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  1. Late stage rash in a patient with Rocky Mountain spotted fever. Rash is a common sign in people who are sick with RMSF. Rash usually develops 2-4 days after fever begins. The look of the rash can vary widely over the course of illness.

  2. Rocky Mountain spotted fever - Symptoms and causes

    www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/rocky...

    Early signs and symptoms of Rocky Mountain spotted fever include a severe headache and high fever. A few days later, a rash usually appears on the wrists and ankles. Rocky Mountain spotted fever responds well to prompt treatment with antibiotics.

  3. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever Symptoms and Signs: Causes

    www.emedicinehealth.com/rocky_mountain_spotted...

    Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever Symptoms Unfortunately, the early symptoms of RMSF are nonspecific, such as fever (usually greater than 102 F), chills, nausea , vomiting , headache , muscle pain, and fatigue ; these symptoms are frequently ignored or attributed to other causes.

  4. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever: Symptoms & Signs

    www.medicinenet.com/rocky_mountain_spotted_fever...

    Initial symptoms may include fever, nausea, vomiting, decreased appetite, and muscle aches. A severe headache is characteristic of this disease. Other, later associated signs and symptoms include a skin rash, joint pains, diarrhea, and abdominal pain. Cause of Rocky Mountain spotted fever. Rickettsia rickettsii is the bacteria that causes RMSF.

  5. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever: Pictures and Long-Term Effects

    www.healthline.com/.../rocky-mountain-spotted-fever

    The symptoms of Rocky Mountain spotted fever typically begin between 2 and 14 days after getting a tick bite. Symptoms come on suddenly and usually include: high fever, which may persist for 2 to 3 weeks. chills. muscle aches. headache. nausea. vomiting.

  6. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever | Johns Hopkins Medicine

    www.hopkinsmedicine.org/health/conditions-and...

    Key points about Rocky Mountain spotted fever RMSF is caused by a bacterium that is spread to people by the bite of an infected tick. Symptoms include a rash, fever, headache, decreased appetite, chills, sore throat, confusion, stomach ache, nausea or vomiting, diarrhea, body aches, and sensitivity to light.

    • What are the Symptoms of Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever?
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    • Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever | Bacteria, Signs & Symptoms, Diagnosis and Treatment
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    • Signs of Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever
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  7. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever: See Photos of the Rash

    www.onhealth.com/.../1/rocky_mountain_spotted_fever

    Early symptoms of Rocky Mountain spotted fever usually occur about five to 10 days following the tick bite, and include fever, nausea, vomiting, muscle pain, loss of appetite, and headache. As the disease progresses, symptoms may include rash, abdominal pain, joint pain, and diarrhea.

  8. Rocky Mountain spotted fever: Symptoms and treatment

    www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/317198.php

    Signs of RMSF include: fever. digestive problems, such as nausea, diarrhea, vomiting, or lack of appetite. severe abdominal pain. headache, particularly at the front of the head. muscle aches. a dry cough, sore throat, or both. chest pain that feels worse when coughing, sneezing, or inhaling (known as pleuritic chest pain)

  9. Picture of Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever - WebMD

    www.webmd.com/skin-problems-and-treatments/...

    Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever. The abrupt onset of the disease includes severe headache, fever, chills, arthralgia, and myalgia. After 2–3 days of these constitutional symptoms, erythematous macules erupt on the wrists, hands, forearms,legs, and ankles, as seen in these figures. Lesions then spread to the palms and soles and the trunk.

  10. Rocky Mountain spotted fever - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rocky_Mountain_spotted_fever

    Prognosis. Long-term health problems following acute Rocky Mountain spotted fever infection include partial paralysis of the lower extremities, gangrene requiring amputation of fingers, toes, or arms or legs, hearing loss, loss of bowel or bladder control, movement disorders, and language disorders.