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  1. Truck classification - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Truck_classification

    The Class 8 truck gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) is a vehicle with a GVWR exceeding 33 000 lb (14 969 kg). These include tractor trailer tractors, single-unit dump trucks of a GVWR over 33,000 lb, as well as non-commercial chassis fire trucks; such trucks typically have 3 or more axles.

  2. Ford F-Series (medium duty truck) - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Ford_F-650

    The medium-duty version of the Ford F-Series is a range of commercial trucks manufactured by Ford since 1948. Derived from the smaller F-Series pickup trucks, the medium-duty range is currently in its eighth generation. Initially slotted between the F-Series pickup trucks and the "Big Job" conventionals, later generations were slotted below the ...

    • 1948–present
    • medium-duty and heavy-duty truck (Class 6, 7, 8)
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    What are the classes of medium duty trucks?

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  4. List of truck types - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › List_of_truck_types

    Medium trucks are larger than light but smaller than heavy trucks. In the US, they are defined as weighing between 14 001– 26 000 lb (6 351– 11 793 kg) . In North America, a medium-duty truck is larger than a heavy-duty pickup truck or full-size van.

  5. Freightliner Business Class M2 - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Freightliner_Business_Class_M2

    The Freightliner Business Class M2 is a model range of medium-duty trucks produced by Freightliner. In production since June 2002, the M2 is the successor to the FL-Series introduced in the 1990s. In terms of size, the M2 is produced in Class 5 through Class 8 GVWR ratings, competing primarily against the International Durastar and the Ford F ...

    • 2-door daycab, 2-door extended cab, 4-door crewcab
    • Class 5-8
  6. Ford F-Series - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Ford_F-Series
    • First Generation
    • Second Generation
    • Third Generation
    • Fourth Generation
    • Fifth Generation
    • Sixth Generation
    • Seventh Generation
    • Eighth Generation
    • Ninth Generation
    • Tenth Generation

    The first-generation F-Series pickup (known as the Ford Bonus-Built) was introduced in 1948 as a replacement for the previous car-based pickup line introduced in 1942. The F-Series was sold in eight different weight ratings, with pickup, panel truck, cab-over engine (COE), conventional truck, and school bus chassis body styles.

    For the 1953 model year, Ford introduced a second generation of the F-Series trucks. Increased dimensions, improved engines, and an updated chassis were features of the second generation. In another change, the model nomenclature of the F-Series was expanded to three numbers; this remains in use in the present day. The half-ton F-1 became the F-100 (partially influenced by the North American F-100 Super Sabre)[citation needed]; the F-2 and F-3 were combined into the 3⁄4-ton F-250 while the F-4 became the one-ton F-350. Conventional F-Series trucks were F-500 to F-900; COE chassis were renamed C-Series trucks. While the cabs, doors, radiator support, inner fenders and hoods are the same from 1953–1956 F-100 & F-250s (the fenders varied on F-250, F-350, F-500 and long boxes were only available on F-250), in 1956 the cab underwent a major revision. Centered around a wraparound windshield, the cab was given new doors, a redesigned dashboard, and an (optional) panoramic rear window. In l...

    Introduced in 1957, the third generation F-series was a significant modernization and redesign. Front fenders became integrated into the body, and the new Styleside bed continued the smooth lines to the rear of the pickup. The cab-over F-Series was discontinued, having been replaced by the tilt-cab C-Series. In 1959, Ford began in-house production of four-wheel-drive pickups.

    Ford introduced a dramatically new style of pickup in 1961 with the fourth generation F-Series. Longer and lower than its predecessors, these trucks had increased dimensions and new engine and gearbox choices. Additionally, the 1961–1963 models offered an optional unibody design with the cab and bed integrated. The traditional separate cab/bed was offered concurrently. The unibody proved unpopular, and Ford discontinued the option after the 1963 model year. In 1965, the F-Series was given a significant mid-cycle redesign. A completely new platform, including the "Twin I-Beam" front suspension, was introduced and would continue to be used until 1996 on the F-150 and until 2016 on the F-250/350 4x2. Additionally, the Ranger name made its first appearance in 1965 on a Ford pickup; previously the Ranger denoted a base model of the Edsel but starting in 1965, it would be used to denote a high-level styling package for F-Series pickups.

