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  1. Richmond, London - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richmond_History

    Richmond is a town in south-west London, 8.2 miles (13.2 km) west-southwest of Charing Cross.It is on a meander of the River Thames, with many parks and open spaces, including Richmond Park, and many protected conservation areas, which include much of Richmond Hill.

    • 21,469 (North Richmond and South Richmond wards 2011)
    • Richmond
  2. How Queen Elizabeth and King Philip went ... - History Magazine

    www.nationalgeographic.com/history/world-history...

    Oct 04, 2018 · In March 1603 Elizabeth died at Richmond, from where her body was transferred along the Thames to Whitehall. Following the end of the English Civil War in 1651, the palace fell into ruin.

  3. Hampton Court Palace - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/King's_Beasts

    Hampton Court Palace is a Grade I listed royal palace in the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames, 12 miles (19.3 kilometres) south west and upstream of central London on the River Thames. Building of the palace began in 1515 for Cardinal Thomas Wolsey , the chief minister of King Henry VIII .

  4. List of British royal residences - WikiMili, The Best ...

    wikimili.com/en/List_of_British_royal_residences

    Sep 14, 2020 · British royal residences are palaces, castles and houses occupied by members of the British royal family in the United Kingdom.Some, like Buckingham Palace and Windsor Castle, are owned by the Crown; i.e. ownership by the British monarch is by virtue of his or her position as king or queen, [1] while others like Balmoral Castle and Sandringham House are personally owned [2] and have been ...

  5. Tudor architecture – HiSoUR – Hi So You Are

    www.hisour.com/tudor-architecture-29795

    In the early part of his reign, Henry Tudor favored a site at Sheen, someway down river from London and now known as Richmond Palace, as his primary residence. This had been one of the royal palaces since the reign of Edward II, with the most recent additions as at 1496 being by Henry V in 1414.

    • Early Life
    • Thomas Seymour
    • Mary I's Reign
    • Accession
    • Church Settlement
    • Marriage Question
    • Mary, Queen of Scots
    • Wars and Overseas Trade
    • Later Years
    • Death

    Elizabeth was born at Greenwich Palace and was named after her grandmothers, Elizabeth of York and Elizabeth Howard. She was the second child of Henry VIII of England born in wedlock to survive infancy. Her mother was Henry's second wife, Anne Boleyn. At birth, Elizabeth was the heir presumptive to the throne of England. Her older half-sister, Mary, had lost her position as a legitimate heir when Henry annulled his marriage to Mary's mother, Catherine of Aragon, to marry Anne, with the intent to sire a male heir and ensure the Tudor succession. She was baptised on 10 September 1533; Archbishop Thomas Cranmer, the Marquess of Exeter, the Duchess of Norfolk and the Dowager Marchioness of Dorset stood as her godparents. A canopy was carried at the ceremony over the three-day old child by her uncle Viscount Rochford, Lord Hussey, Lord Thomas Howard, and Lord Howard of Effingham. Elizabeth was two years and eight months old when her mother was beheaded on 19 May 1536, four months after C...

    Henry VIII died in 1547 and Elizabeth's half-brother, Edward VI, became king at age nine. Catherine Parr, Henry's widow, soon married Thomas Seymour, 1st Baron Seymour of Sudeley, Edward VI's uncle and the brother of the Lord Protector, Edward Seymour, 1st Duke of Somerset. The couple took Elizabeth into their household at Chelsea. There Elizabeth experienced an emotional crisis that some historians believe affected her for the rest of her life. Thomas Seymour, approaching age 40 but having charm and "a powerful sex appeal", engaged in romps and horseplay with the 14-year-old Elizabeth. These included entering her bedroom in his nightgown, tickling her and slapping her on the buttocks. Parr, rather than confront her husband over his inappropriate activities, joined in. Twice she accompanied him in tickling Elizabeth, and once held her while he cut her black gown "into a thousand pieces." However, after Parr discovered the pair in an embrace, she ended this state of affairs.In May 15...

