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  1. The 2017 Conservative Party of Canada leadership election was held on May 27, 2017. Party members chose Andrew Scheer as leader, replacing Stephen Harper , who led the Conservative Party of Canada as its leader from 2004 following the merger of the Canadian Alliance and Progressive Conservative parties.

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  2. The Progressive Conservative Party of Canada (PC; French: Parti progressiste-conservateur du Canada) was a centre-right federal political party in Canada that existed from 1942 to 2003. Originally the early Conservative Party that was founded by Prime Minister John A. Macdonald , its name was changed to the Progressive Conservative Party in 1942 under the request of Manitoba Progressive Premier John Bracken .

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    When did the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada dissolve?

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    • History
    • Principles and Policies
    • Regional Conservative Parties
    • Composition
    • Party Leadership Figures
    • Parliamentary Caucus
    • See Also
    • Further Reading
    • External Links

    Predecessors

    The Conservative Party is political heir to a series of right-of-centre parties that have existed in Canada, beginning with the Liberal-Conservative Party founded in 1854 by John A. Macdonald and George-Étienne Cartier. The party later became known simply as the Conservative Party after 1873. Like its historical predecessors and conservative parties in some other Commonwealth nations (such as the Conservative Party of the United Kingdom), members of the present-day Conservative Party of Canad...

    Leadership election, 2004

    In the immediate aftermath of the merger announcement, some Conservative activists hoped to recruit former Ontario premier Mike Harris for the leadership. Harris declined the invitation, as did New Brunswick Premier Bernard Lord and Alberta Premier Ralph Klein. Outgoing Progressive Conservative leader Peter MacKay also announced he would not seek the leadership, as did former Democratic Representative Caucus leader Chuck Strahl. Jim Prentice, who had been a candidate in the 2003 PC leadership...

    2004 general election

    Two months after Harper's election as national Tory leader, Liberal Party of Canada leader and Prime Minister Paul Martin called a general electionfor 28 June 2004. For the first time since the 1993 federal election, a Liberal government would have to deal with an opposition party that was generally seen as being able to form government. The Liberals attempted to counter this with an early election call, as this would give the Conservatives less time to consolidate their merger. During the fi...

    As a relatively young party with a mixed political heritage and history, the federal Conservatives are often described as a "big tent" party in a similar manner to the federal Canadian Liberals by encompassing members and voters who hold a variety of philosophies, ideas and stances, albeit sitting within the centre-right to the right-wingof the political spectrum. In an effort to create a cohesive platform following its creation, the Conservative Party declared its founding core philosophies and principles to be fiscal accountability, upholding individual rights and freedom, belief in constitutional monarchy, the institutions of Parliament and Canada's democratic process, support for strong national defense, law and order, and Canada's history and traditions, and equal treatment for all Canadians.

    The Conservative Party, while having no provincial wings, largely works with the former federal Progressive Conservative Party's provincial affiliates. There have been calls to change the names of the provincial parties from "Progressive Conservative" to "Conservative". However, there are other small "c" conservative parties with which the federal Conservative Party has close ties, such as the Saskatchewan Party and the British Columbia Liberal Party (not associated with the federal Liberal Party of Canada despite its name). The federal Conservative Party has the support of many of the provincial Conservative leaders. In Ontario, successive provincial PC Party leaders John Tory, Bob Runciman and Tim Hudak have expressed open support for Stephen Harper and the Conservative Party of Canada, while former Mike Harris cabinet members Tony Clement, and John Baird were ministers in Harper's government.[citation needed] In Quebec, businessman Adrien D. Pouliot leads a new Conservative Party...

    National Council

    The National Council of the CPC is its "highest governing body". The Council president, Robert Batherson—who was elected by CPC delegates on March 21, 2021 at the March 18–20 virtual policy convention to replace Scott Lamb—is the first president to come from the Atlantic provinces since the CPC was founded in 2003. Batherson and the Council—along with the "campaign team working with the [Conservative] Fund"—will focus on ensuring that Erin O'Toole becomes prime minister in the next federal el...

