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  1. Roswell incident - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Roswell_UFO_incident
    • Events of July 1947
    • Subsequent Publications and Conspiracy Claims
    • Evidence
    • Presidential Comments
    • Roswell as Myth
    • in Popular Fiction
    • See Also
    • Further Reading

    The Roswell incident occurred amid the flying saucer craze of 1947. On June 26, media nationwide had reported civilian pilot Kenneth Arnold's storyof seeing what he labelled "Flying Saucers". Historians would later chronicle over 800 "copycat" sightings that were reported after the Arnold story was published.

    After 30 years, interest in the Roswell incident surged in the late 1970s. The Roswell incident was featured in films, TV shows, and books. By the 1990s, mainstream political interest resulted in an Air Force report that identified the debris as a Project Mogul balloon. Amid increasingly-complex conspiracy theories, multiple hoaxes and legends about "alien bodies" were incorporated into the Roswell mythos. The trend culminating in 1995's purported footage of an "Alien Autopsy", which filmmakers later revealed to be a hoax (though they preferred the term "reconstruction").

    Although there is no evidence that a UFO crashed at Roswell, believers firmly hold to the belief that one did, and that the truth has been concealed as a result of a government conspiracy.B. D. Gildenberg has called the Roswell incident "the world's most famous, most exhaustively investigated, and most thoroughly debunked UFO claim". Pflock said, "[T]he case for Roswell is a classic example of the triumph of quantity over quality. The advocates of the crashed-saucer tale ... simply shovel everything that seems to support their view into the box marked 'Evidence' and say, 'See? Look at all this stuff. We must be right.' Never mind the contradictions. Never mind the lack of independent supporting fact. Never mind the blatant absurdities."Korff suggests there are clear incentives for some people to promote the idea of aliens at Roswell, and that many researchers were not doing competent work: "[The] UFO field is comprised of people who are willing to take advantage of the gullibility o...

    In a 2012 visit to Roswell, Obama joked "I come in peace", while in December 2020, Obama joked with Stephen Colbert: "It used to be that UFOs and Roswell was the biggest conspiracy. And now that seems so tame, the idea that the government might have an alien spaceship." In a 2014 interview, former President Bill Clinton reported that his administration had investigated the incident, saying "When the Roswell thing came up, I knew we’d get gazillions of letters. So I had all the Roswell papers reviewed, everything". When asked during a 2015 interview with GQ magazine about whether he had looked at top-secret classified information, President Barack Obama replied, "I gotta tell you, it's a little disappointing. People always ask me about Roswell and the aliens and UFOs, and it turns out the stuff going on that's top secret isn't nearly as exciting as you expect. In this day and age, it's not as top secret as you'd think."In June of 2020, then-President Donald Trump, when asked if he wo...

    A June 1997 CNN/Time poll revealed that the majority of people interviewed believed that aliens had indeed visited Earth, and that aliens had landed at Roswell, but that all the relevant information was being kept secret by the US government. According to anthropologists Susan Harding and Kathleen Stewart, the Roswell Story was a prime example of how a discourse moved from the fringes to the mainstream according to the prevailing zeitgeist: public preoccupation in the 1980s with "conspiracy, cover-up and repression" aligned well with the Roswell narratives as told in the "sensational books" which were being published. Additionally, skeptics and some social anthropologistssaw the increasingly elaborate accounts of alien crash landings and government cover-ups as evidence of a myth being constructed. Prominent skeptics Joe Nickell and co-author James McGaha identified a myth-making process, which they called the "Roswellian syndrome". In this syndrome, a myth is proposed to have five...

    In the 1980 film Hangar 18, an alien ship crashes in the desert of the US Southwest. Debris and bodies are recovered, but their existence is covered up by the government. Filmmaker James L. Conways...
    The 1993-2002 TV series The X-Files included the Roswell Incident as a recurring motif, most prominently in My Struggle. The 1996 episode Jose Chung's From Outer Space satirized the Santelli Alien...
    In the 1995 Star Trek: Deep Space Nine episode Little Green Men, protagonists from the 24th century travel back in time and cause the Roswell incident.
    In the 1996 film Independence Day, an alien invasion prompts the revelation of a Roswell crash and cover-up extending even to the President of the United States.

