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  1. Prince Andrew of Greece and Denmark - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Prince_Andrew_of_Greece

    Prince Andrew was born at the Tatoi Palace just north of Athens on 2 February 1882, the fourth son of George I of Greece. A member of the House of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg , he was a prince of both Greece and Denmark , as his father was a younger son of Christian IX of Denmark .

  2. Prince Andrew of Greece and Denmark - WIKI 2. Wikipedia ...

    wiki2.org › en › Prince_Andrew_of_Greece_and_Denmark

    Jul 05, 2019 · Prince Andrew of Greece and Denmark (Greek: Ανδρέας; 2 February [O.S. 20 January] 1882 – 3 December 1944) of the House of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg, was the seventh child and fourth son of King George I of Greece and Olga Constantinovna of Russia. He was a grandson of Christian IX of Denmark and father of Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh.

  3. Prince Andrew of Greece and Denmark

    gm.wikicore.net › wiki › Prince_Andrew_of_Greece_and

    Early life. Prince Andrew was born at the Tatoi Palace just north of Athens on February 2, 1882, the fourth son of George I of Greece.A member of the House of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg, he was a prince of both Greece and Denmark, as his father was a younger son of Christian IX of Denmark.

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  5. Princess Alice of Battenberg - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Princess_Alice_of_Greece

    Princess Alice met Prince Andrew of Greece and Denmark (known as Andrea within the family), the fourth son of King George I of Greece and Olga Constantinovna of Russia, while in London for King Edward VII's coronation in 1902. They married in a civil ceremony on 6 October 1903 at Darmstadt.

  6. Prince Andrew of Greece and Denmark - Alchetron, the free ...

    alchetron.com › Prince-Andrew-of-Greece-and-Denmark

    Apr 09, 2021 · Prince Andrew of Greece and Denmark (Andreas; 2 February 1882 (N.S.) – 3 December 1944) of the House of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glucksburg, was the seventh child and fourth son of King George I of Greece and Olga Constantinovna of Russia. He was a grandson of Christian IX of Denmark and father of Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh. Contents

    • Tripti Joshi
    • February 2, 1882
    • Princess Alice of Battenberg (M. 1903)
  7. Prince Andrew of Greece and Denmark - Infogalactic: the ...

    infogalactic.com › info › Prince_Andrew_of_Greece
    • Early Life
    • Marriage and Children
    • Early Career
    • Exile from Greece
    • Titles, Styles, Honours and Arms
    • References
    • Further Reading

    Prince Andrew was born in Athens in 1882, the fourth son of George I of Greece. He was taught English by his caretakers as he grew up, but in conversations with his parents he refused to speak anything but Greek. He also spoke German, Danish, Russian, and French. He attended cadet school and staff college at Athens, and was given additional private tuition in military subjects by Panagiotis Danglis. Despite his short-sightedness,Andrew joined the army as a cavalry officer in May 1901.

    In 1902, Prince Andrew met Princess Alice of Battenberg at the coronation of her grand-uncle and his aunt's husband, King Edward VII, in London. Princess Alice was a daughter of Prince Louis of Battenberg and Princess Victoria of Hesse and by Rhine. They fell in love, and the following year, on 6 October 1903, Andrew married Alice in a civil wedding at Darmstadt. The following day two religious wedding services were performed: one Lutheran in the Evangelical Castle Church, and another Greek Orthodoxin the Russian Chapel on the Mathildenhöhe. Prince and Princess Andrew had five children, all of whom later had children of their own.

    In 1909, the political situation in Greece led to a coup d'état, as the Athens government refused to support the Cretan parliament, which had called for the union of Crete (still nominally part of the Ottoman Empire) with the Greek mainland. A group of dissatisfied officers formed a Greek nationalist Military League that eventually led to Prince Andrew's resignation from the army and the rise to power of Eleftherios Venizelos. A few years later, at the outbreak of the Balkan Wars in 1912, Andrew was reinstated in the army as a lieutenant colonel in the 3rd Cavalry Regiment, and placed in command of a field hospital. During the war, his father was assassinated and Andrew inherited a villa on the island of Corfu, Mon Repos. In 1914, Andrew (like many European princes) held honorary military posts in both the German and Russian empires, as well as Prussian, Russian, Danish and Italian knighthoods. During World War I, he continued to visit Britain, despite veiled accusations in the Brit...

