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      • Duke of York is a title of nobility in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. Since the 15th century, it has, when granted, usually been given to the second son of English (later British ) monarchs. The equivalent title in the Scottish peerage was Duke of Albany .
      en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duke_of_York#:~:text=Duke%20of%20York%20is%20a%20title%20of%20nobility,the%20Scottish%20peerage%20was%20Duke%20of%20Albany%20.
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  2. Duke of York - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duke_of_York

    Duke of York is a title of nobility in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. Since the 15th century, it has, when granted, usually been given to the second son of English monarchs. The equivalent title in the Scottish peerage was Duke of Albany. However, King George I and Queen Victoria granted the second sons of their eldest sons the titles Duke of York and Albany and Duke of York respectively. Initially granted in the 14th century in the Peerage of England, the title Duke of York has been created

    • Prince Andrew

      Prince Andrew, Duke of York, KG, GCVO, CD, ADC (Andrew...

    • Duke of Albany

      The title "Duke of York and Albany" was granted three times...

  3. The Grand Old Duke of York - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Grand_Old_Duke_of_York

    "The Grand Old Duke of York" is an English children's nursery rhyme, often performed as an action song. The eponymous duke has been argued to be a number of the bearers of that title, particularly Prince Frederick, Duke of York and Albany and its lyrics have become proverbial for futile action. It has a Roud Folk Song Index number of 742.

    • 1642
    • unknown
  4. The Duke of York (sometimes shortened to DOY) is a title of nobility and royalty in the United Kingdom. Dukedom is the highest ranking of royalty before monarch. The wife of the Duke of York is the Duchess of York. The current Duke is Prince Andrew, Duke of York.

  5. Richard of Shrewsbury, Duke of York - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_of_Shrewsbury...

    Richard of Shrewsbury, Duke of York KG (17 August 1473 – c. 1483), was the sixth child and second son of King Edward IV of England and Elizabeth Woodville, born in Shrewsbury. Richard and his older brother, who briefly reigned as King Edward V of England, mysteriously disappeared shortly after Richard III became king in 1483.

  6. Prince Andrew, Duke of York - Simple English Wikipedia, the ...

    simple.wikipedia.org/.../Prince_Andrew,_Duke_of_York

    Prince Andrew, Duke of York, KG, GCVO, CD, ADC (P) (Andrew Albert Christian Edward, born 19 February 1960) is a member of the British Royal Family, the second son of Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh. He has been titled Duke of York since 1986, and is eighth in line to the succession to the throne of the United Kingdom.

  7. Edmund of Langley, 1st Duke of York - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edmund_of_Langley,_1st_Duke...

    Edmund of Langley, 1st Duke of York, KG (5 June 1341 – 1 August 1402) was the fourth surviving son of King Edward III of England and Philippa of Hainault.Like many medieval English princes, Edmund gained his nickname from his birthplace: Kings Langley Palace in Hertfordshire.

  8. Richard of York, 3rd Duke of York - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_of_York,_3rd_Duke...
    • Overview
    • Descent
    • Childhood and upbringing
    • The war in France
    • France again
    • Role in politics before 1450

    Richard of York, 3rd Duke of York, also named Richard Plantagenet, was a leading English magnate, a great-grandson of King Edward III through his father, and a great-great-great-grandson of the same king through his mother. He inherited vast estates and served in various offices of state in Ireland, France, and England, a country he ultimately governed as Lord Protector during the madness of King Henry VI. His conflicts with Henry's wife, Margaret of Anjou, and other members of Henry's court, as

    Richard of York was born on 22 September 1411, the son of Richard, Earl of Cambridge, and his wife Anne Mortimer. Both his parents were descended from King Edward III of England: his father was son of Edmund, 1st Duke of York, fourth surviving son of Edward III, whereas his mother Anne Mortimer was a great-granddaughter of Lionel, Duke of Clarence, Edward's second son. After the death in 1425 of Anne's childless brother Edmund, Earl of March, this ancestry supplied her son Richard, of the House

    Upon the death of the Earl of Cambridge, Richard became a ward of the crown. As he was an orphan, his property was managed by royal officials. Despite his father's plot against the king, along with his provocative ancestry – one which had been used in the past as a rallying point by enemies of the House of Lancaster – Richard was allowed to inherit his family estates without any legal constraints. His considerable lands as duke of York meant that his wardship was a valuable gift of the ...

    As York reached majority, events were unfolding in France which would tie him to the events of the ongoing Hundred Years' War. In the spring of 1434, York attended a great council meeting at Westminster which attempted to conciliate the king's uncles, the dukes of Bedford and Gloucester, over disagreements regarding the conduct of the war in France. Henry V's conquests in France could not be sustained forever, as England either needed to conquer more territory to ensure permanent French subordin

    Henry VI turned to York again in 1440 after peace negotiations failed. He was reappointed Lieutenant of France on 2 July, this time with the same powers that the late Bedford had earlier been granted. As in 1437, York was able to count on the loyalty of Bedford's supporters, including Sir John Fastolf, Sir William Oldhall, and Sir William ap Thomas. He was promised an annual income of £20,000 to support his position. Duchess Cecily accompanied him to Normandy, and his children Edward ...

    York appears to have kept a low profile in English politics before his final return to England, in 1445. King Henry VI seems to have been reluctant to employ York, who was not invited to the first royal council at the end of the regency in November 1437. York returned to England on 20 October 1445 at the end of his five-year appointment in France. He must have had reasonable expectations of reappointment. However, he had become associated with the English in Normandy who were opposed to the poli

  9. House of York - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_of_York

    Edmund of Langley, 1st Duke of York, 1st Earl of Cambridge, KG (5 June 1341 – 1 August 1402) was a younger son of King Edward III of England and Philippa of Hainault, the fourth of their five sons who lived to adulthood.

  10. George VI - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_VI_of_the_United...

    As Duke of York, George bore the royal arms of the United Kingdom differenced with a label of three points argent, the centre point bearing an anchor azure – a difference earlier awarded to his father, George V, when he was Duke of York, and then later awarded to his grandson Prince Andrew, Duke of York. As king, he bore the royal arms undifferenced.