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  1. Robert Frost - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Robert_Frost

    Robert Frost was born in San Francisco, California, to journalist William Prescott Frost, Jr., and Isabelle Moodie. His father descended from Nicholas Frost of Tiverton, Devon, England, who had sailed to New Hampshire in 1634 on the Wolfrana, and his mother was a Scottish immigrant.

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    • Elinor Miriam White, ​ ​(m. 1895; died 1938)​
  2. Robert Frost was born on March 26th, 1874. One of the most celebrated poets in America, Robert Frost was an author of searching and often dark meditations on universal themes and a quintessentially modern poet in his adherence to language as it is actually spoken, in the psychological complexity of his portraits, and in the degree to which his work is infused with layers of ambiguity and irony.

  3. Robert Frost - Poems, Life & Quotes - Biography

    www.biography.com › writer › robert-frost
    • Who Was Robert Frost?
    • Early Years
    • Wife
    • Children
    • Early Poetry
    • Public Recognition For Frost’s Poetry
    • Famous Poems
    • Pulitzer Prizes and Awards
    • President John F. Kennedy’s Inauguration
    • Soviet Union Tour

    Robert Frost was an American poet and winner of four Pulitzer Prizes. Famous works include “Fire and Ice,” “Mending Wall,” “Birches,” “Out Out,” “Nothing Gold Can Stay” and “Home Burial.” His 1916 poem, "The Road Not Taken," is often read at graduation ceremonies across the United States. As a special guest at President John F. Kennedy’s inauguration, Frost became a poetic force and the unofficial "poet laureate" of the United States. Frost spent his first 40 years as an unknown. He exploded on the scene after returning from England at the beginning of World War I. He died of complications from prostate surgery on January 29, 1963.

    Frost was born on March 26, 1874, in San Francisco, California. He spent the first 11 years of his life there, until his journalist father, William Prescott Frost Jr., died of tuberculosis. Following his father's passing, Frost moved with his mother and sister, Jeanie, to the town of Lawrence, Massachusetts. They moved in with his grandparents, and Frost attended Lawrence High School. After high school, Frost attended Dartmouth Collegefor several months, returning home to work a slew of unfulfilling jobs. Beginning in 1897, Frost attended Harvard Universitybut had to drop out after two years due to health concerns. He returned to Lawrence to join his wife. In 1900, Frost moved with his wife and children to a farm in New Hampshire — property that Frost's grandfather had purchased for them—and they attempted to make a life on it for the next 12 years. Though it was a fruitful time for Frost's writing, it was a difficult period in his personal life, as two of his young children died. D...

    Frost met his future love and wife, Elinor White, when they were both attending Lawrence High School. She was his co-valedictorian when they graduated in 1892. In 1894, Frost proposed to White, who was attending St. Lawrence University, but she turned him down because she first wanted to finish school. Frost then decided to leave on a trip to Virginia, and when he returned, he proposed again. By then, White had graduated from college, and she accepted. They married on December 19, 1895. White died in 1938. Diagnosed with cancer in 1937 and having undergone surgery, she also had had a long history of heart trouble, to which she ultimately succumbed.

    Frost and White had six children together. Their first child, Elliot, was born in 1896. Daughter Lesley was born in 1899. Elliot died of cholera in 1900. After his death, Elinor gave birth to four more children: son Carol (1902), who would commit suicide in 1940; Irma (1903), who later developed mental illness; Marjorie (1905), who died in her late 20s after giving birth; and Elinor (1907), who died just weeks after she was born.

    In 1894, Frost had his first poem, "My Butterfly: an Elegy," published in The Independent, a weekly literary journal based in New York City. Two poems, "The Tuft of Flowers" and "The Trial by Existence," were published in 1906. He could not find any publishers who were willing to underwrite his other poems. In 1912, Frost and Elinor decided to sell the farm in New Hampshire and move the family to England, where they hoped there would be more publishers willing to take a chance on new poets. Within just a few months, Frost, now 38, found a publisher who would print his first book of poems, A Boy’s Will, followed by North of Bostona year later. It was at this time that Frost met fellow poets Ezra Poundand Edward Thomas, two men who would affect his life in significant ways. Pound and Thomas were the first to review his work in a favorable light, as well as provide significant encouragement. Frost credited Thomas's long walks over the English landscape as the inspiration for one of his...

