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      • The word was first recorded in 1867 and popularised by a French composer Edmond Audran who wrote the opera La mascotte, performed in December 1880. The word entered the English language in 1881. However, before this, the terms were familiar to the people of France as a slang word used by gamblers.
      en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mascot
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  2. en.wikipedia.org › wiki › MascotMascot - Wikipedia

    The word 'mascot' originates from the French term 'mascotte' which means lucky charm. This was used to describe anything that brought luck to a household. The word was first recorded in 1867 and popularised by a French composer Edmond Audran who wrote the opera La mascotte, performed in December 1880. The word entered the English language in 1881.

    • History
    • Etymology
    • Choices and Identities
    • Sports Mascots
    • Corporate Mascots
    • School Mascots
    • International Mascots - Olympics and World Expositions
    • Government Mascots
    • in Music
    • See Also

    It was orig­i­nally or­gan­i­sa­tions that first thought of using an­i­malsas a form of mas­cot to bring en­ter­tain­ment and ex­cite­ment for their spec­ta­tors. Be­fore mas­cots were fic­tional icons or peo­ple in suits, an­i­mals were mostly used in order to bring a some­what dif­fer­ent feel to the game and to strike fear upon the ri­valry team...

    The word 'mas­cot' orig­i­nates from the French term 'mas­cotte' which means lucky charm. This was used to de­scribe any­thing that brought luck to a house­hold. The word was first recorded in 1867 and pop­u­larised by a French com­poser Ed­mond Au­dran who wrote the opera La mas­cotte, per­formed in De­cem­ber 1880. The word en­tered the Eng­lish ...

    Often the choice of mas­cot re­flects the de­sired qual­ity; a typ­i­cal ex­am­ple of this is the "fight­ing spirit," in which a com­pet­i­tive na­ture is per­son­i­fied by war­riors or preda­toryan­i­mals. Mas­cots may also sym­bol­ize a local or re­gional trait, such as the Ne­braska Corn­huskers' mas­cot, Her­bie Husker: a styl­ized ver­sion of ...

    See also: Lists of sports mascots: Australian sports, Brazilian football, MLB, NBA, NFL, NHL, Olympics and Paralympics, U.S. colleges (post-secondary)
    See also: Native American mascot controversy, List of sports team names and mascots derived from indigenous peoples

    Mas­cots or ad­ver­tis­ing char­ac­ters are very com­mon in the cor­po­rate world. Rec­og­niz­able mas­cots in­clude Chester Chee­tah, Kee­bler Elf, the Fruit of the Loom Guys, Mickey Mouse, Pizza Pizza Guy for Lit­tle Cae­sars, Rocky the Elf, the Coca-Cola Bear, the NBC Pea­cock, and the NRA's Eddie Eagle. These char­ac­ters are typ­i­cally known ...

    Amer­i­can high schools, col­leges, and even mid­dle and el­e­men­tary schools typ­i­cally have mas­cots. Many col­lege and uni­ver­sity mas­cots started out as live an­i­mals such as bull­dogs and bears, which at­tended sport­ing events. Today mas­cots are usu­ally rep­re­sented by an­i­mated char­ac­ters, cam­pus sculp­tures, and cos­tumed stu­de...

    The mas­cots that are used for the Sum­mer and Win­ter Olympic games are fic­tional char­ac­ters, typ­i­cally a human fig­ure or an an­i­mal na­tive to the coun­try to which is hold­ing that year's Olympic Games. The mas­cots are used to en­tice an au­di­ence and bring joy and ex­cite­ment to the Olympics fes­tiv­i­ties. Sam and Sey­more D. Fair fr...

    Yuru-chara

    In Japan, many mu­nic­i­pal­i­ties have mas­cots, which are known as Yuru-chara (Japan­ese: ゆるキャラ Hep­burn: yuru kyara). Yuru-chara is also used to refer to mas­cots cre­ated by busi­nesses to pro­mote their products.

