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  1. Roswell incident - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Roswell_UFO_incident
    • Events of July 1947
    • Subsequent Publications and Conspiracy Claims
    • Evidence
    • Presidential Comments
    • Roswell as Myth
    • in Popular Fiction
    • See Also
    • Further Reading

    The Roswell incident occurred amid the flying saucer craze of 1947. On June 26, media nationwide had reported civilian pilot Kenneth Arnold's storyof seeing what he labelled "Flying Saucers". Historians would later chronicle over 800 "copycat" sightings that were reported after the Arnold story was published.

    After 30 years, interest in the Roswell incident surged in the late 1970s. The Roswell incident was featured in films, TV shows, and books. By the 1990s, mainstream political interest resulted in an Air Force report that identified the debris as a Project Mogul balloon. Amid increasingly-complex conspiracy theories, multiple hoaxes and legends about "alien bodies" were incorporated into the Roswell mythos. The trend culminating in 1995's purported footage of an "Alien Autopsy", which filmmakers later revealed to be a hoax (though they preferred the term "reconstruction").

    Although there is no evidence that a UFO crashed at Roswell, believers firmly hold to the belief that one did, and that the truth has been concealed as a result of a government conspiracy.B. D. Gildenberg has called the Roswell incident "the world's most famous, most exhaustively investigated, and most thoroughly debunked UFO claim". Pflock said, "[T]he case for Roswell is a classic example of the triumph of quantity over quality. The advocates of the crashed-saucer tale ... simply shovel everything that seems to support their view into the box marked 'Evidence' and say, 'See? Look at all this stuff. We must be right.' Never mind the contradictions. Never mind the lack of independent supporting fact. Never mind the blatant absurdities."Korff suggests there are clear incentives for some people to promote the idea of aliens at Roswell, and that many researchers were not doing competent work: "[The] UFO field is comprised of people who are willing to take advantage of the gullibility o...

    In a 2012 visit to Roswell, Obama joked "I come in peace", while in December 2020, Obama joked with Stephen Colbert: "It used to be that UFOs and Roswell was the biggest conspiracy. And now that seems so tame, the idea that the government might have an alien spaceship." In a 2014 interview, former President Bill Clinton reported that his administration had investigated the incident, saying "When the Roswell thing came up, I knew we’d get gazillions of letters. So I had all the Roswell papers reviewed, everything". When asked during a 2015 interview with GQ magazine about whether he had looked at top-secret classified information, President Barack Obama replied, "I gotta tell you, it's a little disappointing. People always ask me about Roswell and the aliens and UFOs, and it turns out the stuff going on that's top secret isn't nearly as exciting as you expect. In this day and age, it's not as top secret as you'd think."In June of 2020, then-President Donald Trump, when asked if he wo...

    A June 1997 CNN/Time poll revealed that the majority of people interviewed believed that aliens had indeed visited Earth, and that aliens had landed at Roswell, but that all the relevant information was being kept secret by the US government. According to anthropologists Susan Harding and Kathleen Stewart, the Roswell Story was a prime example of how a discourse moved from the fringes to the mainstream according to the prevailing zeitgeist: public preoccupation in the 1980s with "conspiracy, cover-up and repression" aligned well with the Roswell narratives as told in the "sensational books" which were being published. Additionally, skeptics and some social anthropologistssaw the increasingly elaborate accounts of alien crash landings and government cover-ups as evidence of a myth being constructed. Prominent skeptics Joe Nickell and co-author James McGaha identified a myth-making process, which they called the "Roswellian syndrome". In this syndrome, a myth is proposed to have five...

    In the 1980 film Hangar 18, an alien ship crashes in the desert of the US Southwest. Debris and bodies are recovered, but their existence is covered up by the government. Filmmaker James L. Conways...
    The 1993-2002 TV series The X-Files included the Roswell Incident as a recurring motif, most prominently in My Struggle. The 1996 episode Jose Chung's From Outer Space satirized the Santelli Alien...
    In the 1995 Star Trek: Deep Space Nine episode Little Green Men, protagonists from the 24th century travel back in time and cause the Roswell incident.
    In the 1996 film Independence Day, an alien invasion prompts the revelation of a Roswell crash and cover-up extending even to the President of the United States.

