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  1. Johnson Amendment - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johnson_Amendment

    The Johnson Amendment is a provision in the U.S. tax code, since 1954, that prohibits all 501 (c) (3) non-profit organizations from endorsing or opposing political candidates. Section 501 (c) (3) organizations are the most common type of nonprofit organization in the United States, ranging from charitable foundations to universities and churches.

  2. Johnson Amendment - RationalWiki

    rationalwiki.org/wiki/Johnson_Amendment

    Apr 08, 2018 · The amendment was to a bill in the 83 rd Congress, H.R. 8300, which was enacted into law as the Internal Revenue Code of 1954. The amendment was proposed by Senator Lyndon B. Johnson of Texas on July 2, 1954. (Johnson would later serve as President from 1963 to 1969.)

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    What are the implications of the 1954 Johnson Amendment?

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  4. The Johnson Amendment is a provision in the U.S. tax code, since 1954, that prohibits all 501 (c) (3) non-profit organizations from endorsing or opposing political candidates. Section 501 (c) (3) organizations are the most common type of nonprofit organization in the United States, ranging from charitable foundations to universities and churches.

  5. Talk:Johnson Amendment - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Talk:Johnson_Amendment

    The court upheld the IRS's revocation of a church's 501(c)(3) status after it had placed two full-page newspaper ads before the 1992 election urging Christians not to vote for Bill Clinton, finding that the Johnson Amendment (well, it didn't call it that, but it was the law in question) neither required the church to act against its religious ...

  6. The Johnson Amendment of 1954 - FHGH Ministries

    www.fhghministries.org/the-johnson-amendment-of-1954

    Jul 22, 2019 · What later became known as the Johnson Amendment passed with no discussion and only a voice vote. It was actually a bi-partisan amendment, pushed by the GOP and signed off by President Eisenhower. When President Reagan revisited the Tax Code in 1986, it was decided to leave that amendment in there.

  7. How the Johnson Amendment Threatens Churches’ Freedoms ...

    aclj.org/free-speech/how-the-johnson-amendment...

    President Johnson proposed the amendment to the tax code that has greatly restricted the free speech of pastors and churches on July 2, 1954. 100 Cong. Rec. 9604 (daily ed. July 2, 1954). The words “in opposition to” were added in 1986. Ass’n of the Bar of the City of N.Y. v. Comm’r, 858 F.2d 876,879 (2d Cir. 1988).

  8. Churches and the IRS: The Johnson Amendment explained

    www.ajc.com/blog/politics/churches-and-the-irs...

    On July 2, 1954, LBJ quietly slipped in an amendment to a vast congressional rewrite of the tax code that barred non-profit, tax-exempt organizations operating under section 501 (c)3 of the code...

  9. Lighting the Way: The Johnson Amendment Stands Strong against ...

    law.emory.edu/ecgar/content/volume-6/...johnson-amendment...

    The Johnson Amendment, named after its legislative sponsor then-Senator Lyndon B. Johnson, refers to statutory language adopted in 1954 providing that certain tax-exempt organizations may not “participate in, or intervene in (including the publishing or distributing of statements), any political campaign on behalf of (or in opposition to) any candidate for public office.” 4

  10. The Johnson Amendment In 5 Questions And Answers : NPR

    www.npr.org/2017/02/03/513187940/the-johnson...

    Feb 03, 2017 · The Johnson Amendment regulates what tax-exempt organizations such as churches can do in the political arena.

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