    NASA mascot

    Camilla Corona SDO is the mis­sion mas­cot for NASA's Solar Dy­nam­ics Ob­ser­va­tory(SDO) and as­sists the mis­sion with Ed­u­ca­tion and Pub­lic Out­reach (EPO).

    Military mascots

    Mas­cots are also pop­u­lar in mil­i­tary units. For ex­am­ple, the United States Ma­rine Corps uses the Eng­lish Bull­dog as its mas­cot, while the United States Army uses the mule, the United States Navy uses the goat, and the United States Air Force uses the Gyr­fal­con. The goat in the Royal Welsh is of­fi­cially not a mas­cot but a rank­ing sol­dier. Lance Cor­po­ral William Wind­sor re­tired on 20 May 2009, and a re­place­ment is ex­pected in June. Sev­eral reg­i­ments of the British Ar...

    Some bands, par­tic­u­larly in the heavy metal genre use band mas­cots to pro­mote their music. The mas­cots are usu­ally found on album cov­ers or mer­chan­dise such as band T-shirts, but can also make ap­pear­ances in live shows or music videos. A fa­mous ex­am­ple of a band mas­cot is Eddie of the Eng­lish heavy metal band Iron Maiden. Eddie is ...

  3. April 1, 1999. ( 1999-04-01) –. May 1, 2000. ( 2000-05-01) George and Martha is a series of children's books written and illustrated by James Marshall between 1972 and 1988. Each book in the series contains five short stories describing interactions between two hippos, George and Martha. The books inspired an animated children's television ...

    • 26 (52 segments)
    • "Perfidia" by Mambo All-Stars
    • April 1, 1999 –, May 1, 2000
    • YTV, HBO Family
    • Etymology
    • Choices and Identities
    • Sports Mascots
    • Corporate Mascots
    • International Mascots - Olympics and World Expositions
    • NASA Mascot
    • Military Mascots
    • Mascots in Music
    • See Also
    • External Links

    The word mascot has been traced back to a dialectal use in Provence and Gascony in France, where it was used to describe anything which brought luck to a household.The French word "mascotte" (Provençal version: "mascoto") means talisman, charm, and is derivative of the word "masco" meaning sorceress. The word was first popularized in 1880, when Fre...

    File:03092012Borrego plata15.jpg Often the choice of mascot reflects a desired quality; a common example of this is the "fighting spirit," in which a competitive nature is personified by warriors or predatoryanimals. Mascots may also symbolize a local or regional trait, such as the Nebraska Cornhuskers' mascot, Herbie Husker: a stylized version of ...

    See also: Lists of sports mascots: Australian sports, Brazilian football, MLB, NBA, NFL, NHL, Olympics and Paralympics, U.S. colleges (post-secondary)
    See also: Native American mascot controversy, List of sports team names and mascots derived from indigenous peoples

    Mascots or advertising characters are very common in the corporate world. Recognizable mascots such as Chester Cheetah, Keebler Elf, Fruit of the Loom Guys, Pizza Pizza Guy for Little Caesars, Rocky the Elf, Coca Cola Bear, and the NBC Peacock. These characters are typically known without even having to refer to the company or brand. This is an exa...

    Sam (Olympic mascot), 1984 US Summer Olympics and Seymore D. Fair, 1984 Louisiana World Exposition are examples of international mascots.

    Camilla Corona SDO is the mission mascot for NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory(SDO) and assists the mission with Education and Public Outreach (EPO).

    Mascots are also popular in military units. For example, the United States Marine Corps uses the bald eagle as a formal emblem; the bulldogis also popularly associated with the U.S. Marines. The goat in the Royal Welsh is officially not a mascot but a ranking soldier. Lance Corporal William Windsor retired on 20 May 2009, and a replacement is expec...

    Some bands, particularly in the heavy metal genre use band mascots to promote their music. The mascots are usually found on album covers or merchandise such as band T-shirts, but can also make appearances in live shows or music videos. A famous example of a band mascot is Eddie the Head of the English heavy metal band Iron Maiden. Eddie is a zombie...

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