    When Frost arrived back in America, his reputation had preceded him, and he was well-received by the literary world. His new publisher, Henry Holt, who would remain with him for the rest of his life, had purchased all of the copies of North of Boston. In 1916, he published Frost's Mountain Interval, a collection of other works that he created while in England, including a tribute to Thomas. Journals such as the Atlantic Monthly, who had turned Frost down when he submitted work earlier, now came calling. Frost famously sent the Atlanticthe same poems that they had rejected before his stay in England. In 1915, Frost and Elinor settled down on a farm that they purchased in Franconia, New Hampshire. There, Frost began a long career as a teacher at several colleges, reciting poetry to eager crowds and writing all the while. He taught at Dartmouth and the University of Michigan at various times, but his most significant association was with Amherst College, where he taught steadily during...

    Some of Frost’s most well-known poems include: 1. “The Road Not Taken” 2. “Birches” 3. “Fire and Ice” 4. “Mending Wall” 5. “Home Burial” 6. “The Death of the Hired Man” 7. “Stopping By Woods on a Snowy Evening” 8. “Acquainted with the Night” 9. “Out, Out” 10. “Nothing Gold Can Stay”

    During his lifetime, Frost received more than 40 honorary degrees. In 1924, Frost was awarded his first of four Pulitzer Prizes, for his book New Hampshire. He would subsequently win Pulitzers for Collected Poems (1931), A Further Range (1937) and A Witness Tree(1943). In 1960, Congress awarded Frost the Congressional Gold Medal.

    At the age of 86, Frost was honored when asked to write and recite a poem for President John F. Kennedy's 1961 inauguration. His sight now failing, he was not able to see the words in the sunlight and substituted the reading of one of his poems, "The Gift Outright," which he had committed to memory.

    In 1962, Frost visited the Soviet Union on a goodwill tour. However, when he accidentally misrepresented a statement made by Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchevfollowing their meeting, he unwittingly undid much of the good intended by his visit.

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  4. About Robert Frost | Academy of American Poets

    poets.org › poet › robert-frost

    Robert Frost was born on March 26, 1874, in San Francisco, where his father, William Prescott Frost Jr., and his mother, Isabelle Moodie, had moved from Pennsylvania shortly after marrying. After the death of his father from tuberculosis when Frost was eleven years old, he moved with his mother and ...

  5. Robert Frost | Poetry Foundation

    www.poetryfoundation.org › poets › robert-frost

    Robert Frost was born in San Francisco, but his family moved to Lawrence, Massachusetts, in 1884 following his father’s death. The move was actually a return, for Frost’s ancestors were originally New Englanders, and Frost became famous for his poetry’s engagement with New England locales, identities, and themes.

  6. 100 Famous Poems by Robert Frost

    robertfrost.org › poems

    Birches. Mending Wall. Nothing Gold Can Stay. An Old Man's Winter Night. The Wood Pile. Fire and Ice. Acquainted with the Night. My Butterfly. House Fear.

  7. Famous Quotes by Robert Frost

    www.robertfrost.org › quotes

    Robert Frost Quotes. A poem begins in delight and ends in wisdom. Love is an irresistible desire to be irresistibly desired. Some say the world will end in fire, some say in ice. My sorrow, when she's here with me, thinks these dark days of autumn rain are beautiful as days can be; she loves the bare, the withered tree; she walks the sodden ...

  8. 10 Most Famous Poems By Robert Frost - HistoryTen

    historyten.com › arts › famous-poems-by-robert-frost
    • The Road Not Taken. Poetry Collection: Mountain Interval. Published: 1916. Touted as the most famous poem by Frost, ‘The Road Not Taken’ describes our life’s journey and how we face choices in every step of the way.
    • Stopping By Woods on a Snowy Evening. Published: 1923. This poem is probably the most read poem by Frost and most loved yet most misinterpreted. The poem written in quatrain rhymed iambic tetrameter begins with a wilful entry of the narrator and his exit at the end of the poem.
    • Mending Wall. Started. 5000 BCE. Lasted. 3000 years. End. 100 AD. Major Cities. Sumer, ‘Mending Wall’ is a blank verse poem that commences with natural lines then escalates into ambiguous remarks.
    • Nothing Gold Can Stay. Poetry Collection: New Hampshire. Published: 1923. Although this poem is only an eight liner, it unearths profound meaning when excavated.
  9. Robert Frost’s Poems and Unique Writing Style

    reference.yourdictionary.com › books-literature

    Robert Frost’s Writing Style. Summing up a poet’s entire body of work in a few words is challenging. However, what makes a noted poet like Robert Frost stand out is his typical style and form. Robert Frost’s poetry style could be described as conversational, realistic, rural, and introspective.

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