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    • History of scarlet fever

      • Scarlet fever is a bacterial infection that can occur after strep throat. Like cholera, scarlet fever epidemics came in waves. During the 1858 epidemic, 95 percent of people who caught the virus were children.
      www.healthline.com/health/worst-disease-outbreaks-history#:~:text=Scarlet%20fever%20is%20a%20bacterial%20infection%20that%20can,of%20people%20who%20caught%20the%20virus%20were%20children.
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  2. Scarlet fever - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scarlet_fever

    Scarlet fever is a disease resulting from a group A streptococcus (group A strep) infection, also known as Streptococcus pyogenes. The signs and symptoms include a sore throat, fever, headaches, swollen lymph nodes, and a characteristic rash. The rash is red and feels like sandpaper and the tongue may be red and bumpy.

  3. Scarlet fever | pathology | Britannica

    www.britannica.com/science/scarlet-fever

    Scarlet fever, also called scarlatina, acute infectious disease caused by group A hemolytic streptococcal bacteria, in particular Streptococcus pyogenes. Scarlet fever can affect people of all ages, but it is most often seen in children. It is called scarlet fever because of the red skin rash that accompanies it.

  4. History & Origin of Scarlet Fever - Video & Lesson Transcript ...

    study.com/.../history-origin-of-scarlet-fever.html

    Historically, strep throat was often a precursor to scarlet fever. Strep throat is caused by an infection of Group A Streptococcus, a type of bacterium that makes you sick. Certain strains of...

    • 7 min
  5. The History of Scarlet,deaths,quarantine,children,symptoms,states Scarlet fever,caused by a form of streptococcus.

  6. Scarlet fever--past and present | ScienceBlogs

    scienceblogs.com/.../06/scarlet-fever-in-hong-kong

    Jul 06, 2011 · Scarlet fever is nothing new to humanity, though the earliest case definition of scarlet fever is a matter of contention. Some researchers attest that descriptions of disease which match scarlet...

  7. Scarlet fever–past and present – Aetiology

    aetiologyblog.com/2011/07/06/scarlet-fever-in-hong-kong

    Jul 06, 2011 · Scarlet fever is nothing new to humanity, though the earliest case definition of scarlet fever is a matter of contention. Some researchers attest that descriptions of disease which match scarlet fever date back almost 2,500 years, to Hippocrates.

  8. Scarlet fever, scourge of the 19th century, is coming back ...

    www.independent.co.uk/life-style/health-and...

    Scarlet fever caused devastating epidemics through the 19th and early 20th centuries, and killed almost5 per cent of those infected in 1914. Sufferers were isolated for weeks and their clothes and...

  9. Nov 29, 2019 · Scarlet fever is a bacterial infection caused by group A Streptococcus or “group A strep.” The classic symptoms of the disease are a sore throat and a certain type of red rash that feels rough, like sandpaper. Although anyone can get scarlet fever, it is most common in children ages 5 through 15 years old.

  10. Scarlet fever - Symptoms and causes - Mayo Clinic

    www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/scarlet...
    • Overview
    • Symptoms
    • Causes
    • Risk Factors
    • Complications
    • Prevention

    Scarlet fever is a bacterial illness that develops in some people who have strep throat. Also known as scarlatina, scarlet fever features a bright red rash that covers most of the body. Scarlet fever is almost always accompanied by a sore throat and a high fever.Scarlet fever is most common in children 5 to 15 years of age. Although scarlet fever was once considered a serious childhood illness, antibiotic treatments have made it less threatening. Still, if left untreated, scarlet fever can re...

    The signs and symptoms that give scarlet fever its name include: 1. Red rash. The rash looks like a sunburn and feels like sandpaper. It typically begins on the face or neck and spreads to the trunk, arms and legs. If pressure is applied to the reddened skin, it will turn pale. 2. Red lines. The folds of skin around the groin, armpits, elbows, knees and neck usually become a deeper red than the surrounding rash. 3. Flushed face. The face may appear flushed with a pale ring around the mouth. 4...

    Scarlet fever is caused by the same type of bacteria that cause strep throat. In scarlet fever, the bacteria release a toxin that produces the rash and red tongue.The infection spreads from person to person via droplets expelled when an infected person coughs or sneezes. The incubation period — the time between exposure and illness — is usually two to four days.

    Children 5 to 15 years of age are more likely than are other people to get scarlet fever. Scarlet fever germs spread more easily among people in close contact, such as family members or classmates.

    If scarlet fever goes untreated, the bacteria may spread to the: 1. Tonsils 2. Lungs 3. Skin 4. Kidneys 5. Blood 6. Middle earRarely, scarlet fever can lead to rheumatic fever, a serious condition that can affect the: 1. Heart 2. Joints 3. Nervous system 4. Skin

    There is no vaccine to prevent scarlet fever. The best prevention strategies for scarlet fever are the same as the standard precautions against infections: 1. Wash your hands. Show your child how to wash his or her hands thoroughly with warm soapy water. 2. Don't share dining utensils or food. As a rule, your child shouldn't share drinking glasses or eating utensils with friends or classmates. This rule applies to sharing food, too. 3. Cover your mouth and nose. Tell your child to cover his o...

  11. The Worst Outbreaks in U.S. History

    www.healthline.com/health/worst-disease...

    Mar 24, 2020 · 1858: Scarlet fever also came in waves Scarlet fever is a bacterial infection that can occur after strep throat. Like cholera, scarlet fever epidemics came in waves. Scarlet fever most commonly...