    For three years, Constantine's second son, Alexander, was king of Greece, until his early death from the after effects of a monkey bite. Constantine was restored to the throne, and Andrew was once again reinstated in the army, this time as a major-general. The family took up residence at Mon Repos. Andrew was given command of the II Army Corps during the Battle of the Sakarya, which effectively stalemated the Greco-Turkish War (1919–1922). Andrew had little respect for his superior officers, whom he considered incompetent. On 19 September 1921, Andrew was ordered to attack the Turkish positions, which he considered a desperate move little short "of ill-concealed panic". Refusing to put his men in undue danger, Andrew followed his own battle plan, much to the dismay of the commanding general, Anastasios Papoulas. Relieved of his Chief of Staff, and given a dressing-down by Papoulas, Andrew offered to resign his command but Papoulas refused. The Turks attacked and Andrew's Greek troop...

    Titles and styles

    1. 2 February 1882 – 3 December 1944: His Royal HighnessPrince Andrew of Greece and Denmark

    Brandreth, Gyles (2004). Philip and Elizabeth: Portrait of a Marriage. London: Century. ISBN 0-7126-6103-4
    Clogg, Richard (1979). A Short History of Modern Greece. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-521-22479-9
    Heald, Tim (1991). The Duke: A Portrait of Prince Philip. London: Hodder and Stoughton. ISBN 0-340-54607-7
    Van der Kiste, John (1994). Kings of the Hellenes. Stroud, Gloucestershire: Alan Sutton Publishing. ISBN 0-7509-0525-5

    Greece, Prince Andrew of (1930). Towards Disaster: The Greek Army in Asia Minor in 1921London: John Murray.

  8. Princess Alice of Battenberg - Wikipedia Republished // WIKI 2

    wiki2.org › en › Princess_Alice_of_Battenberg
    • Early Life
    • Marriage
    • Successive Life Crises
    • Illness
    • World War II
    • Widowhood
    • Death and Burial
    • Titles, Styles, and Honours
    • External Links

    Alice was born in the Tapestry Room at Windsor Castle in Berkshire in the presence of her great-grandmother, Queen Victoria. She was the eldest child of Prince Louis of Battenberg and his wife Princess Victoria of Hesse and by Rhine. Her mother was the eldest daughter of Louis IV, Grand Duke of Hesse and Princess Alice of the United Kingdom, the Queen's second daughter. Her father was the eldest son of Prince Alexander of Hesse and by Rhine through his morganatic marriage to Countess Julia Hauke, who was created Princess of Battenberg in 1858 by Louis III, Grand Duke of Hesse. Her three younger siblings, Louise, George, and Louis, later became Queen of Sweden, Marquess of Milford Haven, and Earl Mountbatten of Burma, respectively. She was christened Victoria Alice Elizabeth Julia Marie in Darmstadt on 25 April 1885. She had six godparents: her three surviving grandparents, Grand Duke Louis IV of Hesse, Prince Alexander of Hesse and by Rhine, and Julia, Princess of Battenberg; her au...

    Princess Alice met Prince Andrew of Greece and Denmark (known as Andrea within the family), the fourth son of King George I of Greece and Olga Constantinovna of Russia, while in London for King Edward VII's coronation in 1902. They married in a civil ceremony on 6 October 1903 at Darmstadt. The following day, there were two religious marriage ceremonies; one Lutheran in the Evangelical Castle Church, and one Greek Orthodox in the Russian Chapel on the Mathildenhöhe. She adopted the style of her husband, becoming "Princess Andrew". The bride and groom were closely related to the ruling houses of the United Kingdom, Germany, Russia, Denmark, and Greece, and their wedding was one of the great gatherings of the descendants of Queen Victoria and Christian IX of Denmark held before World War I.Prince and Princess Andrew had five children, all of whom later had children of their own. After their wedding, Prince Andrew continued his career in the military and Princess Andrew became involved...

    With the advent of the Balkan Wars, Prince Andrew was reinstated in the army and Princess Andrew acted as a nurse, assisting at operations and setting up field hospitals, work for which King George V awarded her the Royal Red Cross in 1913. During World War I, her brother-in-law King Constantine I of Greece followed a neutrality policy despite the democratically elected government of Venizelos supporting the Allies. Princess Andrew and her children were forced to shelter in the palace cellars during the French bombardment of Athens on 1 December 1916. By June 1917, the King's neutrality policy had become so untenable that she and other members of the Greek royal family were forced into exile when her brother-in-law abdicated. For the next few years, most of the Greek royal family lived in Switzerland. The global war effectively ended much of the political power of Europe's dynasties. The naval career of her father, Prince Louis of Battenberg, had collapsed at the beginning of the wa...

