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  1. Miliaria - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miliaria

    Miliaria, also called "sweat rash", is a skin disease marked by small and itchy rashes due to sweat trapped under the skin by clogged sweat gland ducts. Miliaria is a common ailment in hot and humid conditions, such as in the tropics and during the summer season. Although it affects people of all ages, it is especially common in children and infants due to their underdeveloped sweat glands.

    • Sweat rash, heat rash, prickly heat
    • Dermatology
  2. Miliaria - WikEM

    www.wikem.org/wiki/Miliaria

    Acute inflammation of sweat ducts caused by blockage of pores by macerated skin. Ducts become dilated under pressure and ultimately rupture. Often seen in areas of friction. This produces superficial vesicles in malpighian layer of skin on a red base.

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    What is a "prickly heat" rash?

    How does prickly heat spread?

    What does Prickly Heat look like?

  4. Prickly Heat: Treatments, Causes, and More

    www.healthline.com/health/prickly-heat

    May 11, 2019 · The condition that we call prickly heat, also known as heat rash, happens to adults and children when sweat becomes trapped under the skin. Prickly heat is sometimes called sweat rash or by its...

  5. Prickly heat (heat rash): Images, treatment, causes, and more

    www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/319612

    Oct 04, 2017 · Miliaria rubra, commonly called prickly heat or heat rash, is a rash that causes the skin to turn red, along with a warm, stinging, or prickly sensation. The feeling is usually accompanied by small...

  6. Heat rash - Symptoms and causes - Mayo Clinic

    www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/heat-rash/...
    • Overview
    • Symptoms
    • Causes
    • Risk Factors
    • Complications
    • Prevention

    Heat rash — also known as prickly heat and miliaria — isn't just for babies. It affects adults, too, especially during hot, humid weather.Heat rash develops when blocked pores (sweat ducts) trap perspiration under your skin. Symptoms range from superficial blisters to deep, red lumps. Some forms of heat rash feel prickly or intensely itchy.Heat rash usually clears on its own. Severe forms of the condition may need medical care, but the best way to relieve symptoms is to cool your skin and pre...

    Adults usually develop heat rash in skin folds and where clothing causes friction. In infants, the rash is mainly found on the neck, shoulders and chest. It can also show up in the armpits, elbow creases and groin.

    Heat rash develops when some of your sweat ducts clog. Instead of evaporating, perspiration gets trapped beneath the skin, causing inflammation and rash.It's not always clear why the sweat ducts become blocked, but certain factors seem to play a role, including: 1. Immature sweat ducts. A newborn's sweat ducts aren't fully developed. They can rupture more easily, trapping perspiration beneath the skin. Heat rash can develop in the first week of life, especially if the infant is being warmed i...

    Factors that make you more prone to heat rash include: 1. Age. Newborns are most susceptible. 2. Tropical climates. People living in the tropics are far more likely to have heat rash than are people in temperate climates. 3. Physical activity. Anything that makes you sweat heavily, especially if you're not wearing clothing that allows the sweat to evaporate, can trigger heat rash.

    Heat rash usually heals without problems, but it can lead to infection with bacteria, causing inflamed and itchy pustules.

    To help protect yourself or your child from heat rash: 1. Avoid overdressing. In summer, wear soft, lightweight, cotton clothing. In winter, children should dress only as warmly as an adult. 2. Avoid tightfitting clothes that can irritate skin. 3. When it's hot, stay in the shade or in an air-conditioned building or use a fan to circulate the air. 4. Keep your sleeping area cool and well-ventilated.

  7. Prickly heat: how to stop heat rash from ruining your summer

    www.getthegloss.com/article/sense-and...

    "Prickly heat, heat rash or sweat rash are all names used for a condition called miliaria," explains Dr Stefanie Williams, Dermatologist and Medical Director of Eudelo. "It occurs when sweat ducts get obstructed, sweat leaks into the skin and the skin gets inflamed around that tiny leakage.

  8. Heat Rash (Prickly Heat) in Babies & Adults: Symptoms, Causes ...

    www.webmd.com/.../understanding-heat-rash-basics

    Heat rash, also called prickly heat or miliaria, is a common condition in which areas of the skin feel prickly or sting due to overheating. It can itch a lot, but it’s not dangerous. It looks like...

  9. Heat Rash Pictures Treatment, Remedies & How to Get Rid of It!

    www.medicinenet.com/heat_rash/article.htm

    Heat rash or prickly heat, is caused when the sweat glands on the skin are blocked, and then they cannot produce enough sweat to cool the skin. Symptoms of heat rash are red bumps on the skin and a itchy or prickly feeling on the skin. Heat rash treatments include OTC creams and sprays.

  10. Heat rash - Diagnosis and treatment - Mayo Clinic

    www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/heat-rash/...
    • Treatment
    • Lifestyle and Home Remedies
    • Preparing For Your Appointment

    Avoiding overheating may be all you need to do for mild heat rash. Once skin is cool, heat rash tends to clear quickly.

    Tips to help your heat rash heal and to be more comfortable include the following: 1. In hot weather, dress in loose, lightweight clothing that wicks moisture away from your skin. 2. Spend as much time as possible in air-conditioned buildings. 3. Bathe or shower in cool water with nondrying soap, then let your skin air-dry instead of toweling off. 4. Use calamine lotion or cool compresses to calm itchy, irritated skin. 5. Avoid using creams and ointments that contain petroleum or mineral oil,...

    A doctor's appointment usually isn't necessary for heat rash. If your rash is more severe, you may want to see your primary care doctor or a doctor who specializes in skin disorders (dermatologist) to be sure it's heat rash and not another skin disorder.Before you go, it's a good idea to list questions you have about your condition. For heat rash, questions to ask your doctor include: 1. What could have caused this rash? 2. How can I treat it? 3. Do I need to limit physical activity until the...

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