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  1. Analysis: Chapters 12–13. Dill’s absence from Maycomb coincides appropriately with the continued encroachment of the adult world upon Scout’s childhood, as Dill has represented the perspective of childhood throughout the novel. Scout’s journey to Calpurnia’s church is the reader’s first glimpse of the Black community in Maycomb ...

    • Chapters 9–11

      Summary: Chapter 9. At school, Scout nearly starts a fight...

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  2. A summary of Part X (Section6) in Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird. Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of To Kill a Mockingbird and what it means. Perfect for acing essays, tests, and quizzes, as well as for writing lesson plans.

  3. Chapters 12 & 13. “‘It’s not necessary to tell all you know. It’s not lady-like—in the second place, folks don’t like to have somebody around knowin’ more than they do. It aggravates ’em.’”. “There was a story behind all this, but I had no desire to extract it from her then: today was Sunday, and Aunt Alexandra was ...

  4. Feb 10, 2006 · An illustration of an open book. Books. An illustration of two cells of a film strip. ... Internet Archive Audio. ... To Kill a Mockingbird - Chapter 12 by

  5. Part Two Chapter 12 To Kill a Mockingbird Jem was twelve. He was difficult to live with, inconsistent,moody. His appetite was appalling, and he told me so many times tostop pestering him I ...

  6. Because the book is narrated by an older Scout looking back on her childhood, there are many instances of foreshadowing throughout the book. Jem’s accident On the first page, Scout says that her brother, Jem, broke his arm when he was almost thirteen, then adds, “I maintain that the Ewells started it all, but Jem, who was four years my ...

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  8. The most important theme of To Kill a Mockingbird is the book’s exploration of the moral nature of human beings—that is, whether people are essentially good or essentially evil. The novel approaches this question by dramatizing Scout and Jem’s transition from a perspective of childhood innocence, in which they assume that people are good ...