    Edward VI died on 6 July 1553, aged 15. His will ignored the Succession to the Crown Act 1543, excluded both Mary and Elizabeth from the succession, and instead declared as his heir Lady Jane Grey, granddaughter of Henry VIII's younger sister, Mary. Jane was proclaimed queen by the Privy council, but her support quickly crumbled, and she was deposed after nine days. On 3 August 1553, Mary rode triumphantly into London, with Elizabeth at her side. The show of solidarity between the sisters did not last long. Mary, a devout Catholic, was determined to crush the Protestant faith in which Elizabeth had been educated, and she ordered that everyone attend Catholic Mass; Elizabeth had to outwardly conform. Mary's initial popularity ebbed away in 1554 when she announced plans to marry Philip of Spain, the son of Holy Roman Emperor Charles V and an active Catholic.Discontent spread rapidly through the country, and many looked to Elizabeth as a focus for their opposition to Mary's religious p...

    Elizabeth became queen at the age of 25, and declared her intentions to her Council and other peers who had come to Hatfield to swear allegiance. The speech contains the first record of her adoption of the medieval political theology of the sovereign's "two bodies": the body natural and the body politic: As her triumphal progress wound through the city on the eve of the coronation ceremony, she was welcomed wholeheartedly by the citizens and greeted by orations and pageants, most with a strong Protestant flavour. Elizabeth's open and gracious responses endeared her to the spectators, who were "wonderfully ravished". The following day, 15 January 1559, a date chosen by her astrologer John Dee, Elizabeth was crowned and anointed by Owen Oglethorpe, the Catholic bishop of Carlisle, in Westminster Abbey. She was then presented for the people's acceptance, amidst a deafening noise of organs, fifes, trumpets, drums, and bells.Although Elizabeth was welcomed as queen in England, the countr...

    Elizabeth's personal religious convictions have been much debated by scholars. She was a Protestant, but kept Catholic symbols (such as the crucifix), and downplayed the role of sermons in defiance of a key Protestant belief. In terms of public policy she favoured pragmatism in dealing with religious matters. The question of her legitimacy was a key concern: although she was technically illegitimate under both Protestant and Catholic law, her retroactively-declared illegitimacy under the English church was not a serious bar compared to having never been legitimate as the Catholics claimed she was. For this reason alone, it was never in serious doubt that Elizabeth would embrace Protestantism. Elizabeth and her advisers perceived the threat of a Catholic crusade against heretical England. Elizabeth therefore sought a Protestant solution that would not offend Catholics too greatly while addressing the desires of English Protestants; she would not tolerate the more radical Puritans tho...

    From the start of Elizabeth's reign, it was expected that she would marry and the question arose to whom. Although she received many offers for her hand, she never married and was childless; the reasons for this are not clear. Historians have speculated that Thomas Seymour had put her off sexual relationships. She considered several suitors until she was about fifty. Her last courtship was with Francis, Duke of Anjou, 22 years her junior. While risking possible loss of power like her sister, who played into the hands of King Philip II of Spain, marriage offered the chance of an heir.However, the choice of a husband might also provoke political instability or even insurrection.

    Elizabeth's first policy toward Scotland was to oppose the French presence there. She feared that the French planned to invade England and put her Catholic cousin Mary, Queen of Scots, on the throne. Mary was considered by many to be the heir to the English crown, being the granddaughter of Henry VIII's elder sister, Margaret. Mary boasted being "the nearest kinswoman she hath". Elizabeth was persuaded to send a force into Scotland to aid the Protestant rebels, and though the campaign was inept, the resulting Treaty of Edinburgh of July 1560 removed the French threat in the north. When Mary returned to Scotland in 1561 to take up the reins of power, the country had an established Protestant church and was run by a council of Protestant nobles supported by Elizabeth.Mary refused to ratify the treaty. In 1563 Elizabeth proposed her own suitor, Robert Dudley, as a husband for Mary, without asking either of the two people concerned. Both proved unenthusiastic, and in 1565 Mary married H...