    Geography

    The Conservative Party has historically been strongest in the Canadian Prairies as well as rural Ontario. The party is strongest particularly in the provinces of Alberta and Saskatchewan, where it holds 33 out of 34 and all 14 federal seats respectively. It tends to be weaker in Quebec and Atlantic Canada, particularly Newfoundland and Labrador and Prince Edward Island.

    Deputy Leader

    The Deputy Leader is appointed by the Leader.

    Party presidents

    1. Don Plett (2003–2009) interim until 2005 2. John Walsh(2009–2016) 3. Scott Lamb(2016–2021) 4. Robert Batherson(2021–present)

    Senate Caucus

    The Conservative Party's senate caucus is the only political Senate Group that is formally linked to a Federal political party. Unlike the Independent Senators Group, Canadian Senators Group and the Progressive Senate Group, which are unaffiliated with any party in the House of Commons, Conservative senators form part of the national Conservative parliamentary caucus made up of members of both houses of parliament, though the senators do meet separately to discuss Senate-specific issues. The...

    Archival holdings

    1. Conservative Party of Canada - Canadian Political Parties and Political Interest Groups- Web Archive created by the University of Toronto Libraries 2. Conservative Party of Canada (French) - Canadian Political Parties and Political Interest Groups- Web Archive created by the University of Toronto Libraries

    Media related to Conservative Party of Canadaat Wikimedia Commons
    Conservative Party of Canada at Wikinews
    • History
    • Ideology
    • Progressive Conservative History
    • Rump PC Caucus
    • Progressive Canadian Party
    • Party Presidents
    • See Also
    • Further Reading

    Canada's first Prime Min­is­ter, Sir John A. Mac­don­ald, be­longed to the Lib­eral-Con­ser­v­a­tive Party. But in ad­vance of con­fed­er­a­tion in 1867, the Con­ser­v­a­tive Party took in a large num­ber of de­fec­tors from the Lib­er­als who sup­ported the es­tab­lish­ment of a Cana­dian Con­fed­er­a­tion. There­after, the Con­ser­v­a­tive Party be­came the Lib­eral-Con­ser­v­a­tive Party(in French, "Libéral-Con­ser­va­teur") until the turn of the twen­ti­eth cen­tury. The fed­eral To­ries gov­erned Canada for over forty of the coun­try's first 70 years of ex­is­tence. How­ever, the party spent the ma­jor­ity of its his­tory in op­po­si­tion as the na­tion's num­ber-two fed­eral party, be­hind the Lib­eral Party of Canada. From 1896 to 1993 the To­ries formed a gov­ern­ment only five times—from 1911 to 1921, from 1930 to 1935, from 1957 to 1963, from 1979 to 1980 and from 1984 to 1993. It stands as the only Cana­dian party to have won more than 200 seats in an elec­tion—a feat it...

    The Pro­gres­sive Con­ser­v­a­tive Party was gen­er­ally on the cen­tre-right on the po­lit­i­cal spec­trum. From 1867 on, the party was iden­ti­fied with Protes­tant and, in Que­bec, Roman Catholic so­cial val­ues, British im­pe­ri­al­ism, Cana­dian na­tion­al­ism, and con­sti­tu­tional cen­tral­ism. This was highly suc­cess­ful up until 1920, and to that point in his­tory, the party was the most suc­cess­ful fed­eral party in the Do­min­ion. As such, Cana­dian con­ser­vatism has his­tor­i­cally more closely re­sem­bled that which was prac­tised in the United King­dom and, to an ex­tent, Eu­rope, than in the United States. The "Tory" ap­proach worked well for the party up until 1917, when, as was com­mon amongst 19th-cen­tury con­ser­v­a­tive move­ments, Cana­dian To­ries op­posed the roll­back of gov­ern­ment in­ter­ven­tion in so­cial and eco­nomic mat­ters ad­vo­cated by the lib­er­als of the era. In con­trast to "Amer­i­can con­ser­v­a­tive" coun­ter­parts, how­ever, they did n...

