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      • Speaker of the House Law and Legal Definition. The Speaker is currently second in line after the Vice President to succeed to the U.S. presidency in the case of death or resignation of the President. The Speaker of the House is ceremonially the highest ranking legislative official in the United States government.
      definitions.uslegal.com/s/speaker-of-the-house/
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  2. Speaker of the house | Definition of Speaker of the house at ...

    www.dictionary.com/browse/speaker-of-the-house

    Speaker of the House The presiding officer of the United States House of Representatives. The Speaker, a member of the House, is elected by a majority party caucus.

  3. Speaker of the house legal definition of Speaker of the house

    legal-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/Speaker...
    • Speaker of The House
    • History and Structure
    • Senate Majority Leader
    • How A Bill Becomes A Law
    • Powers of Congress
    • Apportionment
    • Investigations
    • Committees and Staff

    As the presiding officer of the House of Representatives, the Speaker of the House holds one of the highest positions in Congress. The position is filled at the start of each two-year term in a vote by the full House membership. The selection of the Speaker is generally determined by the majority party, and thus the Speaker is always a leading member of that party. The Speaker's broad powers and privileges allow the majority to control the House's legislative agenda.The significance of the of...

    Between 1774 and 1789, the Continental Congress served as the federal lawmaking body for the 13 American colonies and (after it passed the Declaration of Independence on July 4, 1776) the United States. The Continental Congress proved to be an ineffective national legislature, however, particularly after ratification of its founding constitution, the Articles of Confederation, in 1781. This congress lacked the authority to raise funds from the states and was not adept at the administration of...

    The Senate majority leader has somewhat less official power than the Speaker of the House. This is because the vice president is technically the Senate's presiding officer, a ceremonial position that calls chiefly for casting a vote in the event of a tie. The Senate majority leader's official duties include helping make committee appointments, helping establish a legislative timetable, and directing debate. Notably, in the Senate, these duties usually involve consultation with the leadership...

    Before a federal law can exist in the United States, it must first be introduced as a bill in Congress, and then pass through a series of steps. At any of these steps it may be effectively vetoed, or nullified, if it does not attract a majority of support. As a result, only a small percentage of all bills succeed in becoming laws. In the 103d Congress (1993–95), for example, 8,544 public bills and joint resolutions (generally the same as bills) were introduced, and only 465 became laws.Introd...

    Article I, Section 8, of the Constitution defines the powers of Congress. These include the powers to assess and collect taxes; to regulate commerce, both interstate and with foreign nations; to coin money; to establish post offices and post roads; to establish federal courts inferior to the Supreme Court; to declare war; to establish rules for the government; and to raise and maintain an army and navy.Article I, Section 8, also declares that \\"Congress shall have Power … To make all Laws whic...

    Seats in the Senate are apportioned, or distributed, evenly across the states, with each state receiving two. Seats in the House of Representatives are apportioned between the states on the basis of population, with the most populated states receiving the most representatives and no state receiving less than one. The Constitution requires that a census be conducted every ten years in order to determine the number of seats allotted to each state. An apportionment method called equal proportion...

    The Senate and the House of Representatives, acting together or independently, can authorize investigations, or hearings, to obtain information for use in connection with the exercise of their constitutional powers. Information gathered in congressional hearings helps lawmakers draft legislation and monitor the actions of government. It also informs the public about important issues confronting the nation. Noted congressional investigations have included the teapot dome inquiry in 1923, the 1...

    The work of preparing and considering legislation is done largely by committees of both houses of Congress. The membership of the standing committees of each house is chosen by the political parties in Congress. Committee seats are generally distributed to members of different political parties in a ratio equivalent to party membership in the larger House or Senate. Thus, if a party has two-thirds of the seats in the House, it will have approximately two-thirds of the seats in each House comm...

  4. Speaker of the United States House of Representatives - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Speaker_of_the_United...

    The speaker is the political and parliamentary leader of the House of Representatives, and is simultaneously the House's presiding officer, de facto leader of the body's majority party, and the institution's administrative head. Speakers also perform various other administrative and procedural functions.

  5. Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives | Definition ...

    www.britannica.com/topic/Speaker-of-the-US-House...

    Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives, member of the U.S. House of Representatives, who is elected by the majority party to lead the House.

    no.
    name
    party or faction
    state
    63
    Nancy Pelosi
    Democratic
    California
    62
    Paul Ryan
    Republican
    Wisconsin
    61
    John Boehner
    Republican
    Ohio
    60
    Nancy Pelosi
    Democratic
    California
  6. Speaker of the House: Definition, Role & Duties - Video ...

    study.com/academy/lesson/speaker-of-the-house...

    The Speaker of the House is the leader of the majority party in the House of Representatives. The Speaker is technically supposed to be non-partisan while serving - that is, he's not supposed to...

    • 5 min
  7. About the Speaker of the House of Representatives

    www.thoughtco.com/speaker-of-the-house-of...

    Jul 27, 2019 · The Speaker of the House is second in the line of presidential succession, after the Vice President. The election for Speaker of the House takes place at the beginning of each new congressional session. While the Speaker is designated as the presiding officer of the House, this day-to-day duty is usually assigned to another representative.

  8. Speaker of the House Law and Legal Definition | USLegal, Inc.

    definitions.uslegal.com/s/speaker-of-the-house

    Speaker of the House Law and Legal Definition The Speaker of the House of Representatives refers to the presiding officer of the United States House of Representatives. The Speaker is currently second in line after the Vice President to succeed to the U.S. presidency in the case of death or resignation of the President.

  9. What does the Speaker of the House do?

    theconversation.com/what-does-the-speaker-of-the...

    Apr 13, 2018 · The speaker fills three primary roles. First, they are the most visible and authoritative spokesperson for the majority party in the House. Speakers articulate an agenda and explain legislative...

    • Rachel Caufield
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