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  1. en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Thimble_TheatrePopeye - Wikipedia

    Popeye the Sailor Man is a fictional cartoon character created by Elzie Crisler Segar. The character first appeared in the daily King Features comic strip Thimble Theatre on January 17, 1929, and Popeye became the strip's title in later years. The character has also appeared in theatrical and television animated cartoons.

    • Daily Strips
    • Sunday Strips
    • External Links

    Stories created by Segar

    1919-1928 Thimble Theatre began as a daily series of multi-panel gags, at first parodying theatrical films. By the time of Popeye's introduction, however, it had evolved into a serialized humor/adventure comic strip. 1922 1. 07/31/1922 - 10/10/1922 "Great Gobs of Gold" 2. 10/11/1922 - 10/25/1922 (Ham Gravy, moving picture tycoon) 3. 11/06/1922 - 11/17/1922 (The cave man) 4. 11/22/1922 - 02/21/1923 (More gobs of gold) 1923 1. (Blizzard the Fighting Bird) 1928 1. 09/10/1928 - 06/27/1929 (Dice I...

    Post-Segar stories

    1938-1939 Sims and Winner did two complete adventures as a team and began a third, before Winner left in late 1939. 1938 1. 12/12/1938 - 03/25/1939 "Spinach Juice Springs" 1939 1. 03/27/1939 - 08/12/1939 "Homeward Bound" 2. 08/14/1939 - 02/10/1940 "The Rainbird" 1939-1954 Bela Zabolytook over the art duties in December, 1939, and completed "The Rainbird". The Sims/Zaboly team would maintain Segar's practice of developing longer adventures. 1940 1. 02/12/1940 - 04/20/1940 "The Roving Champion"...

    Sundays serialized their own stories in parallel to the daily strip, and also alternated these storylines with standalone gags. 1925-1928 Segar's Sunday pages began as a series of unrelated multi-panel gag strips. While he eventually drew stories or related gags spanning several weeks, the longer adventures did not start until 1928. 1928 1. "The Great American Desert Saga" 1.1. Castor Oyl and Ham Gravy travel to the American West to seek their fortune. This story lasts from March 1928 to March 1930. Popeye would not debut until January 1929, and he does not appear in this story. 1930 1. (Popeye, prize-fighter) 2. (Popeye, boxing instructor) 3. (Popeye, prize-fighter again) 1931 1. "Popeye, the S'Prise Fighter" 2. (Popeye fights against Tinearo) 3. (Popeye fights against a gorilla) 1. 1.1. Popeye is chosen to resolve the matter of who would win in a fight, a gorilla or the strongest man. 1. "The Johnny Brawn Fight" 1932 1. (Popeye fights against a robot) 2. "Orphan Mary Ann" 1. 1.1....

    Popeye comic strips at Comics Kingdom (Dailies are Sagendorf reruns; Sundays by Hy Eisman; complete archive available via premium membership)
    Thimble Theatre comic strips at Comics Kingdom(Classic strips by Segar; complete archive available via premium membership)
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  3. Thimble Theatre; Popeye comic books; Theatrical shorts; Popeye the Sailor (TV series) ... Characters and elements from the comic strip series Trending pages. Popeye ...

  4. Thimble Theatre (1919–1966), also titled Thimble Theatre starring Popeye, by E. C. Segar (US) Things to Come (1942–1954) by Hank Barrow and later Jim Bresnan This and That (1945–1958) by various, including Henry Boltinoff

    • History
    • Characters
    • Differences from The Cartoons

    The strip first appeared in the New York Journal, a newspaper operated by King Features owner William Randolph Hearst, on December 19th, 1919 before later expanding into more papers. In its early years, the strip featured characters acting out various stories and scenarios in theatrical style. Thimble Theatre's first main characters were the thin Olive Oyl and her boyfriend, Harold Hamgravy. After a while the comic began moving towards a comedic adventure style featuring Olive, Ham Gravy, and Olive's enterprising brother, Castor Oyl. Olive's parents, Cole and nanna oyl, also made frequent appearances. Popeye first appeared in the strip on January 17, 1929 as a minor character. He was initially hired by Castor Oyl and Ham to crew a ship for a voyage to Dice Island, the location of a casino owned by the crooked gambler Fadewell. Castor intended to break the bank at the casino using the unbeatable good luck conferred by stroking the hairs on the head of Bernice the Whiffle Hen. Weeks l...

    The Popeye character became so popular that he was given a larger role, and the strip was expanded into many more newspapers as a result. Though initial strips presented Olive Oyl as being less than impressed with Popeye, she eventually left Ham Gravy to become Popeye's girlfriend-and Ham Gravy left the strip as a regular. Over the years, however, she has often displayed a fickle attitude towards the sailor. Castor Oyl continued to come up with get-rich-quick schemes and enlisted Popeye in his misadventures. Eventually he settled down as a detective and later on bought a ranchout West. Castor has seldom appeared in recent years. In 1933, Popeye received a foundling baby in the mail, whom he adopted and named "Swee'Pea." Other regular characters in the strip were J. Wellington Wimpy, a hamburger loving moocher who would "gladly pay you Tuesday for a hamburger today"; George W. Geezil, a local cobbler who spoke in a heavily affected accent and habitually attempted to murder or wish de...