    The family settled in a small house loaned to them by Princess George of Greece at Saint-Cloud, on the outskirts of Paris, where Princess Andrew helped in a charity shop for Greek refugees. She became deeply religious, and in October 1928 converted to the Greek Orthodox Church. That winter, she translated her husband's defence of his actions during the Greco-Turkish War into English. Soon afterward, she began claiming that she was receiving divine messages and that she had healing powers. In 1930, after suffering a severe nervous breakdown, Princess Andrew was diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia, first by Thomas Ross, a psychiatrist who specialised in shell-shock, and subsequently by Sir Maurice Craig, who treated the future King George VI before he had speech therapy. The diagnosis was confirmed at Dr Ernst Simmel's sanatorium at Tegel, Berlin. She was forcibly removed from her family and placed in Dr Ludwig Binswanger's sanatorium in Kreuzlingen, Switzerland. It was a famous and...

    During World War II, Princess Andrew was in the difficult situation of having sons-in-law fighting on the German side and a son in the British Royal Navy. Her cousin, Prince Victor zu Erbach-Schönberg, was the German ambassador in Greece until the occupation of Athens by Axis forces in April 1941. She and her sister-in-law, Princess Nicholas of Greece, lived in Athens for the duration of the war, while most of the Greek royal family remained in exile in South Africa. She moved out of her small flat and into her brother-in-law George's three-storey house in the centre of Athens. She worked for the Red Cross, helped organise soup kitchens for the starving populace and flew to Sweden to bring back medical supplies on the pretext of visiting her sister, Louise, who was married to the Crown Prince.She organised two shelters for orphaned and stray children, and a nursing circuit for poor neighbourhoods. The occupying forces apparently presumed Princess Andrew was pro-German, as one of her...

    Princess Andrew returned to Great Britain in April 1947 to attend the November wedding of her only son, Philip, to Princess Elizabeth, the elder daughter and heir presumptive of King George VI. She had some of her remaining jewels used in Princess Elizabeth's engagement ring. On the day of the wedding, her son was created Duke of Edinburgh by George VI. For the wedding ceremony, Princess Andrew sat at the head of her family on the north side of Westminster Abbey, opposite the King, Queen Elizabeth and Queen Mary. It was decided not to invite Princess Andrew's daughters to the wedding because of anti-German sentiment in Britain following World War II. In January 1949, the princess founded a nursing order of Greek Orthodox nuns, the Christian Sisterhood of Martha and Mary, modelled after the convent that her aunt, the martyr Grand Duchess Elizabeth Fyodorovna, had founded in Russia in 1909. She trained on the Greek island of Tinos, established a home for the order in a hamlet north of...

    Despite suggestions of senility in later life, Princess Andrew remained lucid but physically frail. She died at Buckingham Palace on 5 December 1969. She left no possessions, having given everything away. Initially her remains were placed in the Royal Crypt in St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle, but before she died she had expressed her wish to be buried at the Convent of Saint Mary Magdalene in Gethsemane on the Mount of Olives in Jerusalem (near her aunt Grand Duchess Elizabeth Feodorovna, a Russian Orthodox saint). When her daughter, Princess George of Hanover, complained that it would be too far away for them to visit her grave, Princess Andrew jested, "Nonsense, there's a perfectly good bus service!"Her wish was realized on 3 August 1988 when her remains were transferred to her final resting place in a crypt below the church. On 31 October 1994 Princess Andrew's two surviving children, the Duke of Edinburgh and Princess George of Hanover, went to Yad Vashem (the Holocaust Memor...

    Titles and styles

    1. 25 February 1885 – 6 October 1903: Her Serene HighnessPrincess Alice of Battenberg 2. 6 October 1903 – 5 December 1969: Her Royal HighnessPrincess Andrew of Greece and Denmark 3. From 1949 until her death, she was sometimes known as Mother Superior Alice-Elizabeth

    Honours

    1. Dame Grand Cross of the Order of Saints Olga and Sophia(1903) 2. Royal Red Cross(1913) 3. Dame of the Order of Queen Maria Luisa(9 April 1928) Posthumous: 1. Righteous Among the Nations(1993)

    Portraits of Princess Alice of Battenberg at the National Portrait Gallery, London
  9. What is Prince Philip's relation to the Danish and Greek ...

    www.quora.com › What-is-Prince-Philips-relation-to

    Prince Philip is a Glücksborg, the Danish royal family, if you go by the male line, or the House of Slesvig-Holsten-Sønderborg-Glücksborg as it’s known in Denmark.

  10. prince andrew of greece and denmark children

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    prince andrew of greece and denmark children. Uncategorized; April 19, 2021 ...

  11. Princess Alice of Battenberg - Infogalactic: the planetary ...

    infogalactic.com › info › Princess_Alice_of_Battenberg

    Princess Alice of Battenberg, later Princess Andrew of Greece and Denmark (Victoria Alice Elizabeth Julia Marie; 25 February 1885 – 5 December 1969), was the mother of Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, and mother-in-law of Queen Elizabeth II. A great-granddaughter of Queen Victoria, she grew up in Germany, England and the Mediterranean.

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