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  1. House at Tarninowa Street 1. Great location. All rooms in the house have been specially renovated and adapted to the needs of our tenants. They are intended for students and young working people. The apartment has free WiFi Internet available to residents. The house has 4 floors - each has 6 single rooms.

  2. ^ Joshua D. Zimmerman, פולנים, יהודים ופוליטיקה של הלאוםאוניברסיטת הוצאת ויסקונסין, 2004, ISBN 0-299-19464-7, Google Print, עמ '16 ^ Robert Bubczyk. A History of Poland in Outline. Maria Curie-Skłodowska University Press. 2002. עמ ' 68.

  3. everything.explained.today › Łódź,_PolandŁódź Explained

    Łódź, also rendered in English as Lodz, is the third-largest city in Poland and a former industrial centre. Located in the central part of the country, it has a population of 679,941 (2019). Located in the central part of the country, it has a population of 679,941 (2019).

  4. Łódź (Polish: [wutɕ] (listen); also written in English as Lodz) is the third-largest city in Poland and a former industrial hub. Located in the central part of the country, it has a population of 685,285 (2018). It is the capital of Łódź Voivodeship, and is located approximately 120 kilometres (75 mi) south-west of Warsaw. The city's coat of arms is an example of canting, as it depicts ...

    • Agricultural Łódź
    • Industrial Growth
    • World War 2
    • After 1945

    Łódź first appears in the written record in a 1332 document giving the village of Łodzia to the bishops of Włocławek. In 1423 King Władysław Jagiełło granted city rights to the village of Łódź. From then until the 18th century the town remained a small settlement on a trade route between Masovia and Silesia. In the 16th century the town had fewer than 800 inhabitants, mostly working on the nearby grain farms. With the second partition of Poland in 1793, Łódź became part of the Kingdom of Prussia‘s province of South Prussia, and was known in German as Lodsch. In 1798 the Prussians nationalised the town, and it lost its status as a town of the bishops of Kuyavia. In 1806 Łódź joined the Napoleonic Duchy of Warsaw and in 1810 it had 190 inhabitants. In the 1815 Congress of Vienna treaty it became part of Congress Poland, a client state of the Russian Empire.

    In the 1815 treaty, it was planned to renew the dilapidated town and with the 1816 decree by the Czar a number of German immigrants received territory deeds for them to clear the land and to build factories and housing. In 1820 Stanisław Staszic aided in changing the small town into a modern industrial centre. The immigrants came to the Promised Land ( Ziemia obiecana, the city’s nickname) from all over Europe. Mostly they arrived from Southern Germany, Silesia andBohemia, but also from countries as far away as Portugal, England, France and Ireland. The first cotton mill opened in 1825, and 14 years later the first steam-poweredfactory in both Poland and Russia commenced operations. In 1839 the population was 80% Germans and German schools and churches were established. A constant influx of workers, businessmen and craftsmen from all over Europe transformed Łódź into the main textile production centre of the Russian Empire. Three groups dominated the city’s population and contribute...

    During the Invasion of Poland the Polish forces of the Łódź Army of General Juliusz Rómmel defended Łódź against initial German attacks. However, the Wehrmacht captured the city on 8 September. Despite plans for the city to become a Polish exclave, attached to the General Government, the Nazi hierarchy respected the wishes of the local governor of Reichsgau Wartheland, Arthur Greiser, and of many of the ethnic Germans living in the city, and annexed it to the Reich in November 1939. The city received the new name of Litzmannstadt after the German general Karl Litzmann, who captured the city during World War I. Nevertheless, many Łódź Germans refused to sign Volksliste and become Volksdeutsche, instead being deported to the General Government. Soon the Nazi authorities set up the Łódź Ghetto in the city and populated it with more than 200,000 Jews from the Łódź area. As Jews were deported from Litzmannstadt for extermination others were brought in. Due to the value of the goods that...

    At the end of World War II, Łódź had fewer than 300,000 inhabitants. However the number began to grow as refugees from Warsaw and territories annexed by the Soviet Union immigrated. Until 1948 the city served as a de facto capital of Poland, since events during and after the Warsaw uprising had thoroughly destroyed Warsaw, and most of the government and country administration resided in Łódź. Some planned moving the capital there permanently, however this idea did not gain popular support and in 1948 the reconstruction of Warsaw began. Under the Polish Communist regime many of the industrialist families lost their wealth when the authorities nationalised private companies. Once again the city became a major centre of industry. In mid-1981 Łódź became famous for its massive, 50,000 hunger demonstration of local mothers and their children (see: Summer 1981 hunger demonstrations in Poland). After the period of economic transition during the 1990s, most enterprises were again privatised...

  5. 5 days in Warsaw BY A USER FROM ITALY Walking tours Zamek Krolewski w Warszawie - Muzeum St. Anne's Church (Kosciol Swietej Anny) 5 days in Warsaw BY A USER FROM GREECE Walking tours Zamek Krolewski w Warszawie - Muzeum St. Anne's Church (Kosciol Swietej Anny) 7 days in Poland BY A USER FROM SINGAPORE Gdansk Warsaw Krakow 18 days in Lodz BY A ...

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