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  1. Rocky mountain fever symptoms in humans

    Answer from 4 sources
    • Initial signs and symptoms of Rocky Mountain spotted fever often are nonspecific and can mimic those of other illnesses:

      • High fever
      • Chills
      • Severe headache
      • Muscle aches
      • Nausea and vomiting
      • Signs and symptoms of RMSF in the early stages can be nonspecific and may resemble those of many other diseases. Initial symptoms may include fever, nausea, vomiting, decreased appetite, and muscle aches. A severe headache is characteristic of...
      • Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is a bacterial infection spread by a bite from an infected tick. It causes vomiting, a sudden high fever around 102 or 103°F, headache, abdominal pain, rash, and muscle aches. RMSF is considered...
      • Other symptoms of Rocky Mountain spotted fever may include loss of appetite, hallucinations, sensitivity to light, eye redness, and excessive thirst.
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  3. Rocky Mountain spotted fever - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rocky_Mountain_spotted_fever

    Jan 10, 2021 · Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is a bacterial disease spread by ticks. It typically begins with a fever and headache, which is followed a few days later with the development of a rash. The rash is generally made up of small spots of bleeding and starts on the wrists and ankles. Other symptoms may include muscle pains and vomiting.

    • 2 to 14 days after infection
    • Early: Fever, headache, Later: Rash
  4. Jan 05, 2021 · Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is a disease caused by a type of bacteria carried by ticks. Causes RMSF is caused by the bacterium Rickettsia rickettsii (R Rickettsii) , which is carried by ticks.

  5. Rocky Mountain spotted fever | UF Health, University of ...

    ufhealth.org/rocky-mountain-spotted-fever

    5 days ago · Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is a disease caused by a type of bacteria carried by ticks. Alternative Names. Spotted fever. Causes. RMSF is caused by the bacterium Rickettsia rickettsii (R Rickettsii), which is carried by ticks. The bacteria spread to humans through a tick bite. In the western United States, the bacteria are carried by ...

  6. Tularemia | ALDF

    www.aldf.com/tularemia
    • What Is Tularemia?
    • Where Is Tularemia Prevalent?
    • Symptoms
    • Diagnosis
    • Treatment

    Tularemia (also known as rabbit fever) is caused by oval-shaped bacteria (coccobacilli) called Francisella tularensis. F. tularensis is transmitted to humans by the bite of infected ticks, deer flies, contact with infected animals or infected carcasses, inhalation of air-borne bacteria, and ingestion of infected food or water. In the summer, most cases come from infected tick bites. In the winter, cases are reported by hunters who trap and skin infected animals. Person-to-person transmission...

    Cases of tularemia have been reported across the United States with a concentration of reports in Missouri, Arkansas, and Oklahoma. From 1990 to 2000, there were 1,368 cases reported in the United States. On average, 124 cases per year were reported during this period of time. A cluster of cases were reported at Martha’s Vineyard (Massachusetts) in 2000. A study published by the journal Emerging Infectious Diseases showed that these cases were associated with landscaping work. Landscape worke...

    Symptoms often appear abruptly three to five days after infection, but can take as long as two weeks to appear. A fever of 38°C to 40°C (100.4°F to 104°F) is the most common symptom. Other symptoms include joint pain, swelling of lymph nodes, headache, chills, dry cough, sore throat, ulcers at the site of infection, sore eyes, weakness, and diarrhea.There are several forms of tularemia, each specific to a particular route of entry by F. tularensis into the body. Ulceroglandular tularemia is t...

    According to the CDC, a clinical diagnosis of F. tularensis can be confirmed by examining stained secretions, exudates, and biopsy specimens. The definitive confirmation of F. tularensis infection is growth of the bacteria in culture.

    The CDC recommends intramuscular and intravenous antibiotic therapy for treatment of tularemia. A more detailed description of dosages recommended by the CDC can be found here. In summary, streptomycin is the recommended drug, with gentamicin serving as an alternative. The CDC recommends that these drugs be administered for 10 days. Both can be used in children and pregnant women.

  7. Rickettsia rickettsii - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rickettsia_rickettsii

    4 days ago · The classic Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever rash occurs in about 90% of patients and develops 2 to 5 days after the onset of fever. The characteristic rash appear as small, flat, pink macules that develop peripherally on the patient's body, such as the wrists, forearms, ankles, and feet.

  8. What Are the Symptoms of Tick Bite Fever? (with pictures)

    www.wise-geek.com/what-are-the-symptoms-of-tick...

    Dec 28, 2020 · Fever and Headache Afflicted people typically also run a fever, usually within a few days of being bitten. Headaches ranging from mild to severe are common as well, leaving sufferers with a general feeling of illness and fatigue.

  9. Ehrlichiosis: MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia

    medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001381.htm

    Jan 05, 2021 · Ehrlichiosis is caused by bacteria that belong to the family called rickettsiae. Rickettsial bacteria cause a number of serious diseases worldwide, including Rocky Mountain spotted fever and typhus. All of these diseases are spread to humans by a tick, flea, or mite bite. Scientists first described ehrlichiosis in 1990.

  10. Tick-borne Relapsing Fever | ALDF

    www.aldf.com/tick-borne-relapsing-fever
    • What Is Tick-Borne Relapsing Fever?
    • Where Is Tick-Borne Relapsing Fever Prevalent?
    • Symptoms
    • Diagnosis
    • Treatment
    • Prevention & Control

    Tick-borne Relapsing Fever (TBRF) is caused by bacterial spirochete species including Borelliahermsii, Borelliaparkerii, or Borelliaturicatae, with Borelliahermsii being the most common causative agent. The bacteria are transmitted by the bite of soft tick Ornithodoros species. These ticks feed primarily at night. The bite of the tick is usually painless and they feed for only 15 to 30 minutes before dropping off. This makes it difficult to detect the ticks on one’s body. The Ornithodoros sof...

    TBRF can occur in most of the western portion of the US (west of the Mississippi River) with most cases occurring west of the Rocky Mountains. Travelers to these endemic states commonly get the disease as well. A high percentage of cases occur among people vacationing in rodent-infested cabins in wooded and mountainous areas.

    Tick-borne relapsing fever is characterized by recurring episodes of fever accompanied by other non-specific symptoms including headaches, muscle pain, joint pain, chills, vomiting, and abdominal pain. Bacterial presence tends to be greater among pregnant women, and may sometimes result in more severe infection. Symptoms tend to develop within 7 days after the tick bite. The symptoms last an average of 3 days (range of 3-7 days) and are then followed by an asymptomatic period (no symptoms pre...

    A definitive diagnosis of TBRF is made by detecting Borrelia spirochetes in the patient’s smears of blood, bone marrow or cerebrospinal fluid. The best time to detect spirochetes in patient blood samples is when the patient is febrile (feverish).

    Symptoms of TBRF often resolve on their own, but treatment with antibiotics can help them resolve much faster. Antibiotics used to treat TBRF include erythromycin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, and penicillin. The current recommended duration of antibiotic therapy is 7 days. Erythromycin or penicillin antibiotics are recommended for use by young children or pregnant women.

    The best way to protect oneself from TBRF is to avoid exposure to rodent and tick-infested dwellings. Homes and vacation cabins should be rodent-proofed and any rodent nesting materials should be removed. Tick exposure can be avoided by fumigating homes with compounds containing permethrins or pyrethrins and using insecticides containing DEET on skin and clothing.

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