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  1. Oct 15, 1989 · They All Laughed,” starring Stratten, drove Bogdanovich into bankruptcy when he attempted to distribute it himself. Only in 1985, with the release of “Mask,” did Bogdanovich recapture ...

    • A Screwball Fairy Tale
    • Personal Themes in Old New York
    • Happiness and Tragedy
    • They All Laughed: Final Thoughts

    However, They All Laughed is a surprisingly good-natured effort and some of the same cadences can be found especially in Charles (John Ritter) and Christy (Coleen Camp) whose conversations mirror those of Howard and Eunice from the earlier picture. Names are swapped with every other sentence while their patter is frantic and harried in a similar manner. This is only one of many reasons garnering a recommendation. Is it wrong to see a bit ofRobert Altman‘s Nashville(1975) in between the lines as well? Perhaps it’s the obvious strain of country music which cuts through the New York scene, of all places. If anything, it plays like a condensed version of the former film, shot on the streets of New York with a skeleton crew and fewer actors. The same fresh near-improvisational feel is present with interweaving narratives. It’s not executed in the same fashion as Altman’s picture, with fewer moving parts and lacking the same brand of weighty commentary underneath the humor. Nevertheless,...

    Of course, I must save the best (subjectively speaking) for last – it’s time to talk about Audrey Hepburn, who gets top billing, and understandably so. Though I barely recognized her at first, behind her shades, she still maintains the same congenial elegance, even in eighties attire. If anything, she’s more grounded. Somehow she almost doesn’t belong here but she didn’t originally belong in Breakfast at Tiffany’s(1961) either, and yet her vulnerability made the movie so special. In fact, it struck me, momentarily, this picture is a full 20 years after Tiffany’sand New York, while it has evolved, still holds a nostalgia about it. Because looking back in time with rose-colored glasses, we cannot help seeing it in such a light — not like the grungy, noisy dump of the here and now. With every one of these characters, there manage to be utterly transparent shades of reality. The details are there if you’re willing to look at them in the most personal light possible. It’s a prime example...

    Due to a lack of commercial success (Bogdanovich tried his luck distributing the film himself unsuccessfully) They All Laughed is considered to be one of the ending markers of The New Hollywood Era (along with Heaven’s Gate). No one can completely blame him for his decision as he was stricken with immense grief at the time. Because of course, the aftermath of such a warm picture was marred with a tragedy of the worst kind: the murder of rising talent, Dorothy Stratten. It proved to be the darkest possible closing note on this story. Then, for New York, a full 20 years after this film came out, The Twin Towers (visible in the opening credits) would be gone. There is so much suffering visible and yet invisible at the same time. Because They All Laughedis a film managing to capture a happy time even if a sobering road was waiting up ahead. Sometimes we need light, frothy movies to remind us of such things. Bogdanovich himself noted at a screening back in 2011, “It was a very loving pic...

    For others on the outside looking in, The Last Picture Show, Paper Moon, or even What’s Up, Doc might gleam with superior film stock. However, it’s not too difficult to understand Bogdanovich‘s own sentiments. This is about as personal as a movie can come even as it’s weaved into a hybrid private eye, screwball tale. It’s not the content speaking, but the moments and happy accidents with friends and people he deeply cherished. This palpable exuberance exuded by the director and his cast is infectious, if also a bit doleful. Bittersweetness has to be one of the most maddening of human emotions. It points to something not yet satiated within us. We are always waiting for the next time we can laugh out loud or better yet the final punchline when we never stop laughing. The tears won’t hurt as much then. For now, we must stay content with the good times we’ve had. For now, our laughter must remain in the past tense. What other unfairly dismissed films deserve to be reevaluated upon gain...

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  3. Jul 18, 2021 · Peter Bogdanovich, interviewed for Harcour Brace Jovanovich’s MOVIES: Conversations with Peter Bogdanovich, 1974, a year before At Long Last Love was released. At every step of the production, Bogdanovich posed immense challenges to himself and to the entire cast and crew.

  4. Slippery as the Dickens: Peter Bogdanovich on "They All Laughed" Peter Sobczynski | 2016-10-14 An interview with director Peter Bogdanovich about 1981's "They All Laughed."

  5. Mar 27, 1986 · Afterward, Hefner remembers, “Peter retreated into editing They All Laughed,” the movie Bogdanovich made with Stratten shortly before her death. “What that must have been like, looking at ...

  6. Jun 14, 2015 · Phantom Halo, directed by Antonia Bogdanovich with Peter Bogdanovich as Executive Producer, opens next week, June 19. “It’s playing at a theater in Burbank and is opening on VOD the same day. There is a trailer on YouTube,” the next generation Bogdanovich reminds, putting the focus back on topic.

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