    Books, articles 1. Broad, William J (18 September 1994). "Wreckage in the Desert Was Odd but Not Alien". New York Times. 2. Sobel D (1995). "The truth about Roswell". Omni. 17(8): 90. 3. Frazier, Kendrick; Karr, Barry; Nickell, Joe (1996). The UFO Invasion: The Roswell Incident, Alien Abductions, and Government Coverups. Amherst, N.Y.: Prometheus Books. ISBN 1573921319. Web resources 1. Walker Air Force Base at Roswell online museum

  2. Roswell UFO incident | Military Wiki | Fandom

    military.wikia.org › wiki › Roswell_UFO_incident
    • Contemporary Accounts
    • Witnesses
    • Air Force and Skeptics Respond
    • Developments Since 1990s
    • References
    • External Links

    On June 14, 1947, William Brazel, a foreman working on the Foster homestead, noticed strange clusters of debris approximately 30 miles (50 km) north of Roswell, New Mexico. This date—or "about three weeks" before July 8—appeared in later stories featuring Brazel, but the initial press release from the Roswell Army Air Field (RAAF) said the find was "sometime last week," suggesting Brazel found the debris in early July. Brazel told the Roswell Daily Record that he and his son saw a "large area of bright wreckage made up of rubber strips, tinfoil, a rather tough paper and sticks." He paid little attention to it but returned on July 4 with his son, wife and daughter to gather up the material. Some accounts have described Brazel as having gathered some of the material earlier, rolling it together and stashing it under some brush. The next day, Brazel heard reports about "flying discs" and wondered if that was what he had picked up. On July 7, Brazel saw Sheriff Wilcox and "whispered kin...

    Witness accounts, emergence of alien narratives

    In 1978, nuclear physicist and author Stanton T. Friedman interviewed Jesse Marcel, the only person known to have accompanied the Roswell debris from where it was recovered to Fort Worth where reporters saw material which was claimed to be part of the recovered object. The accounts given by Friedman and others in the following years elevated Roswell from a forgotten incident to perhaps the most famous UFO case of all time. By the early 1990s, UFO researchers such as Friedman, William Moore, K...

    The Roswell Incident

    The first book on the Roswell UFO incident was The Roswell Incident (1980) by Charles Berlitz and William Moore. The authors claimed to have interviewed over ninety witnesses. Though he was uncredited, Friedman carried out some research for the book. The Roswell Incident featured accounts of debris described by Marcel as "nothing made on this earth." Additional accounts by Bill Brazel, son of Mac Brazel, neighbor Floyd Proctor and Walt Whitman Jr., son of newsman W. E. Whitman who had intervi...

    UFO Crash at Roswell

    In 1991, with the benefit of publicity from new witness interviews, Kevin Randle and Donald Schmitt published UFO Crash at Roswell. In this account, the timelines of the incident were slightly altered. The date Brazel when reported the debris and Marcel went to the ranch was said to be Sunday, July 6, not the next day, as some of the original accounts suggested, and The Roswell Incidentleft unclear. Marcel and an unidentified counter-intelligence agent were said to have spent the night at the...

    Air Force reports

    During the mid-1990s, the United States Air Force issued two reports which accounted for the debris that was found and reported on in 1947, and which also accounted for the later reports of alien recoveries. The USAF reports identified the debris as coming from a top-secret government experiment called Project Mogul, which tested the feasibility of detecting Soviet nuclear tests and ballistic missiles with equipment that was carried aloft using high-altitude balloons. Accounts of aliens were...

    Problems with witness accounts

    Hundreds of people were interviewed by the various researchers, but critics point out that only a few of these people claimed to have seen debris or aliens. Most witnesses were repeating the claims of others, and their testimony would be considered hearsay in an American court of law and therefore inadmissible as evidence. Of the 90 people claimed to have been interviewed for The Roswell Incident, the testimony of only 25 appears in the book, and only seven of these people saw the debris. Of...