    After a by-elec­tion de­feat in 1942, a group of younger Con­ser­v­a­tives from the Con­ser­v­a­tive Party of Canada met in Port Hope, On­tario, to de­velop a new Con­ser­v­a­tive pol­icy they hoped would bring them out of the po­lit­i­cal wilder­ness. The par­tic­i­pants, known as the Port Hope­fuls, de­vel­oped a pro­gram in­clud­ing many Con­ser­v­a­tive goals such as sup­port for free en­ter­prise and con­scrip­tion. Yet the char­ter also in­cluded more rad­i­cal poli­cies, such as full-em­ploy­ment, low-cost hous­ing, trade union rights, as well as a whole range of so­cial se­cu­ritymea­sures, in­clud­ing a gov­ern­ment fi­nanced medicare system. Al­though many Con­ser­v­a­tives re­jected the char­ter, the char­ter still in­flu­enced party de­ci­sions. Del­e­gates at the con­ven­tion drafted John Brackenas leader, who was not even a mem­ber of the party. Bracken sup­ported the Port Hope Char­ter and in­sisted the party reg­is­ter this pol­icy shift by chang­ing its name to the...

    House of Commons

    Fol­low­ing the merger, a rump Pro­gres­sive Con­ser­v­a­tive cau­cus re­mained in Par­lia­ment, con­sist­ing of in­di­vid­u­als who de­clined to join the new Con­ser­v­a­tive Party. In the House of Com­mons, Joe Clark, André Bac­hand and John Her­ron sat as PC mem­bers. In the 2004 elec­tion, Bac­hand and Clark did not run for re-elec­tion, and Her­ron ran as a Lib­eral, los­ing to Rob Moore in his rid­ing of Fundy—Royal. Scott Bri­son, who had joined the Lib­eral cau­cus im­me­di­ately upon...

    Senate

    In the Sen­ate, William Doody, Low­ell Mur­ray and Nor­man Atkins also de­clined to join the new party, and con­tin­ued to sit as Pro­gres­sive Con­ser­v­a­tive sen­a­tors. On March 24, 2005, Prime Min­is­ter Paul Mar­tin ap­pointed nine new sen­a­tors, two of whom, Nancy Ruth and Elaine McCoy, were des­ig­nated as Pro­gres­sive Con­ser­v­a­tives. Ruth sub­se­quently left to sit with the Con­ser­v­a­tive Party. The death of Sen­a­tor Doody on De­cem­ber 27, 2005, and the manda­tory re­tire­me...

    On Jan­u­ary 9, 2004, a group claim­ing to be loyal to the Pro­gres­sive Con­ser­v­a­tive Party and op­posed to the merger, which they char­ac­ter­ized as an Al­liance takeover, filed ap­pli­ca­tion with the Chief Elec­toral Of­fi­cer to reg­is­ter a party called the Pro­gres­sive Con­ser­v­a­tive Party of Canada. The ap­pli­ca­tion was re­fused on the grounds that the name could no longer be uti­lized. The group re­sub­mit­ted with the name Pro­gres­sive Cana­dian Party, and a new "PC Party" was rec­og­nized by Elec­tions Canada on March 26. It se­cured suf­fi­cient back­ing to be reg­is­tered as an of­fi­cial party on May 29. It is led by for­mer Pro­gres­sive Con­ser­v­a­tive MP Joe Hueglinof On­tario. The Pro­gres­sive Cana­dian party aims to be per­ceived as the suc­ces­sor party to the Pro­gres­sive Con­ser­v­a­tives. How­ever, it does not enjoy broad sup­port among for­mer Pro­gres­sive Con­ser­v­a­tives. In par­tic­u­lar, no promi­nent anti-merger Pro­gres­sive Con­ser­v­a­t...

    Perlin, George C. The Tory Syndrome: Leadership Politics in the Progressive Conservative Party. Montréal, Qué.: McGill-Queen's University Press, 1980. ISBN 0-7735-0350-1

  4. The Progressive Conservative Party of Canada (PC; French: Parti progressiste-conservateur du Canada) was a centre-right federal political party in Canada.. In 2003, the party membership voted to dissolve the party and merge with the Canadian Alliance to form the modern-day Conservative Party of Canada.