    Books, articles 1. Broad, William J (18 September 1994). "Wreckage in the Desert Was Odd but Not Alien". New York Times. 2. Sobel D (1995). "The truth about Roswell". Omni. 17(8): 90. 3. Frazier, Kendrick; Karr, Barry; Nickell, Joe (1996). The UFO Invasion: The Roswell Incident, Alien Abductions, and Government Coverups. Amherst, N.Y.: Prometheus Books. ISBN 1573921319. Web resources 1. Walker Air Force Base at Roswell online museum

  2. Roswell UFO incident | Military Wiki | Fandom

    military.wikia.org › wiki › Roswell_UFO_incident
    • Contemporary Accounts
    • Witnesses
    • Air Force and Skeptics Respond
    • Developments Since 1990s
    • References
    • External Links

    On June 14, 1947, William Brazel, a foreman working on the Foster homestead, noticed strange clusters of debris approximately 30 miles (50 km) north of Roswell, New Mexico. This date—or "about three weeks" before July 8—appeared in later stories featuring Brazel, but the initial press release from the Roswell Army Air Field (RAAF) said the find was "sometime last week," suggesting Brazel found the debris in early July. Brazel told the Roswell Daily Record that he and his son saw a "large area of bright wreckage made up of rubber strips, tinfoil, a rather tough paper and sticks." He paid little attention to it but returned on July 4 with his son, wife and daughter to gather up the material. Some accounts have described Brazel as having gathered some of the material earlier, rolling it together and stashing it under some brush. The next day, Brazel heard reports about "flying discs" and wondered if that was what he had picked up. On July 7, Brazel saw Sheriff Wilcox and "whispered kin...

    Witness accounts, emergence of alien narratives

    In 1978, nuclear physicist and author Stanton T. Friedman interviewed Jesse Marcel, the only person known to have accompanied the Roswell debris from where it was recovered to Fort Worth where reporters saw material which was claimed to be part of the recovered object. The accounts given by Friedman and others in the following years elevated Roswell from a forgotten incident to perhaps the most famous UFO case of all time. By the early 1990s, UFO researchers such as Friedman, William Moore, K...

    The Roswell Incident

    The first book on the Roswell UFO incident was The Roswell Incident (1980) by Charles Berlitz and William Moore. The authors claimed to have interviewed over ninety witnesses. Though he was uncredited, Friedman carried out some research for the book. The Roswell Incident featured accounts of debris described by Marcel as "nothing made on this earth." Additional accounts by Bill Brazel, son of Mac Brazel, neighbor Floyd Proctor and Walt Whitman Jr., son of newsman W. E. Whitman who had intervi...

    UFO Crash at Roswell

    In 1991, with the benefit of publicity from new witness interviews, Kevin Randle and Donald Schmitt published UFO Crash at Roswell. In this account, the timelines of the incident were slightly altered. The date Brazel when reported the debris and Marcel went to the ranch was said to be Sunday, July 6, not the next day, as some of the original accounts suggested, and The Roswell Incidentleft unclear. Marcel and an unidentified counter-intelligence agent were said to have spent the night at the...

    Air Force reports

    During the mid-1990s, the United States Air Force issued two reports which accounted for the debris that was found and reported on in 1947, and which also accounted for the later reports of alien recoveries. The USAF reports identified the debris as coming from a top-secret government experiment called Project Mogul, which tested the feasibility of detecting Soviet nuclear tests and ballistic missiles with equipment that was carried aloft using high-altitude balloons. Accounts of aliens were...

    Problems with witness accounts

    Hundreds of people were interviewed by the various researchers, but critics point out that only a few of these people claimed to have seen debris or aliens. Most witnesses were repeating the claims of others, and their testimony would be considered hearsay in an American court of law and therefore inadmissible as evidence. Of the 90 people claimed to have been interviewed for The Roswell Incident, the testimony of only 25 appears in the book, and only seven of these people saw the debris. Of...