    Introduced in 1967, the fifth generation F-series pickup was built on the same platform as the 1965 revision of the fourth generation. Dimensions and greenhouse glass were increased, engine options expanded, and plusher trim levels became available during the fifth generation's production run. Suspension components from all 1969 F-Series models are completely interchangeable.

    The sixth generation F-series was introduced in 1973. This version of the F-series continued to be built on the 1965 fourth generation's revised platform, but with significant modernization and refinements, including front disc brakes, increased cabin dimensions, full double wall bed construction and increased use of galvanized steel. The FE engine series was discontinued in 1976 after a nearly 20-year run, replaced by the more modern 335 & 385 series engines. In 1975, the F-150 was introduced in between the F-100 and the F-250 in order to avoid certain emission control restrictions. For 1978, square headlights replaced the previous models' round ones on higher trim package models, such as Lariat and Ranger, and in 1979 became standard equipment. Also for 1978, the Ford Bronco was redesigned into a variant of the F-series pickup. 1979 was the last year that the 460 engine was available in a half ton truck.

    The seventh-generation F-Series was introduced for 1980, marking the first ground-up redesign of the model line since 1965. Alongside an all-new chassis, the pickup trucks received a completely new body. While distinguished by straighter body lines, the aerodynamics of the exterior were optimized to improve fuel economy. Sharing their cab structure with F-Series pickup trucks, medium-duty trucks (F-600 through F-800) underwent their first redesign since 1967. The powertrain line of this generation underwent multiple revisions through its production. At its launch, the engine line was largely carried over from 1979. While the 7.5L V8 was dropped entirely, a 4.2L V8 was introduced as the smallest V8 engine. For 1982, a 3.8L V6 became the standard engine for the F-100. For 1983, to improve the fuel efficiency of the model line, the M-Series engines (the 5.8L 351M and 6.6L 400 V8s) were dropped; the latter was replaced by the return of the 7.5L V8. In response to low demand and poor per...

    The eighth-generation F-Series was introduced for 1987 as a major revision of the 1980–1986 generation. While the cab was carried over, many body panels were revised, including a completely new front fascia; the interior also underwent a redesign. The long-running Flareside bed design was retired, with all examples produced with Styleside beds. Following the 1986 transition of the 5.0L V8 to fuel injection, the 4.9L I6 followed suit for 1987, with the 5.8L and 7.5L engines doing so for 1988; the F-Series became the first American pickup truck model line sold without carbureted engines. The same year, the 6.9L diesel V8 was increased in size to 7.3L. Following the discontinuation of the 3-speed manual, a 5-speed manual became standard equipment (a 4-speed remained a special-order option until 1989). For 1989, an E4OD4-speed automatic (overdrive version of the C6 heavy-duty 3-speed) was introduced. Slotted between the F-350 and F-600, the F-Super Duty was introduced in 1987; an ancest...

    The ninth-generation F-Series was introduced for 1992 as the second redesign of the 1980 F-Series architecture. Adapting design elements from the newly introduced Explorer and redesigned E-Series and Ranger, the F-Series received a slightly lower hoodline, rounding the front fenders, bumper, and grille. Coinciding with a redesign of the interior, the F-Series received a driver-side airbag. After a six-year hiatus, the FlareSide bed made its return, becoming a sub-model of the F-150. To appeal to younger buyers, the bodywork of the FlareSide bed was modernized, adapting the fenders of a dual rear-wheel F-350 to a single rear-wheel chassis. To commemorate the 75th anniversary of the first Ford factory-produced truck (the 1917 Ford Model TT), Ford offered a 75th anniversary package on its 1992 F-series, consisting of a stripe package, an argent colored step bumper, and special 75th anniversary logos. In response to the Chevrolet 454SS pickup truck, Ford introduced the SVT Lightning, po...

