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  1. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever | ALDF

    www.aldf.com/rocky-mountain-spotted-fever
    • What Is Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever?
    • Where Is Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever Prevalent?
    • Symptoms
    • Diagnosis
    • Treatment

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is the most serious tick-borne disease in the United States and is caused by Rickettsia rickettsii, a type of bacteria known as rickettsia. These bacteria are transmitted to humans by the bite of certain hard ticks. The two most important species of ticks that can transmit R. rickettsii in the United States are Dermacentor variabilis (the American dog tick) and Dermacentor andersoni (Rocky Mountain wood tick). A third species, Rhipicephalus sanguineus (brow...

    Although first recognized in the late 19th century in the Rocky Mountain region, by 1930s this disease was found to be present in the eastern portion of the country as well. The wood tick (Dermacentor andersoni), one of the main tick vectors is found in the Rocky Mountain states and southwestern Canada. The second major vector is the American dog tick (Dermacentor variabilis). This tick is distributed east of the Rocky Mountains and in some regions along the Pacific Coast. The cayenne tick (A...

    Symptoms of Rocky Mountain spotted fever usually appear 2 to 14 days (average of 7 days) after being bitten by the infected tick. Fever is often the first symptom experienced by patients. The classic triad of fever, rash and tick bite is present among many but not all cases at the initial visit to the physician. Nausea, vomiting, severe headache, muscle pain and lack of appetite are also sometimes reported by patients in the early stage of disease. Other clinical symptoms include abnormal pla...

    Clinical diagnosis of RMSF is based on serological tests including detection of antibody titers via IFA, detection of the bacterial agent via culture or immunohistochemical staining of biopsies, and by detection of bacterial DNA in a clinical specimen via PCR. However, treatment decisions should not be delayed while waiting for confirmation with laboratory results. Patients with a relevant history and symptomology should be treated with the appropriate antibiotic regimen immediately. Since th...

    Upon suspicion of Rocky Mountain spotted fever, treatment should begin immediately. Delay of treatment has been associated with fatal outcomes. Treatment with tetracycline or chloramphenicol antibiotics can be used to treat RMSF. Doxycycline (a tetrycycline) antibiotic is the treatment of choice for both adults and children. However doxycycline is not recommended for use by pregnant women. Current recommendations from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) include doxycycline th...

    • Okla. man diagnosed with Rocky Mountain spotted fever after recent tick bite
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    • Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever
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    • What are the Symptoms of Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever?
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    • Tick-borne diseases rising in Indiana, according to state department of health
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  2. Rocky Mountain spotted fever | UF Health, University of ...

    ufhealth.org/rocky-mountain-spotted-fever

    Nov 17, 2020 · Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is a disease caused by a type of bacteria carried by ticks. Alternative Names. Spotted fever. Causes. RMSF is caused by the bacterium Rickettsia rickettsii (R Rickettsii), which is carried by ticks. The bacteria spread to humans through a tick bite. In the western United States, the bacteria are carried by the wood tick. In the eastern US, they are carried by the dog tick.

  3. Tick-borne Relapsing Fever | ALDF

    www.aldf.com/tick-borne-relapsing-fever
    • What Is Tick-Borne Relapsing Fever?
    • Where Is Tick-Borne Relapsing Fever Prevalent?
    • Symptoms
    • Diagnosis
    • Treatment
    • Prevention & Control

    Tick-borne Relapsing Fever (TBRF) is caused by bacterial spirochete species including Borelliahermsii, Borelliaparkerii, or Borelliaturicatae, with Borelliahermsii being the most common causative agent. The bacteria are transmitted by the bite of soft tick Ornithodoros species. These ticks feed primarily at night. The bite of the tick is usually painless and they feed for only 15 to 30 minutes before dropping off. This makes it difficult to detect the ticks on one’s body. The Ornithodoros sof...

    TBRF can occur in most of the western portion of the US (west of the Mississippi River) with most cases occurring west of the Rocky Mountains. Travelers to these endemic states commonly get the disease as well. A high percentage of cases occur among people vacationing in rodent-infested cabins in wooded and mountainous areas.

    Tick-borne relapsing fever is characterized by recurring episodes of fever accompanied by other non-specific symptoms including headaches, muscle pain, joint pain, chills, vomiting, and abdominal pain. Bacterial presence tends to be greater among pregnant women, and may sometimes result in more severe infection. Symptoms tend to develop within 7 days after the tick bite. The symptoms last an average of 3 days (range of 3-7 days) and are then followed by an asymptomatic period (no symptoms pre...

    A definitive diagnosis of TBRF is made by detecting Borrelia spirochetes in the patient’s smears of blood, bone marrow or cerebrospinal fluid. The best time to detect spirochetes in patient blood samples is when the patient is febrile (feverish).

    Symptoms of TBRF often resolve on their own, but treatment with antibiotics can help them resolve much faster. Antibiotics used to treat TBRF include erythromycin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, and penicillin. The current recommended duration of antibiotic therapy is 7 days. Erythromycin or penicillin antibiotics are recommended for use by young children or pregnant women.

    The best way to protect oneself from TBRF is to avoid exposure to rodent and tick-infested dwellings. Homes and vacation cabins should be rodent-proofed and any rodent nesting materials should be removed. Tick exposure can be avoided by fumigating homes with compounds containing permethrins or pyrethrins and using insecticides containing DEET on skin and clothing.

  4. Deadly ticks bite man, not his best friend, when temperatures ...

    www.malaymail.com/news/life/2020/11/17/deadly...

    Nov 17, 2020 · NEW YORK, Nov 17 — A type of deadly tick that bites dogs is more than twice as likely to feed on humans as temperatures rise, researchers said on Monday, underlining the health risks of climate change. Ticks that cause Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF), which can be fatal, were 2.5 times more...

  5. Warming Planet Ups Risk of Deadly Tick-Borne Fever – Mind ...

    mindbodyhealthiness.com/index.php/2020/11/17/...

    Nov 17, 2020 · Nov. 16, 2020 — Climate change, already linked to more frequent wildfires, longer droughts, and more tropical storms, may also increase the risk of getting the potentially deadly tick-borne disease known as Rocky Mountain spotted fever, new research suggests. When temperatures rise, the brown dog tick, which carries the bacteria causing the disease, is […]

  6. Dog ticks prefer humans as hosts when temperatures rise ...

    foxbangor.com/national-news/dog-ticks-prefer...

    Nov 17, 2020 · Dog ticks prefer humans as hosts when temperatures rise 0 shares As temperatures rise as a result of climate change, ticks carrying the deadly bacterial disease Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) may shift their feeding preferences away from dogs and toward humans, according to new research.

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  8. Tick-borne diseases on rise: Scientists find a possible reason

    www.thehealthsite.com/diseases-conditions/blood...

    Nov 17, 2020 · Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) and other related diseases, known as spotted fever rickettsiosis, are a growing concern in the US. If detected in the first week of infection, the disease can be...

  9. Epidemic typhus - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Epidemic_typhus

    3 days ago · Epidemic typhus is a form of typhus so named because the disease often causes epidemics following wars and natural disasters. Typhus is rare in industrialized countries, and occurs primarily in the colder, mountainous regions of central and east Africa, as well as Central and South America.

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