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  1. List of rulers of Bosnia - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ban_of_Bosnia

    took the title Lord of Bosnia (Bosniae dominus). Ban Mladen II: Šubić: 1312–1322: Paul's eldest son Mladen II Šubić of Bribir. was Lord of Bosnia from 1312–1322. In 1314, Mladen II appoints Stephen II Kotromanić, his former enemy, as vassal in Bosnia.

  2. Bosniaks - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bosniaks

    The Bosnian state was significantly strengthened under the rule (ca. 1318–1353) of ban Stephen II of Bosnia who patched up Bosnia's relations with the Hungarian kingdom and expanded the Bosnian state, in turn incorporating Catholic and Orthodox domains to the west and south; the latter following the conquer of Zahumlje (roughly modern-day ...

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  3. Serbian Empire - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serbian_Empire

    However, this didn't work out because Bosnian nobility and even some of Stephen's own soldiers, unhappy with his rule, started subjecting to Dusan. Dusan soon reached Bobovac, the capital of Bosnia, to which he laid siege. The Bosnian ban fled to Hungary, and Bosnia was left open for Dusan to conquer.

  4. Banate of Bosnia - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bosnian_Banate

    Banate of Bosnia to the south remained independent, but we do not know its rulers, successors of ban Ninoslav. [25] He was inherited by Prijezda II who ruled independently from 1287–1290, but later together with his brother Stephen I Kotromanić .

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  6. Kotromanić dynasty - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_of_Kotromanić

    Stephen II and Vladislav managed to reassert the family's hold on Bosnia, defeating the Šubić family in 1322. In the course of his reign Stephen II expanded the Kotromanić realm to its farthest limits thus far ("from the Sava to the seaside and from the Cetina to the Drina "), doubling Bosnia's territory.

  7. List of rulers of Bosnia - WikiMili, The Free Encyclopedia

    wikimili.com/en/List_of_rulers_of_Bosnia

    This is a list of rulers of Bosnia, containing bans and kings of Medieval Bosnia. Ban was a noble title used in several states in Central and Southeastern Europe between the 7th century and the 20th century, primarily in medieval Croatia and Hungary and their respective predecessor states.

  8. Gerardus Odonis - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gerard_Odonis

    In 1329 John XXII sent him to King Charles I of Hungary and to Ban Stephen II of Bosnia for the purpose of bringing about the extermination of the heretics, largely Patarenes, in these countries. On 5 September 1333, Gerardus and the Dominican Arnauld de Saint-Michel (Arnauldus de S. Michaele) were appointed papal legates to make peace between ...

  9. Talk:Kingdom of Bosnia - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Talk:Kingdom_of_Bosnia

    Stephen Dragutin's daughter, Elizabeth of Serbia, was married to Stephen I, Ban of Bosnia (a title that he may have received by serving as a vassal to the kingdom of Hungary, or by simply wishing to emulate his power); the two were in turn the parents of Vladislaus of Bosnia which would father Tvrtko I of Bosnia, the - by other words - maternal ...

  10. Pelješac - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peljesac

    The turbulent times at the beginning of the 14th century spread across the entire country of Zahumlje. The usurpation by the Branivojević brothers, forced the people of Dubrovnik to fight them in 1326 with the help of Stjepan Kotromanović (Stephen II, Ban of Bosnia). That year, Dubrovnik occupied Ston.

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