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  1. Princeton University - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Princeton_University

    Princeton University is a private Ivy League research university in Princeton, New Jersey.Founded in 1746 in Elizabeth as the College of New Jersey, Princeton is the fourth-oldest institution of higher education in the United States and one of the nine colonial colleges chartered before the American Revolution.

  2. Princeton, British Columbia - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Princeton,_British_Columbia
    • Overview
    • History
    • Transportation
    • Princeton Museum
    • John Fall Allison and Susan Louisa Moir Allison

    Princeton is a town in the Similkameen region of southern British Columbia, Canada. It lies just east of the Cascade Mountains, which continue south into Washington, Oregon and California. The Tulameen and Similkameen Rivers converge here. At the 2016 census, the population was 2,828. Princeton centres on seven blocks of businesses along Bridge Street and five blocks on Vermilion Avenue; there are also businesses along British Columbia Highway 3. Historically, the area's main industry has been m

    Before European contact, the land around today's Princeton was known among First Nations people as a source of red ochre. Beginning no later than 1846, fur traders, settlers, and miners established trails connecting what was then known as Vermilion Forks to the Pacific Coast of British Columbia. John Fall Allison became, in 1858, the first permanent settler of European ancestry. To this day, the site of his home functions locally as a kilometre zero, with creeks east of Princeton having names li

    Princeton was formerly served by the Great Northern Railway and the Kettle Valley railway, neither of which still have tracks within the Similkameen Valley. Today princeton is accessible exclusively by road and air. On land, it is located at the junction of two highways and two major regional roads: Highway 5A to Merritt, Highway 3 to Hope and Osoyoos, as well as Coalmont Road to Coalmont and Tulameen, and the Princeton-Summerland Road. Public transportation is provided by the South Okanagan-Sim

    The Princeton and District Museum and Archives houses the Joe Pollard fossil collection, an early 1900s stagecoach, a 1934 fire engine, local First Nations artifacts, a collection of local newspapers, a collection of local butterflies, exhibits about pioneer life, a livery stable, and an old firehouse.

    After their marriage in 1868, John and Susan Louisa Moir Allison moved to the Similkameen Valley, becoming the first non-Aboriginal settlers to live there. The couple, aided by Mr Allison's knowledge of Chinook Jargon, a trade language, became close with nearby Aboriginal populations. There, the two produced 14 children. In the Valley, Mrs. Allison had what she described as her happiest days, traversing nearby mountains on horseback and establishing relationships with nearby First Nations. She c

    • 700.4 m (2,297.9 ft)
    • Canada
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  4. Princeton, Minnesota - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Princeton,_Minnesota
    • Overview
    • History
    • Geography
    • Demographics
    • "Coke Geysers" world record attempt

    Princeton is a city in Mille Lacs and Sherburne counties in the U.S. state of Minnesota, at the confluence of the Rum River and its West branch. The city is 50 miles north of Minneapolis and 30 miles east of St. Cloud, at the intersection of Highways 169 and 95. The population was 4,698 at the 2010 census. A majority of its residents live in Mille Lacs County.

    In the winter of 1855 Samuel Ross, Jame W. Gillian, Dorilus Morrison, John S. Prince and Richard Chute platted the town of Princeton. The plat was officially recorded on April 19, 1856.

    According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 5.18 square miles; 4.96 square miles is land and 0.22 square miles is water.

    As of the census of 2010, there were 4,698 people, 1,926 households, and 1,176 families living in the city. The population density was 947.2 inhabitants per square mile. There were 2,044 housing units at an average density of 412.1 per square mile. The racial makeup of the city w

    As of the census of 2000, there were 3,933 people, 1,624 households, and 998 families living in the city. The population density was 887.7 people per square mile. There were 1,670 housing units at an average density of 376.9 per square mile. The racial makeup of the city was 98.2

    The Princeton High School Student Council organized a community effort to break the world record for simultaneously erupting coke geysers on May 27, 2011. The record of 2,854 bottles was set in October 2010 in the Philippines. Hundreds of students participated, with a goal of setting off a series of 3,000 geysers, a figure they exceeded with 3,051 total simultaneous eruptions. But Guinness World Records personnel did not officiate the event and never made the record official. Students say the id

    • United States
    • 55.4K
  5. Princeton University is a private university in Princeton, New Jersey in the United States. It opened in 1746 with the name "The College of New Jersey". It was eventually named "Princeton University" in 1896. In conversation, it is simply called, "Princeton". Princeton is one of the 8 Ivy League colleges. It was the fourth official college in ...

