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    • Roseola - Wikipedia
      • Roseola, also known as sixth disease, is an infectious disease caused by certain types of virus. Most infections occur before the age of three. Symptoms vary from absent to the classic presentation of a fever of rapid onset followed by a rash. The fever generally lasts for three to five days, while the rash is generally pink and lasts for less than three days.
      en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roseola#:~:text=Roseola, also known as sixth disease, is an,pink and lasts for less than three days.
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  2. Roseola - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roseola

    5 days ago · Roseola, also known as sixth disease, is an infectious disease caused by certain types of virus. Most infections occur before the age of three. Symptoms vary from absent to the classic presentation of a fever of rapid onset followed by a rash. The fever generally lasts for three to five days, while the rash is generally pink and lasts for less than three days. Complications may include febrile seizures, with serious complications being rare. It is caused by human herpesvirus 6 or human herpesvir

  3. Rosacea - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rosacea

    5 days ago · Rosacea is a long-term skin condition that typically affects the face. It results in redness, pimples, swelling, and small and superficial dilated blood vessels. Often, the nose, cheeks, forehead, and chin are most involved. A red, enlarged nose may occur in severe disease, a condition known as rhinophyma. The cause of rosacea is unknown. Risk factors are believed to include a family history of the condition. Factors that may potentially worsen the condition include heat, exercise, sunlight, col

    • Unknown
    • Antibiotics either by mouth or applied to the skin
  4. Roseola: MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia

    medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000968.htm

    Nov 03, 2020 · Roseola Roseola is a viral infection that commonly affects infants and young children. It involves a pinkish-red skin rash and high fever.

  5. Fifth disease - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fifth_disease

    5 days ago · The name "fifth disease" comes from its place on the standard list of rash-causing childhood diseases, which also includes measles (first), scarlet fever (second), rubella (third), Dukes' disease (fourth, but is no longer widely accepted as distinct from scarlet fever), and roseola (sixth).

    • virus
    • Red rash, especially on cheeks
    • Slapped cheek syndrome, slapcheek, slap face, slapped face
    • Infectious disease
  6. Measles - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Measles

    5 days ago · The characteristic measles rash is classically described as a generalized red maculopapular rash that begins several days after the fever starts. It starts on the back of the ears and, after a few hours, spreads to the head and neck before spreading to cover most of the body, often causing itching .

    • Fever, cough, runny nose, inflamed eyes, rash
    • Supportive care
  7. Hives - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Urticaria

    Nov 12, 2020 · Pressure or delayed pressure. This type of hives can occur right away, precisely after a pressure stimulus or as a deferred response to sustained pressure being enforced to the skin. In the deferred form, the hives only appear after about six hours from the initial application of pressure to the skin.

  8. Rosella - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rosella

    Nov 17, 2020 · The genus was described by naturalist Nicholas Aylward Vigors in 1825; the name Platycercus derived from the Ancient Greek platukerkos meaning "broad-" or "flat-tailed". The relationships with other parrots have been unclear, with the Australian ringneck (genus Barnardius ) cited as a closest relative by some, and the genus Psephotus by others ...

  9. Scabies - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scabies

    5 days ago · Rash The superficial burrows of scabies usually occur in the area of the finger webs, feet, ventral wrists, elbows, back, buttocks, and external genitals. [16] Except in infants and the immunosuppressed, infection generally does not occur in the skin of the face or scalp.

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