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    • Synth-pop - Wikipedia
      • Synth-pop (short for synthesizer pop; also called techno-pop) is a subgenre of new wave music that first became prominent in the late 1970s and features the synthesizer as the dominant musical instrument.
      en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Synthpop#:~:text=Synth-pop (short for synthesizer pop; also called techno-pop),features the synthesizer as the dominant musical instrument.
  1. Synth-pop - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Synthpop

    Synth-pop is a subgenre of new wave music that first became prominent in the late 1970s and features the synthesizer as the dominant musical instrument. It was prefigured in the 1960s and early 1970s by the use of synthesizers in progressive rock, electronic, art rock, disco, and particularly the "Krautrock" of bands like Kraftwerk. It arose as a distinct genre in Japan and the United Kingdom in the post-punk era as part of the new wave movement of the late 1970s to the mid-1980s. Electronic mus

  2. List of synth-pop artists - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_synth-pop_artists

    Synth-pop (also known as electropop or technopop) is a music genre that uses the synthesizer as the dominant musical instrument. With the genre becoming popular in the late 1970s and 1980s, the following article is a list of notable synthpop acts, listed by the first letter in their name (not including articles such as "a", "an", or "the").

  3. Talk:Synth-pop - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Talk:Synth-pop

    "Synth-pop (short for synthesizer pop; also called techno-pop) is a genre of pop music that became prominent in the late 1970s and was closely associated with new wave music." Of course, we need better references and if those guide us to something different then that is where we should go.

  4. Electronic rock - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Synth_rock

    Electronic rock is a music genre that involves a combination of rock music and electronic music, featuring instruments typically found within both genres. It originates from the late 1960s, when rock bands began incorporating electronic instrumentation into their music. Electronic rock acts usually fuse elements from other music styles, including punk rock, industrial rock, hip hop, techno, and synth-pop, which has helped spur subgenres such as indietronica, dance-punk, and electroclash.

  5. Dance-pop - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dance-pop

    Dance-pop is known for being highly eclectic, having borrowed influences from other genres, which varied by producers, artists and periods. Such include contemporary R&B, house, trance, techno, electropop, new jack swing, funk and pop rock.

  6. Electropop - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electropop

    Electropop is a music genre combining elements of electronic and pop genres. Usually, it is described as a variant of synth-pop with heavy emphasis on its electronic sound. The genre saw a revival of popularity and major influence in the 2000s.

  7. Futurepop - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Futurepop

    Synth-pop. Trance. Cultural origins. Early 1990s. Typical instruments. Electronic. vocals. Futurepop is an electronic music genre, an outgrowth of EBM, that evolved in the late 1990s with groups like VNV Nation, Covenant, and Apoptygma Berzerk.

  8. Synthesizer - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Synthesizer

    In 1983, Yamaha released the first commercially successful digital synthesizer, the Yamaha DX7. Based on frequency modulation (FM) synthesis developed by Stanford University engineer John Chowning, the DX7 remains one of the bestselling synthesizers in history and was the first synthesizer to sell over 100,000 units.

  9. New wave music - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_wave_music

    Powerpop, synth-pop, ska revival, art school novelties and rebranded pub rockers were all sold as "New Wave." —Music critic David Smay writing in 2001 [6] By the end of 1977, "new wave" had replaced "punk" as the definition for new underground music in the UK. [43]

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