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  1. Talk:Denmark/Archive 3 - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Talk:Denmark/Archive_3

    But in the main text "Denmark" is used mostly for the geographic Denmark (minus Greenland etc.), e.g. the section Denmark#Geography_of_Denmark says "Located in Northern Europe, Denmark consists of the peninsula of Jutland and 443 named islands (1,419 islands above 100 square metres (1,100 sq ft) in total). Of these, 72 are inhabited, with the ...

  2. Battle of Hastings – 14th October 1066 | Belfast Child

    belfastchildis.com/2016/10/14/battle-of-hastings...
    • Background
    • English Army and Harold’s Preparations
    • William’s Preparations and Landing
    • Harold Moves South
    • Battle
    • Aftermath

    In 911, French Carolingian ruler Charles the Simple allowed a group of Vikings to settle in Normandy under their leader Rollo. Their settlement proved successful, and they quickly adapted to the indigenous culture, renouncing paganism, converting to Christianity, and intermarrying with the local population. Over time, the frontiers of the duchy expanded to the west. In 1002, King Æthelred II of England married Emma, the sister of Richard II, Duke of Normandy. Their son Edward the Confessorspent many years in exile in Normandy, and succeeded to the English throne in 1042. This led to the establishment of a powerful Norman interest in English politics, as Edward drew heavily on his former hosts for support, bringing in Norman courtiers, soldiers, and clerics and appointing them to positions of power, particularly in the Church. Edward was childless and embroiled in conflict with the formidable Godwin, Earl of Wessexand his sons, and he may also have encouraged Duke William of Normandy...

    The English army was organised along regional lines, with the fyrd, or local levy, serving under a local magnate – whether an earl, bishop, or sheriff. The fyrd was composed of men who owned their own land, and were equipped by their community to fulfil the king’s demands for military forces. For every five hides, or units of land nominally capable of supporting one household, one man was supposed to serve. It appears that the hundred was the main organising unit for the fyrd. As a whole, England could furnish about 14,000 men for the fyrd, when it was called out. The fyrdusually served for two months, except in emergencies. It was rare for the whole national fyrd to be called out; between 1046 and 1065 it was only done three times, in 1051, 1052, and 1065. The king also had a group of personal armsmen, known as housecarls, who formed the backbone of the royal forces. Some earls also had their own forces of housecarls. Thegns, the local landowning elites, either fought with the roya...

    William assembled a large invasion fleet and an army gathered from Normandy and the rest of France, including large contingents from Brittany and Flanders. He spent almost nine months on his preparations, as he had to construct a fleet from nothing.[d] According to some Norman chronicles, he also secured diplomatic support, although the accuracy of the reports has been a matter of historical debate. The most famous claim is that Pope Alexander IIgave a papal banner as a token of support, which only appears in William of Poitiers’s account, and not in more contemporary narratives. In April 1066 Halley’s Cometappeared in the sky, and was widely reported throughout Europe. Contemporary accounts connected the comet’s appearance with the succession crisis in England. William mustered his forces at Saint-Valery-sur-Somme, and was ready to cross the English Channel by about 12 August. But the crossing was delayed, either because of unfavourable weather or to avoid being intercepted by the...

    After defeating his brother Tostig and Harald Hardrada in the north, Harold left much of his forces in the north, including Morcar and Edwin, and marched the rest of his army south to deal with the threatened Norman invasion. It is unclear when Harold learned of William’s landing, but it was probably while he was travelling south. Harold stopped in London, and was there for about a week before Hastings, so it is likely that he spent about a week on his march south, averaging about 27 miles (43 kilometres) per day, for the approximately 200 miles (320 kilometres). Harold camped at Caldbec Hill on the night of 13 October, near what was described as a “hoar-apple tree”. This location was about 8 miles (13 kilometres) from William’s castle at Hastings. Some of the early contemporary French accounts mention an emissary or emissaries sent by Harold to William, which is likely. Nothing came of these efforts. Although Harold attempted to surprise the Normans, William’s scouts reported the E...

    Background and location

    Because many of the primary accounts contradict each other at times, it is impossible to provide a description of the battle that is beyond dispute. The only undisputed facts are that the fighting began at 9 am on Saturday 14 October 1066 and that the battle lasted until dusk. Sunset on the day of the battle was at 4:54 pm, with the battlefield mostly dark by 5:54 pm and in full darkness by 6:24 pm. Moonrise that night was not until 11:12 pm, so once the sun set, there was little light on the...

    Dispositions of forces and tactics

    Harold’s forces deployed in a small, dense formation at the top of steep slope, with their flanks protected by woods and marshy ground in front of them. The line may have extended far enough to be anchored on a nearby stream. The English formed a shield wall, with the front ranks holding their shields close together or even overlapping to provide protection from attack. Sources differ on the exact site that the English fought on: some sources state the site of the abbey, but some newer source...

