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  1. Sigismund - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sigismund

    Sigismund Korybut (c. 1395-c. 1435), Lithuanian duke who participated in Hussite Wars Sigismund II, Prince of Anhalt-Dessau (died after 1452) Sigismund, Archduke of Austria (1427–1496), ruler of Further Austria

  2. Sigismund Korybut was a duke from the Gediminid dynasty, best known as a military commander of the Hussite army and a governor of Bohemia and Prague during the Hussite Wars.

  3. Jan Žižka - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jan_Žižka

    After the departure of Sigismund Korybut, the city of Hradec Králové refused to recognize Bořek as its ruler, due to the democratic party gaining the upper hand. They called Žižka to its aid. He acceded to the demand and defeated the Utraquists under Bořek at the farm of Strachov , near the city of Hradec Králové on August 4, 1423.

    • John the One-Eyed, Žižka of the Chalice
    • 11 October 1424 (aged 63–64), Přibyslav, Kingdom of Bohemia
  4. Sigismund Korybut - WikiVisually

    wikivisually.com/wiki/Sigismund_Korybut

    Sigismund Korybut was a duke from the Gediminid dynasty, best known as a military commander of the Hussite army and a governor of Bohemia and Prague during the Hussite Wars. Sigismund was most born in Novhorod-Siverskyi to Dymitr Korybut , son of Algirdas, Grand Duke of Lithuania , Anastasia, daughter of Grand Prince Oleg of Ryazan , raised in ...

  5. prince Sigismund Korybut (c.1373 - 1435) - Genealogy

    www.geni.com/people/prince-Sigismund-Korybut/...

    Sigismund son of Karybut was brought up at the royal court of his uncle Jagiello. Sigismund participated in the battle of Grunewald. Subsequently, he proved himself as a commander, participated in the Hussite Wars, was the viceroy of the Czech kingdom. In 1431, Sigismund, elected by the Hussites to the Bohemian throne.

  6. Sigismund: | |Sigismund| (variants: |Sigmund|, Siegmund) is a German proper name, meaning "protection ... World Heritage Encyclopedia, the aggregation of the largest online encyclopedias available, and the most definitive collection ever assembled.

  7. Jan Žižka | Military Wiki | Fandom

    military.wikia.org/wiki/Jan_Žižka
    • Grunwald
    • Rise to Prominence
    • Hussite Crusades
    • Civil War
    • in Popular Culture
    • Sources
    • References

    Žižka was on the winning side of the Battle of Grunwald, also called the 1st Battle of Tannenberg, one of the largest battles in Medieval Europe. It was fought on July 15, 1410, during the Polish–Lithuanian–Teutonic War. The alliance of the Kingdom of Poland and the Grand Duchy of Lithuania, led respectively by King Jogaila (Władysław Jagiełło) and Grand Duke Vytautas (Witold), decisively defeated the Teutonic Knights, led by Grand Master Ulrich von Jungingen. Most of the Teutonic Knights' leadership were killed or taken prisoner. The Knights never recovered their former power and the financial burden of war reparationscaused internal conflicts and an economic downturn in their lands. The battle shifted the balance of power in Eastern Europe.

    Žižka's name first became prominent during the Hussite Wars. The Hussites were a Christian movement following the teachings of Czech priest, philosopher, reformer, and master at Charles University in Prague, Jan Hus (c. 1369–1415). On November 13, 1419 a temporary armistice was concluded between the partisans of King Sigismund, the last Emperor of the House of Luxemburg and the citizens of Prague. Žižka disapproved of this compromise and left Prague for Plzeň, one of the richest cities of the kingdom with his followers, but soon left that city. On March 25, 1420 he defeated the partisans of Sigismund at Sudoměř, the first pitched battle of the Hussite wars. He later arrived at Tábor, the then-recently established stronghold of the Hussite movement. The ecclesiastical organization of Tabor had a somewhat puritanical character with a very strict military discipline being instituted though the government was established on a thoroughly democratic basis. Žižka took a large part in the o...

    The Hussite Wars became one of the forerunners of the Protestant Reformation and though predominantly a religious movement it was also propelled by social issues and strengthened Czech national awareness. The Catholic Church deemed Hus' teachings heretical. He was excommunicated in 1411, condemned by the Council of Constance, and burned at the stake in 1415. The wars proper began in July 1419, with the First Defenestration of Prague, when protesting Hussites threw the town councillors from the windows of the New Town Hall. It has been reputed that King Wenceslaus IVwas so stunned by the defenestration that he died from the shock shortly after on 16 August 1419. This led to the armed conflict in which Žižka would earn his fame.

    Early in 1423, internal dissent among the Hussites led to civil war. Žižka, as leader of the Taborites, defeated the men of Prague and the Utraquist nobles at Hořice on April 20. Shortly afterwards came news that a new crusade against Bohemia was being prepared. This induced the Hussites to conclude an armistice at Konopiště on June 24. As soon as the crusaders had dispersed, internal dissent broke out anew. During his temporary rule over Bohemia, Prince Sigismund Korybut of Lithuania had appointed Bořek, the lord of Miletínek, governor of the city of Hradec Králové. Bořek belonged to a moderate Hussite faction, the Utraquist party. After the departure of Sigismund Korybut, the city of Hradec Králové refused to recognize Bořek as its ruler, due to the democratic party gaining the upper hand. They called Žižka to its aid. He acceded to the demand and defeated the Utraquists under Bořek at the farm of Strachov, near the city of Hradec Králové on August 4, 1423. Žižka now attempted to...

    Žižka appears as one of the main characters in the Armed Garden graphic novella (The Armed Garden and Other Stories) by David B. (Author).

    Count Lutzow, The Hussite Wars, J. M. Dent & Sons London, E. P. Dutton & Co. New York (1909).
    Höfler, Konstantin, Geschichtsquellen Böhmens.
    Heymann, Frederick G. (1969), John Zizka & the Hussite Revolution, Russell & Russell New York (1955).
    Turnbull, Stephen, The Hussite Wars (1419-36), Osprey Publishing. ISBN 1-84176-665-8.

    This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain: Chisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911) Encyclopædia Britannica(11th ed.) Cambridge University Press

  8. Hussite Wars | Infoplease

    www.infoplease.com/.../wars-battles/hussite-wars

    John Zizka , the Hussite military leader, expelled Sigismund in 1420 and routed him again at Kutna Hora in 1422. From 1419 to 1436, Bohemia had no effective king, although Witowt of Lithuania was elected (1421) antiking and sent his nephew, Sigismund Korybut, to Bohemia as his vicar. Korybut took the crown in 1424 and held it until 1427.

  9. HUSSITE WARS PDF

    aronco.net/hussite-wars-73

    Jul 25, 2019 · Sigismund Korybut, however, huszite a short time in Bohemia, as in he was called to come back to Lithuania, after Jagiello had made a treaty with Sigismund. Nondenominational churches House churches. The Holy Sacrament is to be given freely in both kinds to all Christians in Bohemia and Moravia, and to those elsewhere who adhere to the faith of ...

  10. The attitude of Sigismund, Holy Roman Emperor, who sent threatening letters to Bohemia declaring that he would shortly drown all Wycliffites and Hussites, greatly incensed the people. Trouble broke out in various parts of Bohemia, and drove many Catholic priests from their parishes.