    Elizabeth's foreign policy was largely defensive. The exception was the English occupation of Le Havre from October 1562 to June 1563, which ended in failure when Elizabeth's Huguenot allies joined with the Catholics to retake the port. Elizabeth's intention had been to exchange Le Havre for Calais, lost to France in January 1558. Only through the activities of her fleets did Elizabeth pursue an aggressive policy. This paid off in the war against Spain, 80% of which was fought at sea. She knighted Francis Drake after his circumnavigation of the globe from 1577 to 1580, and he won fame for his raids on Spanish ports and fleets. An element of piracyand self-enrichment drove Elizabethan seafarers, over whom the queen had little control.

    The period after the defeat of the Spanish Armada in 1588 brought new difficulties for Elizabeth that lasted until the end of her reign. The conflicts with Spain and in Ireland dragged on, the tax burden grew heavier, and the economy was hit by poor harvests and the cost of war. Prices rose and the standard of living fell. During this time, repression of Catholics intensified, and Elizabeth authorised commissions in 1591 to interrogate and monitor Catholic householders. To maintain the illusion of peace and prosperity, she increasingly relied on internal spies and propaganda.In her last years, mounting criticism reflected a decline in the public's affection for her. One of the causes for this "second reign" of Elizabeth, as it is sometimes called, was the changed character of Elizabeth's governing body, the privy council in the 1590s. A new generation was in power. With the exception of Lord Burghley, the most important politicians had died around 1590: the Earl of Leicester in 1588...

    Elizabeth's senior adviser, William Cecil, 1st Baron Burghley, died on 4 August 1598. His political mantle passed to his son, Robert Cecil, who soon became the leader of the government. One task he addressed was to prepare the way for a smooth succession. Since Elizabeth would never name her successor, Cecil was obliged to proceed in secret. He therefore entered into a coded negotiation with James VI of Scotland, who had a strong but unrecognised claim. Cecil coached the impatient James to humour Elizabeth and "secure the heart of the highest, to whose sex and quality nothing is so improper as either needless expostulations or over much curiosity in her own actions". The advice worked. James's tone delighted Elizabeth, who responded: "So trust I that you will not doubt but that your last letters are so acceptably taken as my thanks cannot be lacking for the same, but yield them to you in grateful sort".In historian J. E. Neale's view, Elizabeth may not have declared her wishes openl...

  6. Original Richmond Stock Photos & Original Richmond Stock ...

    www.alamy.com/stock-photo/original-richmond.html

    Elisabeth I, Elizabeth I, Elizabeth Tudor, The Virgin Queen, The Maiden Queen, born September 7, 1533 - March 24, 1603 in Richmond, was Queen of England from November 17, 1558 until the end of her life, here at the age of 13 / Elisabeth I., Elizabeth I, Elizabeth Tudor, The Virgin Queen, The Maiden Queen, war vom 17.

  7. List of public art in the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_public_art_in...

    Image Title / subject Location and coordinates Date Artist / designer Type Designation Notes ; University Boat Race finishing stone: The Riverside, Mortlake: 19th century: More im

  8. Best Palaces or Castles to Visit-London or Adjacent - London ...

    www.tripadvisor.com/ShowTopic-g186338-i17-k...

    Answer 1 of 22: We are feeling a bit overwhelmed with the quantity of castles and palaces available to us for our visit in late September. I'd be interested in the experiences and/or opinion of those here as to the best palaces or castles to tour, either...

  9. World's largest palace - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World's_largest_palace

    The world's largest palace by both floor space and volume is the Palace of the Parliament in Bucharest, Romania, which was built by communist dictator Nicolae Ceaușescu in 1986. It has a floor space of 330,000 m 2 and a volume of 2,550,000 m 3. It is also the most expensive administrative building and heaviest building.

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