    Contradictory conclusions, questionable research, Roswell as a myth

    Critics also point out that the large variety of claimed crash flights suggests that events that spanned years have been incorporated into one single event, and that authors have uncritically embraced anything that suggests aliens, even when the accounts contradict each other. Pflock said, "[T]he case for Roswell is a classic example of the triumph of quantity over quality. The advocates of the crashed-saucer tale [...] simply shovel everything that seems to support their view into the box ma...

    Pro-UFO advocates dismiss Roswell incident

    One of the immediate outcomes of the Air Force reports on the Roswell UFO incident was the decision by some prominent UFO researchers to view the Roswell incident as not involving an alien craft. While the initial Air Force report was a chief reason for this, another reason was the release of secret documents from 1948 that showed that top Air Force officials did not know what the UFO objects being reported in the media were, and their suspicion that the UFOs might be Soviet spy vehicles. In...

    Shoddy research revealed; witnesses suspected of hoaxes

    Around the same time in the late 1990s, a serious rift developed between two prominent Roswell authors. Kevin D. Randle and Donald R. Schmitt had co-authored several books on the subject, and were generally acknowledged, along with Stanton Friedman, to be the leading researchers of the Roswell incident. The Air Force reports on the incident suggested that basic research that was claimed to have been carried out was not in fact carried out, a fact verified in a 1995 Omni magazine article. Addi...

    Photo analysis; documentaries; new claims

    UFO researcher David Rudiak, and others before him, claimed that a telegram which appears in one of the 1947 photos of balloon debris in Ramey's office contains text that confirms that aliens and a "disk" were found. Rudiak and some other examiners claim that when enlarged, the text on the paper General Ramey is apparently holding in his hand includes key phrases "the victims of the wreck" and "in/on the 'disc'" plus other phrases seemingly in the context of a crashed vehicle recovery. Howeve...

    Berlitz, Charles; Moore, William (1980). The Roswell Incident. Grosset & Dunlap. ISBN 9780448211992.
    Carey, Thomas; Schmitt, Donald (2007). Witness to Roswell: Unmasking the 60-Year Cover-Up. New Page Books. ISBN 9781564149435.
    Friedman, Stanton; Berliner, Don (1992). Crash at Corona: The U.S. Military Retrieval and Cover-Up of a UFO. Paragon House. ISBN 9781557784490.
    Korff, Kal (1997). The Roswell UFO Crash: What They Don't Want You to Know. Prometheus Books. ISBN 9781573921275.
    Carey, Tom, and Schmitt, Don. UFOlogy Resource Center: The Roswell Report, via SciFi.com. Archived from the originalon April 13, 2004.
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  4. Talk:Roswell incident/Archive 1 - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Talk:Roswell_incident

    The Roswell UFO incident is the crash of an unidentified flying object (UFO) in Roswell, New Mexico, USA, in 1947. Or, if you would prefer to avoid the term [i]UFO[/i] entirely: The Roswell UFO incident is the purported crash of an object in Roswell, New Mexico, USA, in 1947, which some claim to have been a weather balloon or other man-made ...

  5. Roswell - New Mexico, Alien & UFOs - HISTORY

    www.history.com › topics › paranormal
    • The Roswell 'UFO' Incident
    • Dummy Drops and UFOs
    • Roswell and The Mysterious Project Mogul
    • Roswell and 'Flying Saucerism' Today

    One morning around Independence Day 1947, about 75 miles from the town of Roswell, New Mexico, a rancher named Mac Brazel found something unusual in his sheep pasture: a mess of metallic sticks held together with tape; chunks of plastic and foil reflectors; and scraps of a heavy, glossy, paper-like material. Unable to identify the strange objects, Brazel called Roswell’s sheriff. The sheriff, in turn, called officials at the nearby Roswell Army Air Force base. Soldiers fanned out across Brazel’s field, gathering the mysterious debris and whisking it away in armored trucks. WATCH: Full episodes of History's Greatest Mysteriesonline now and tune in for all-new episodes Saturdays at 9/8c. On July 8, “RAAF Captures Flying Saucer on Ranch in Roswell Region” was the top story in the Roswell Daily Record. But was it true? On July 9, an Air Force official clarified the paper’s report: The alleged “flying saucer,” he said, was only a crashed weather balloon. However, to anyone who had seen t...