    Segar's strip was quite different from the cartoons that followed. The stories were more complex, with many characters who never appeared in the cartoons. Spinach usage was rare and Blutomade only one appearance. Segar would sign some of his early Popeye comic strips with a cigar, due to his last name being a homonym of "cigar".

    • Fictional Character and Story
    • Thimble Theatre and Popeye Comic Strips
    • Comic Books
    • Cultural Origins and Impact
    • Thimble Theatre/Popeye Characters
    • References
    • External Links

    Differences in Popeye's story and characterization vary depending on the medium. While Swee'Pea is definitively Popeye's ward in the comic strips, he is often depicted as belonging to Olive Oylin cartoons. The cartoons also occasionally feature members of Popeye's family who have never appeared in the strip, notably his lookalike nephews Peepeye, Pupeye, Pipeye and Poopeye. Even though there is no absolute sense of continuity in the stories, certain plot and presentation elements remain mostly constant, including purposeful contradictions in Popeye's capabilities. Though at times he seems bereft of manners or uneducated, Popeye is often depicted as capable of coming up with solutions to problems that (to the police, or, most importantly, the scientific community) seem insurmountable. Popeye has, alternatively, displayed Sherlock Holmes-like investigative prowess (determining for instance that his beloved Olive was abducted by estimating the depth of the villains' footprints in the s...

    Thimble Theatre was created by King Features Syndicate comic writer/artist E.C. Segar, and was his third published strip. The strip first appeared in the New York Journal, a newspaper operated by King Features owner William Randolph Hearst, on December 19, 1919 before later expanding into more papers. In its early years, the strip featured characters acting out various stories and scenarios in theatricalstyle (hence the strip's name). Thimble Theatre's first main characters/actors were the thin Olive Oyl and her boyfriend, Harold Hamgravy. After the strip moved away from its initial focus, it settled into a comedy-adventure style featuring Olive, Ham Gravy, and Olive's enterprising brother, Castor Oyl. Olive's parents, Cole and Nana Oyl, also made frequent appearances. Popeye first appeared in the strip on January 17, 1929 as a minor character. He was initially hired by Castor Oyl and Ham to crew a ship for a voyage to Dice Island, the location of a casino owned by the crooked gambl...

    [[wikipedia:File:Popeye-comic-book-cover.jpg|180px|right|thumb|Bud Sagendorf's cover of Popeye #50 (Oct.-Dec. 1959) shows Popeye with his corncob pipe, single good eye and girlfriend Olive Oyl.|]] There have been a number of Popeye comic books, from Dell, King Comics, Gold Key Comics, Charlton Comics and others, originally written and illustrated by Bud Sagendorf. In the Dell comics, Popeye became something like a freelance police assistant, fighting the mafia and Bluto's criminal activities. The new villains included the Misermite dwarves, who were identical. Popeye appeared in the British "TV Comic" series, a News of the World publication, becoming the cover story in 1960 with stories written and drawn by "Chick" Henderson. Bluto was referred to as Brutus and was Popeye's only nemesis throughout the entire run. A variety of artists have created Popeye comic book stories since then; for example, George Wildman drew Popeye stories for Charlton Comics from 1969 until the late 1970s....

    [[wikipedia:File:Polikarpov I-16-Mosca.jpg|thumb|Popeye on a Spanish Republican Air Force Polikarpov I-16. Museo del Aire|]]Local folklore in Chester, Illinois, Segar's hometown, claims that Popeye is based on Frank "Rocky" Fiegel, a man who was handy with his fists. Fiegel was born on January 27, 1868. He lived as a bachelor his entire life. It was said that later Segar sent checksto Fiegel in the 1930s. Culturally, many consider Popeye a precursor to the superheroes who would eventually come to dominate US comic books. Such has been Popeye's cultural impact that the medical profession sometimes refers to the biceps bulge symptomatic of a tendon rupture as the "Popeye muscle." Note, however, that under normal (non-spinach-influenced) conditions, Popeye has pronounced muscles of the forearm, not of the biceps. The 1988 Disney film Who Framed Roger Rabbitfeatured many classic cartoon characters, and the absence of Popeye was noted by some critics. Popeye (along with Bluto and Olive O...

    Characters originating in the comic strips

    Listed in rough order of original appearance 1. Olive Oyl 2. Castor Oyl(Olive Oyl's brother) 3. Cole Oyl (Olive Oyl's father) 4. Nana Oyl (Olive Oyl's mother) 5. Ham Gravy(full name Harold Hamgravy, Olive Oyl's original boyfriend) 6. Bernice (The "Whiffle Bird" in 1960s King Features TV shorts) 7. Popeye the Sailor 8. The Sea Hag 9. The Sea Hag's vultures, specifically Bernard 10. J. Wellington Wimpy 11. George W. Geezil(the local cobbler who hates Wimpy) 12. Rough House (a cookwho runs a loc...

    Characters originating in the cartoons

    1. Pipeye, Pupeye, Poopeye, Peepeye (Popeye's identical nephews) 2. Shorty (Popeye's shipmate in three World War II era Famous studios shorts) 3. Diesel Oyl (Olive's identical niece, a conceited brat who appears in three of the 1960s King Features shorts) 4. Popeye, Jr. (son of Popeye and Olive Oyl, exclusive of the series Popeye and Son) 5. Tank (son of Bluto, exclusive of the series Popeye and Son)

    Grandinetti, Fred M. Popeye: An Illustrated Cultural History. 2nd ed. McFarland, 2004. ISBN 0-7864-1605-X