    • History
    • Ideology
    • Progressive Conservative History
    • Rump PC Caucus
    • Progressive Canadian Party
    • Party Presidents
    • See Also
    • Further Reading

    Canada's first Prime Minister, Sir John A. Macdonald, belonged to the Liberal-Conservative Party. But in advance of confederation in 1867, the Conservative Party took in a large number of defectors from the Liberals who supported the establishment of a Canadian Confederation. Thereafter, the Conservative Party became the Liberal-Conservative Party (French: Libéral-Conservateur) until the turn of the twentieth century. The federal Tories governed Canada for over 40 of the country's first 70 years of existence. However, the party spent the majority of its history in opposition as the nation's number-two federal party, behind the Liberal Party of Canada. From 1896 to 1993 the Tories formed a government only five times—from 1911 to 1921, from 1930 to 1935, from 1957 to 1963, from 1979 to 1980 and from 1984 to 1993. It stands as the only Canadian party to have won more than 200 seats in an election—a feat it accomplished twice: in 1958 and 1984. The party suffered a decade-long decline f...

    The Progressive Conservative Party was generally on the centre-right on the political spectrum. From 1867 on, the party was identified with Protestant and, in Quebec, Roman Catholic social values, British imperialism, Canadian nationalism, and constitutional centralism. This was highly successful until 1920, and to that point in history, the party was the most successful federal party in the Dominion. As such, Canadian conservatism historically initially more closely resembled that which was practised in the United Kingdom and, to an extent, Europe, than in the United States. The "Tory" approach worked well for the party until 1917, when, as was common amongst 19th-century conservative movements, Canadian Tories opposed the rollback of government intervention in social and economic matters advocated by the liberals of the era. In contrast to "American conservative" counterparts, however, they did not undertake as dramatic an ideological turnaround in the first half of the 20th centu...

    After a by-election defeat in 1942, a group of younger Conservatives from the Conservative Party of Canada met in Port Hope, Ontario, to develop a new Conservative policy they hoped would bring them out of the political wilderness. The participants, known as the Port Hopefuls, developed a program including many Conservative goals such as support for free enterprise and conscription. Yet the charter also included more radical policies, such as full-employment, low-cost housing, trade union rights, as well as a whole range of social securitymeasures, including a government financed medicare system. Although many Conservatives rejected the charter, the charter still influenced party decisions. Delegates at the convention drafted John Brackenas leader, who was not even a member of the party. Bracken supported the Port Hope Charter and insisted the party register this policy shift by changing its name to the Progressive Conservative Party. In the early days of Canadian confederation, the...

    House of Commons

    Following the merger, a rump Progressive Conservative caucus remained in Parliament, consisting of individuals who declined to join the new Conservative Party. In the House of Commons, Joe Clark, André Bachand and John Herron sat as PC members. In the 2004 election, Bachand and Clark did not run for re-election, and Herron ran as a Liberal, losing to Rob Moore in his riding of Fundy—Royal. Scott Brison, who had joined the Liberal caucus immediately upon departing the Conservative Party, was r...

    Senate

    In the Senate, William Doody, Lowell Murray and Norman Atkins also declined to join the new party, and continued to sit as Progressive Conservative senators. On March 24, 2005, Prime Minister Paul Martin appointed nine new senators, two of whom, Nancy Ruth and Elaine McCoy, were designated as Progressive Conservatives. Ruth subsequently left to sit with the Conservative Party. The death of Senator Doody on December 27, 2005, and the mandatory retirement of Norman Atkins on June 27, 2009, and...

    On January 9, 2004, a group claiming to be loyal to the Progressive Conservative Party and opposed to the merger, which they characterized as an Alliance takeover, filed application with the Chief Electoral Officer to register a party called the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada. The application was refused on the grounds that the name could no longer be utilized. The group resubmitted with the name Progressive Canadian Party, and a new "PC Party" was recognized by Elections Canada on March 26. It secured sufficient backing to be registered as an official party on May 29. It was led by former Progressive Conservative MP Joe Hueglinof Ontario. The Progressive Canadian party aimed to be perceived as the successor party to the Progressive Conservatives. However, it did not enjoy broad support among former Progressive Conservatives. In particular, no prominent anti-merger Progressive Conservatives such as Joe Clark or David Orchard were associated with the Progressive Canadian Pa...

    Perlin, George C. The Tory Syndrome: Leadership Politics in the Progressive Conservative Party. Montréal, Qué.: McGill-Queen's University Press, 1980. ISBN 0-7735-0350-1

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