    These skeptics grew more numerous during the 1950s, when the Air Force conducted a series of secret “dummy drops” over air bases, test ranges and unoccupied fields across New Mexico. These experiments, meant to test ways for pilots to survive falls from high altitudes, sent bandaged, featureless dummies with latex “skin” and aluminum “bones”–dummies that looked an awful lot like space aliens were supposed to–falling from the sky onto the ground, whereupon military vehicles would descend on the landing site to retrieve the “bodies” as quickly as possible. To people who believed the government was covering up the truth about the Roswell landing, these dummy drops seemed just as suspicious. They were convinced that the dummies were actually extraterrestrial creatures who were being kidnapped and experimented on by government scientists. READ MORE: Two Pilots Saw a UFO. Why Did the Air Force Destroy the Report?

    It turned out that the Army knew more about Brazel’s “flying saucer” than it let on. Since World War II, a group of geophysicists and oceanographers from Columbia University, New York University and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution on Cape Cod had been working on a top-secret atomic espionage project at New Mexico’s Alamogordo Air Field that they called Project Mogul. Project Mogul used sturdy high-altitude balloons to carry low-frequency sound sensors into the tropopause, a faraway part of the Earth’s atmosphere that acts as a sound channel. In this part of the atmosphere, sound waves can travel for thousands of miles without interference, much like under the ocean. The scientists believed that if they sent microphones into this sound channel, they would be able to eavesdrop on nuclear tests as far away as the Soviet Union. According to the U.S. military, the debris in Brazel’s field outside Roswell actually belonged to Project Mogul. It was the remains of a 700-foot-long s...

    Today, many people continue to believe that the government and the military are covering up the truth about alien landings at and around Roswell. In 1994, the Pentagondeclassified most of its files on Project Mogul and the dummy drops, and the federal General Accounting Office produced a report (“Report of Air Force Research Regarding the Roswell Incident”) designed to debunk these rumors. Nevertheless, there are still people who subscribe to the UFO theory, and hundreds of thousands of curiosity seekers visit Roswell and the crash site every year, hoping to find out the truth for themselves. Access hundreds of hours of historical video, commercial-free, with HISTORY Vault. Start your free trialtoday.

  6. How the Roswell UFO Theory Got Started - Time

    time.com › 3916193 › roswell-history

    Jul 07, 2015 · How the Roswell UFO Theory Got Started. O dds are, if you’re familiar with the city of Roswell, N.M., you’re familiar with what happened there on this day, July 7, in 1947: a rancher named W.W ...

  7. UFO, Area 51 & Roswell Collectibles for sale | eBay

    www.ebay.com › b › UFO-Area-51-Roswell-Collectibles

    The Roswell Incident Diorama 1997/1947 50th Anniversary by Shadow Box. $95.00. ... Alien A Leon State of Arizona Drivers License Novelty ID Card UFO Roswell. $8.00.

  8. roswell ufo model for sale | eBay

    www.ebay.com › sch › i

    Brand New. 4.5 out of 5 stars. 3 product ratings. - lindberg 91004 ALIEN 7 3/4" from 1947 UFO Crash Roswell model kit new in the box. $49.99. Buy It Now. Free shipping. Watch. Results matching fewer words.

  9. Unidentified flying object - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › UFO

    e. Photograph of a purported UFO in Passaic, New Jersey, taken on July 31, 1952. An unidentified flying object ( UFO) is any aerial phenomenon that cannot immediately be identified or explained. Most UFOs are identified or investigated as conventional objects or phenomena.

  10. What date did the Roswell crash supposedly occur? - Quora

    www.quora.com › What-date-did-the-Roswell-crash

    1947 I am telling you friend if you really research this incident like I did and go deeper than the headlines, you will be very suprised. I am not one of these guys who thinks everything is a conspiracy either, I think most of that stuff is retard...

  11. The Black Vault has more than 2,000,000 pages of declassified U.S. Government documents ready to download on nearly any government secret you can imagine. Utilizing the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), The Black Vault's founder John Greenewald, Jr. has filed more than 8,000 FOIA requests to amass it all.

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