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  1. Best (1485-1603) Tudor England Maps & Charts ideas | 30 ...

    www.pinterest.co.uk/bh0008/1485-1603-tudor...

    'BeingBess' is dedicated to celebrating the life and legacy of Queen Elizabeth I of England (1533-1603) through research, first-person interpretation and multimedia. Key Stage 3 at www.johndclare.net This would be the first thing you would have seen as you approached London.

  2. Pastscape - Detailed Result: RICHMOND PALACE

    www.pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=398000

    His wife Anne of Cleves was bestowed Richmond and occupied it from 1540-47, and Queen Elizabeth I died there in 1603. From the 17th century the palace was used less frequently by the royal family and it began to be demolished with several new buildings constructed.

  3. THE HISTORY OF RICHMOND PARK

    hearsumcollection.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/...

    Richmond Palace was a favourite home of Elizabeth I, who died there in 1603. Later, Charles I, King of England from 1625 to 1649, also favoured Richmond Palace as a royal residence and made it the home of the royal children (and sometimes used it as a sanctuary from the plague in central London). Charles was “excessivelyaffected to Hunting,

  4. Elizabeth I of England Tour Map with Places to Visit ...

    www.wikitour.io/tours/elizabeth-i-of-england

    Elizabeth I (7 September 1533 – 24 March 1603) was Queen of England and Ireland from 17 November 1558 until her death on 24 March 1603. Sometimes called The Virgin Queen, Gloriana or Good Queen Bess, Elizabeth was the last monarch of the House of Tudor. Explore the places of Elizabeth's I life in this tour!

  5. 1600s in England - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1603_in_England

    Monarch – Elizabeth I (until 24 March 1603), James I (starting 24 March 1603) Parliament – 10th of Queen Elizabeth I (starting 27 October, until 19 December 1601), Blessed (starting 19 March 1604)

  6. Richmond Palace London High Resolution Stock Photography and ...

    www.alamy.com/stock-photo/richmond-palace-london...

    Richmond Palace was a royal residence on the River Thames in London, England in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries erected about 1501 by Henry VII of England. It lay on the opposite bank from the Palace of Westminster and once Elizabeth I became queen she spent much of her time there, as she enjoyed hunting stags in the 'Newe Parke of ...

  7. Queen Elizabeth I: The Controversies and the Accomplishments ...

    www.ancient-origins.net/history-famous-people/...
    • What Was Elizabeth’s Place in The Royal Family?
    • The Succession
    • What Divided England as Elizabeth I Started Her Reign?
    • The Spanish Armada Backfires and Launches England’s Power
    • Catholic Persecution
    • Arts and Literature Flourish to Beget Great Works
    • A Fall from Grace
    • Elizabeth L, The Virgin Queen?

    Elizabeth I was born on the 7 th of September 1533. She was the daughter of Henry VIII and his second wife, Anne Boleyn. Before Elizabeth reached the age of three, her mother was charged with adultery, incest, and high treason and executed. By the time of her father’s death in 1547, Elizabeth was third in line to the English throne, behind her younger half-brother Edward and older half-sister Mary. Although she was not expected to inherit the throne, she was not neglected by her father and re...

    Henry VIII was succeeded by his son Edward VI who reigned for a mere six years before succumbing to tuberculosis at the age of 15. Edward was succeeded by Mary, who in turn ruled for five years until her death in 1558. As Mary died without issue, she was succeeded by her younger half-sister Elizabeth. King Felipe II of Spain and Queen Mary I of England , during whose reign Elizabeth was heir presumptive. (Bedford Collection-Woburn Abbey / Public Domain )

    One of the major problems faced by Elizabeth as she took up the reins of government was the religious division in the kingdom. Henry VIII had initiated the English Reformation and broke away from the Roman Catholic Church. The position of the newly-formed Church of England continued to be strengthened during Edward’s reign. His successor Mary, however, reversed the policies of her predecessors, leading to the restoration of Roman Catholicism in England. Elizabeth sought to achieve a compromis...

    Elizabeth’s return to Protestantism and her re-establishment of the Church of England was one of the reasons for the launching of the Spanish Armada by Philip II of Spain, although it may be said that this occurred much later during Elizabeth’s reign, i.e. in 1588. The Spanish plan was to invade England, overthrow the queen, and re-establish Roman Catholicism in England. The invasion was a failure and a blow to the prestige of Spain, which was a superpower at that time. On the other hand, the...

    Roman Catholics did not have an easy time during the reign of Elizabeth. Fines were introduced for attending mass, while the saying or arranging of mass carried the death penalty – though Elizabeth disliked such extremism and so executions were rarely carried out in the early days of her reign. Her stance was that as long as Catholics remained loyal to her as the queen and did not engage in any actions of civil disobedience, they were free to believe what they wished. However, as the threat f...

    Despite the constant threats to Elizabeth, the late part of her reign saw the flourishing of English literature, especially in the genre of drama. It was during the Elizabethan era that William Shakespeare , arguably the most influential English playwright, lived and worked. Some of the Bard’s contemporaries included fellow playwright Christopher Marlowe and the poet Edmund Spencer.

    Although Elizabeth had been a well-loved ruler, her popularity fell during the latter part of her reign. Having successfully defended England against the Spanish Armada, Elizabeth launched military campaigns against Spain. These undertakings were not successful and resulted in the kingdom being laden with debt. The financial strains placed on the kingdom by these wars made life difficult for the people and her debts were inherited by her successor. Silver sixpence, struck 1593, identifying El...

    Elizabeth is known also as the Virgin Queen as she never married. It has been claimed that this was a shrewd decision on the part of Elizabeth. Marrying a foreign prince would have repercussions on the kingdom’s foreign policy. While marrying a fellow Englishman would have resulted in the queen being embroiled in factional in-fighting. Interestingly, Elizabeth’s refusal to marry has given rise to a rather far-fetched conspiracy theory known as the ‘Bisley Boy’ story. According to this story,...

  8. Elizabeth I | MindMeister Mind Map

    www.mindmeister.com/330665557/elizabeth-i

    Elizabeth I by Ravon Koonce 1. Queen Elizabeth I was born at Greenwich on September 7, 1533, the daughter of Henry VIII and his second wife, Anne Boleyn. 2. Elizabeth succeeded to the throne on her half-sister's death in November 1558. 3. Coronated on January 15, 1559 4. In the 1580s Spain emerged as the chief threat to England.

  9. Elizabeth (I, Queen of England 1558-1603)

    www.timeref.com/people/hpr2117.htm

    Elizabeth's father, Henry VIII King of England, died in January 1547. Even though Prince Edward was the youngest of Henry's three children he was the only male and so became the next king of England. Prince Edward was only nine years old at the time of his father's death and was too young to rule.

  10. Elizabeth I (1533-1603) - Find A Grave Memorial

    www.findagrave.com/memorial/1973

    English Monarch. The daughter of Henry VIII and his ill-fated queen, Anne Boleyn. When her mother was executed and the marriage declared null and void, Elizabeth was declared illegitimate and deprived of her place in the line of succession. When the king died in 1547, despite being officially illegitimate, Elizabeth...

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