    Beginning of the battle

    The battle opened with the Norman archers shooting uphill at the English shield wall, to little effect. The uphill angle meant that the arrows either bounced off the shields of the English or overshot their targets and flew over the top of the hill. The lack of English archers hampered the Norman archers, as there were few English arrows to be gathered up and reused. After the attack from the archers, William sent the spearmen forward to attack the English. They were met with a barrage of mis...

    The day after the battle, Harold’s body was identified, either by his armour or marks on his body. His personal standard was presented to William, and later sent to the papacy. The bodies of the English dead, including some of Harold’s brothers and his housecarls, were left on the battlefield,although some were removed by relatives later. The Norman dead were buried in a large communal grave, which has not been found. Exact casualty figures are unknown. Of the Englishmen known to be at the battle, the number of dead implies that the death rate was about 50 per cent of those engaged, although this may be too high. Of the named Normans who fought at Hastings, one in seven is stated to have died, but these were all noblemen, and it is probable that the death rate among the common soldiers was higher. Although Orderic Vitalis’s figures are highly exaggerated,[w]his ratio of one in four casualties may be accurate. Marren speculates that perhaps 2,000 Normans and 4,000 Englishmen were kil...

  3. history of the british line of succession : définition de ...

    dictionnaire.sensagent.leparisien.fr/history+of+the...

    Sweyn II of Denmark (b. 1019) Harold Snr's cousin via uncle Ulf Jarl Harald III of Denmark (b. 1041) Sweyn's son Upon his death, the Witan overuled the succession and Edgar Ætheling , Edward the Confessor 's rightful heir, became king.

  4. QUESTIONS AND ANCESTORS: Valdemar the Great #52ancestors

    questionsandancestors.blogspot.com/2014/05/...

    The pretenders to the throne were: Sweyn III Grathe, son of Eric II Emune, son of Eric I. Canute V, son of Magnus the Strong who was the son of King Niels, who was the brother of Erik I. Valdemar himself held Jutland, at leastSchleswig, as his possession. The civil war lasted the better part of ten years.

  5. Timelines and Soundtracks: Harald Hardrada | Timeline

    timelinesandsoundtracks.blogspot.com/2017/12/...

    Dec 24, 2017 · August 9, 1062 - Nissan River, Halland, Sweden - Battle of Niså - Hardrada's victory agains Sweyn II of Denmark January(?) 1(?), 1064 - ? - Harald Hardrada and King Svein conclude a peace treaty, after fifteen years of war, that preserves the traditional borders of Denmark and Norway

  6. 2016 | Belfast Child | Page 7

    belfastchildis.com/2016/page/7

    Sep 29, 2016 · Another contender was Sweyn II of Denmark, who had a claim to the throne as the grandson of Sweyn Forkbeard and nephew of Cnut, but he did not make his bid for the throne until 1069. Tostig Godwinson ‘s attacks in early 1066 may have been the beginning of a bid for the throne, but threw in his lot with Harald Hardrada after defeat at the ...

  7. Gun - Unionpedia, the concept map

    en.unionpedia.org/Gun

    A gun is a tubular ranged weapon typically designed to pneumatically discharge projectiles that are solid (most guns) but can also be liquid (as in water guns/cannons and projected water disruptors) or even charged particles (as in a plasma gun) and may be free-flying (as with bullets and artillery shells) or tethered (as with Taser guns, spearguns and harpoon guns). 147 relations.

  8. Ezekiel 37 Army : December 2014

    ezekiel31army.blogspot.com/2014_12_01_archive.html

    Harold's elder brother Sweyn was exiled in 1047 after abducting the abbess of Leominster. Sweyn's lands were divided between Harold and a cousin, Beorn. In 1049, Harold was in command of a ship or ships that were sent with a fleet to aid the German Emperor Henry III against Baldwin V, Count of Flanders, who was in revolt against Henry. During this campaign, Sweyn returned to England and attempted to secure a pardon from the king, but Harold and Beorn refused to return any of their lands, and ...

  9. Useful dates in British history - John Owen Smith

    www.johnowensmith.co.uk/histdate/index.htm

    Sveyn I (Sweyn, Swein) of Denmark devastates England: Ethelred pays him 24,000 pounds of silver to stop 1004 Vikings explore the North American coast 1006 Apr 30: The brightest supernova in recorded history appears in the constellation Lupus 1007 King Ethelred pays Sveyn another 36,000 pounds of silver 1010

  10. Let’s leave the EU and join Germany | The Spectator Australia

    www.spectator.com.au/2016/04/lets-leave-the-eu...

    Apr 16, 2016 · Ho, ho. One of my favourite campaigns of WW2 is Germany’s conquest of Denmark. It started at breakfast and the Germans were in Copenhagen for lunch. Some Danes did perish during the invasion…..in old folks’ homes. Something to keep in mind when looking at war statistics.

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