is a muisical instrument that produces soond bi drivin pressurised air (cried wind) throu organ pipes selectit via a keybuird.

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  8. The pipe organ is a musical instrument that produces sound by driving pressurized air (called wind) through the organ pipes selected via a keyboard. Because each pipe produces a single pitch, the pipes are provided in sets called ranks, each of which has a common timbre and volume throughout the keyboard compass.

  9. Pipe organ tuning - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pipe_organ_tuning

    Miscellaneous. Organ pipes are so sensitive to temperature that the body heat of the organ tuner can affect the tuning. If one holds a small metal flue pipe briefly in one's hand and then returns it to the chest, its pitch (relative to a tuning reference) can be heard to change as the pipe returns to room temperature.

  10. Organ (music) - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Organ_(music)
    • Overview
    • History
    • Pipe organs
    • Non-piped organs
    • Other organ types
    • Organ music

    In music, the organ is a keyboard instrument of one or more pipe divisions or other means for producing tones, each played with its own keyboard, played either with the hands on a keyboard or with the feet using pedals.

    The organ is a relatively old musical instrument, dating from the time of Ctesibius of Alexandria, who invented the water organ. It was played throughout the Ancient Greek and Ancient Roman world, particularly during races and games. During the early medieval period it spread fro

    Pipe organs use air moving through pipes to produce sounds. Since the 16th century, pipe organs have used various materials for pipes, which can vary widely in timbre and volume. Increasingly hybrid organs are appearing in which pipes are augmented with electric additions. Great

    Most organs in Europe, the Americas, and Australasia can be found in Christian churches. The introduction of church organs is traditionally attributed to Pope Vitalian in the 7th century. Due to its simultaneous ability to provide a musical foundation below the vocal register, su

    In the late 19th century and early 20th century, symphonic organs flourished in secular venues in the United States and the United Kingdom, designed to replace symphony orchestras by playing transcriptions of orchestral pieces. Symphonic and orchestral organs largely fell out of

    The theatre organ or cinema organ was designed to accompany silent movies. Like a symphonic organ, it is made to replace an orchestra. However, it includes many more gadgets, such as mechanical percussion accessories and other imitative sounds useful in creating movie sound accom

    The pump organ, reed organ or harmonium, was the other main type of organ before the development of the electronic organ. It generated its sounds using reeds similar to those of an accordion. Smaller, cheaper and more portable than the corresponding pipe instrument, these were wi

    The wind can also be created by using pressurized steam instead of air. The steam organ, or calliope, was invented in the United States in the 19th century. Calliopes usually have very loud and clean sound. Calliopes are used as outdoors instruments, and many have been built on w

    The organ has had an important place in classical music, particularly since the 16th century. Spain's Antonio de Cabezón, the Netherlands' Jan Pieterszoon Sweelinck, and Italy's Girolamo Frescobaldi were three of the most important organist-composers before 1650. Influenced ...

    Electronic organs and electromechanical organs such as the Hammond organ have an established role in a number of popular-music genres, such as blues, jazz, gospel, and 1960s and 1970s rock music. Electronic and electromechanical organs were originally designed as lower-cost subst

    Performers of 20th century popular organ music include William Rowland who composed "Piano Rags"; George Wright and Virgil Fox, who bridged both the classical and religious areas of music.

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