  6. Princeton, Illinois - Simple English Wikipedia, the free ...

    simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Princeton,_Illinois

    Princeton is a city in Bureau County, Illinois, United States. It is also the county seat of Bureau County. In 2010, 7,660 people lived there. Princeton is part of the Ottawa–Streator Micropolitan Statistical Area

    • United States
    • Bureau
  7. Princeton, Texas - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Princeton,_Texas

    Princeton voters rejected Home Rule each time: 149 to 117 in November 2007, 239 to 165 in May 2008, 979 to 449 in November 2008, and 260 to 151 in May 2014. [26] In Jan. 2015, a year long transparency study of 113 area cities, counties, and school districts was completed by The Dallas Morning News. [27]

  8. Princeton, West Virginia - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Princeton,_West_Virginia

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Princeton, is a city in and the county seat of Mercer County, West Virginia, United States. The city has often been referred to as the “Jewel of the South” or the “Heart of Mercer County” more recently. The population was 6,432 at the 2010 census.

    • 2,438 ft (743 m)
    • Mercer
  9. Princeton, Indiana - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Princeton,_Indiana
    • Overview
    • History
    • Geography
    • Demographics
    • Economy
    • Government

    Princeton is a city in Patoka Township, Gibson County, Indiana, United States. The population was 8,644 at the 2010 census, and it is part of the greater Evansville, Indiana, Metropolitan Area. The city is the county seat of and the largest city in Gibson County.

    In 1800, the Indiana Territory was created with Vincennes as its capital. The rich farmlands in the southwest of the territory with access to the Ohio River attracted many pioneers and settlers to the area, one of whom was an Irish immigrant named William Prince. Born in 1772, he immigrated to America twenty-two years later. He would become a Gibson County Commissioner and the county seat of Princeton is named after him. The year 1813 saw the move of the territorial capital east from Vincennes t

    Princeton is located at 38°21′13″N 87°34′14″W / 38.35361°N 87.57056°W / 38.35361; -87.57056. According to the 2010 census, Princeton has a total area of 5.075 square miles, of which 5.07 square miles is land and 0.005 square miles is water.

    As of the census of 2010, there were 8,644 people, 3,516 households, and 2,129 families living in the city. The population density was 1,704.9 inhabitants per square mile. There were 3,976 housing units at an average density of 784.2 per square mile. The racial makeup of the city

    As of the census of 2000, there were 8,175 people, 3,451 households, and 2,146 families living in the city. The population density was 1,703.1 people per square mile. There were 3,806 housing units at an average density of 792.9 per square mile. The racial makeup of the city was

    Major employers in Princeton include Toyota Motor Manufacturing Indiana, located 3 miles to the south, nearly halfway between Princeton and Fort Branch, where the Toyota Sequoia, Sienna, and Highlander are manufactured; and Hansen Corporation. Many Toyota suppliers have facilities between the plant site and the city. These suppliers include EnovaPremier, Vuteq, TISA, Millennium Steel, Gibson County Quality Assurance, and Product Action International. All of these facilities were either built or

    Princeton is governed by a mayor and a five-member city council, all of whom are elected for four-year terms. The current mayor is Brad Schmitt, Republican as of January 1, 2016. City functions are divided among the Police Department, Sanitation Department, Parks and Recreation Department, Street Department, Sewer Department, Water Department, Water Treatment Plant, and the Princeton Fire Territory. Like most Midwestern small towns, Princeton's citizens are generally socially conservative. Howev

    • 430 ft (121 m)
    • Gibson
  10. Princeton University Press - Wikipedia

    sh.wikipedia.org/wiki/Princeton_University_Press

    Princeton Mathematical Series (Phillip A. Griffiths, John N. Mather i Elias M. Stein, urednici) Princeton Series in Astrophysics (David N. Spergel, urednik) Princeton Series in Complexity (Simon A. Levin i Steven H. Strogatz, urednici) Princeton Series in Evolutionary Biology (H. Allen Orr, urednik)

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