    Contradictory conclusions, questionable research, Roswell as a myth

    Critics also point out that the large variety of claimed crash flights suggests that events that spanned years have been incorporated into one single event, and that authors have uncritically embraced anything that suggests aliens, even when the accounts contradict each other. Pflock said, "[T]he case for Roswell is a classic example of the triumph of quantity over quality. The advocates of the crashed-saucer tale [...] simply shovel everything that seems to support their view into the box ma...

    Pro-UFO advocates dismiss Roswell incident

    One of the immediate outcomes of the Air Force reports on the Roswell UFO incident was the decision by some prominent UFO researchers to view the Roswell incident as not involving an alien craft. While the initial Air Force report was a chief reason for this, another reason was the release of secret documents from 1948 that showed that top Air Force officials did not know what the UFO objects being reported in the media were, and their suspicion that the UFOs might be Soviet spy vehicles. In...

    Shoddy research revealed; witnesses suspected of hoaxes

    Around the same time in the late 1990s, a serious rift developed between two prominent Roswell authors. Kevin D. Randle and Donald R. Schmitt had co-authored several books on the subject, and were generally acknowledged, along with Stanton Friedman, to be the leading researchers of the Roswell incident. The Air Force reports on the incident suggested that basic research that was claimed to have been carried out was not in fact carried out, a fact verified in a 1995 Omni magazine article. Addi...

    Photo analysis; documentaries; new claims

    UFO researcher David Rudiak, and others before him, claimed that a telegram which appears in one of the 1947 photos of balloon debris in Ramey's office contains text that confirms that aliens and a "disk" were found. Rudiak and some other examiners claim that when enlarged, the text on the paper General Ramey is apparently holding in his hand includes key phrases "the victims of the wreck" and "in/on the 'disc'" plus other phrases seemingly in the context of a crashed vehicle recovery. Howeve...

    Berlitz, Charles; Moore, William (1980). The Roswell Incident. Grosset & Dunlap. ISBN 9780448211992.
    Carey, Thomas; Schmitt, Donald (2007). Witness to Roswell: Unmasking the 60-Year Cover-Up. New Page Books. ISBN 9781564149435.
    Friedman, Stanton; Berliner, Don (1992). Crash at Corona: The U.S. Military Retrieval and Cover-Up of a UFO. Paragon House. ISBN 9781557784490.
    Korff, Kal (1997). The Roswell UFO Crash: What They Don't Want You to Know. Prometheus Books. ISBN 9781573921275.
    Carey, Tom, and Schmitt, Don. UFOlogy Resource Center: The Roswell Report, via SciFi.com. Archived from the originalon April 13, 2004.
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  4. What Really Happened at Roswell? - HISTORY

    www.history.com › news › roswell-ufo-aliens-what
    • Here Are The Agreed-Upon Facts About The Roswell crash.
    • The Government Changed Its Story About The Roswell ‘Saucer’—A Few times.
    • Was Roswell’s ‘UFO’ from The USSR?

    Sometime between mid-June and early July 1947, rancher W.W. “Mac” Brazel found wreckage on his sizable property in Lincoln County, New Mexico, approximately 75 miles north of Roswell. Several “flying disc” and “flying saucer” stories had already appeared in the national press that summer, leading Brazel to believe the wreckage—which included rubber strips, tinfoil, and thick paper—might be something of that ilk. He brought some of the material to Sheriff George Wilcox of Roswell, who in turn brought it to the attention of Colonel William Blanchard, the commanding officer of the Roswell Army Air Field (RAAF). The next day, the RAAF released a statement, writing that, “The many rumors regarding the flying disc became a reality yesterday when the intelligence office of the 509th Bomb Group of the Eighth Air Force, Roswell Army Air Field, was fortunate enough to gain possession of a disc through the cooperation of one of the local ranchers and the sheriff's office of Chaves County.” Acc...

    The following day, the Roswell Daily Record ran a storyabout the crash and the RAAF’s astonishing claim. But U.S. Army officials quickly reversed themselves on the “flying saucer” claim, stating that the found debris was actually from a weather balloon, releasing photographs of Major Marcel posing with pieces of the supposed weather balloon debris as proof. For decades, many UFO researchers were skeptical of the government’s changed account, and in 1994, the U.S. Air Force released a report in which they conceded that the “weather balloon” story had been bogus. According to the 1994 explanation, the wreckage came from a spy device created for an until-then classified project called Project Mogul. The device—a connected string of high-altitude balloons equipped with microphones—was designed to float furtively over the USSR, detecting sound waves at a stealth distance. These balloons would ostensibly monitor the Soviet government’s attempts at testing their own atomic bomb. Because Pr...

    Another questionable theory—advanced by the book Area 51: An Uncensored History of America’s Top Secret Military Base—states that the crashed flying vehicle was neither extraterrestrial nor the work of U.S. spies. Rather, it was an unconventional plan to induce widespread American panic, implemented by Soviet strongman Joseph Stalin. An unnamed source who worked as an engineer at Area 51 for the defense contractor EG&G told the book’s author Annie Jacobsen, a veteran national security journalist and Pulitzer Prize nominee, that the program had been designed by Nazi concentration camp doctor Josef Mengele. According to the source, adolescent children were deformed by the Soviets to resemble aliens and then deployed in an aircraft to fly over New Mexico. According to this book, Stalin’s “plan was for the children to climb out and be mistaken for visitors from Mars. Panic would ensue… [and] America’s early-warning radar system would be overwhelmed with sightings of other ‘UFOs.’” That...

    • 5 min
  5. 1979 Topps Football Cards - PSA SMR Price Guide

    www.psacard.com › 1979-topps › 700

    Notes about 1979 Topps. A PSA Gem Mint 10 #390 Campbell sold for $2,901 in 2008 and $3,748 in 2015. A PSA Gem Mint 10 #480 Payton sold for $1,350 in 2012. A PSA Gem Mint 10 #310 Lofton sold for $2,327 in 2013. A PSA Gem Mint 10 #469 Dallas Cowboys card sold for $515 in 2014.

  6. 1979 Topps Football Cards - 12 Most Valuable - Wax Pack Gods

    waxpackgods.com › 1979-topps-football-cards

    Aug 25, 2019 · 1979 Topps Staubach/Bradshaw (#1) The 1978 season concluded with a Super Bowl that pitted Staubach’s Cowboys against Bradshaw’s Steelers. The result was an MVP trophy and a fourth ring for Bradshaw. Just a few months later, this card kicked off the 1979 Topps set, celebrating the passing leaders from 1978 — yep, Bradshaw and Staubach.

  7. The Roswell UFO Incident Full Story & Hidden Facts | Stillunfold

    stillunfold.com › bizarre-weird › the-roswell-ufo

    Here is the list of some unknown facts about Roswell UFO Incident that are rarely known. 1. It was 75 miles north of Roswell, when a United States Air Force balloon crashed near Roswell, New Mexico in the mid of 1947. 2. William Brazel a foreman noticed the remains of the crash approx 50 kms in north of Roswell, New Mexico. 3.

  8. UFO, Area 51 & Roswell Collectibles for sale | eBay

    www.ebay.com › b › UFO-Area-51-Roswell-Collectibles

    UFO Extra-Terrestrial Roswell Area 51 Outer Space Alien Sculpture. $52.50. $16.95 shipping. or Best Offer. 23 watching.

  9. The 1974 Topps Football Card Set includes 528 standard size cards, which were issued in one series. The subsets for the 1974 Topps football cards are the All-Pro selections (121-144), league leaders (328-333), and playoff highlights (460-463). The key 1974 Topps Rookie card is #105 Ahmad Rashad..

  10. The 1978 Topps Football Card Set includes 528 standard size cards, which measure 2½" by 3½". The subsets for the 1978 Topps Football Card Set are the season highlights (1-6), playoff highlights (166-168), league leaders (331-336), and team leaders (501-528).This set was issued in one series.

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