    For the 1997 model year, Ford made a substantial change to the F-Series range of trucks, splitting its pickup line into two vehicle families. From the 1970s to the 1990s, pickup trucks had transitioned in usage. Alongside vehicles designed exclusively for work use, the market segment saw a major increase in demand for dual-purpose vehicles for both work and personal use, effectively serving as a second car. To further expand its growing market share, Ford sought to develop vehicles for both types of buyers, repackaging the F-150 in a more contemporary design (as a larger version of the Ranger) while retaining the heavier-duty F-250 and F-350 for customers interested in a work-use vehicle. The tenth-generation F-Series was introduced in January 1996 as a 1997 model. Initially released solely as the F-150, a higher-GVWR F-250 was released in 1997. The model line was marketed alongside its predecessor, pared down to the F-250HD and F-350; for 1999, these were replaced by the Super Duty...

    • Ford Lobo (Mexico, 1992–present)
    • Full-size pickup truck
    • 1948–present
    • Ford
  7. Ford Super Duty - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Ford_Super_Duty
    • Background
    • First Generation
    • Second Generation
    • Third Generation
    • Fourth Generation
    • Variants
    • See Also
    • External Links

    Previous use of name

    In 1958, Ford introduced the Super Duty family of V8 engines. Built specifically for trucks, the 401, 477, and 534 cubic-inch gasoline V8s were the largest-block V8 engines ever built by Ford Motor Company (other than the 1100 cu in GAA, developed for the US Army as a tank powerplant; this however was a 'cut-down' V-12, with a 60° V-angle, and was not originally designed as a V-8), and were the largest mass-produced gasoline V8 engines in the world. To showcase the engine launch, the "Big Job...

    F-Series change

    Following the redesign of the 1997 Ford F-150, the Ford F-Series began a transition in its layout. In response to the changing demographics of pickup truck purchases during the 1980s and 1990s, Ford shifted the design of the F-150 separate from the larger F-250 and F-350 (which remained in production). While still a full-size pickup under the skin, to expand its appeal among consumers, the F-150 adopted carlike aerodynamics and convenience features. To market a truck that appealed towards com...

    Beginning production in early 1998 for the 1999 model (the 1998 model year was skipped), the Ford F-Series Super Duty consisted of the F-250 pickup truck, F-350 pickup truck and chassis cab, and introduced the F-450 and F-550 chassis cab trucks (see below). The Super Duty trucks would be produced with three cab configurations: two-door standard cab, 2+2 door SuperCab, and four-door crew cab. The SuperCab configuration of the Super Duty marked the introduction of two standard rear-hinged doors on the extended cab, a feature also adopted by the F-150 and Ranger/Mazda B-Series for 1999. The standard cab pickup was produced with an 8-foot bed; SuperCab and crew cabs were produced with a 6 3/4-foot bed, with an 8-foot bed optional. Chassis cab models came with more and different bed length and wheelbase options, but with the same cabs. Two-wheel drive was standard, with four-wheel drive as an option; on F-350 pickup trucks, a dual rear-wheel axle was optional with either drive configurat...

    The second-generation Super Duty was supposed to debut for model year 2007, but quality issues pushed it back to the 2008 model year. It features an all-new 6.4 L, 390.5 cu in Power Stroke Diesel V8 with piezo fuel injectors and sequential turbos to replace the problematic 6.0 L Power Stroke single-turbo Diesel V8. The new engine produces 350 hp (260 kW) and 650 ft⋅lbf (880 N⋅m) of torque.The vehicle had its first official showing at the Texas State Fair in 2006. Ford started taking orders in January 2007. The first 2008 F-450 pickup sold to the public, was delivered to Randy Whipple of Muskegon, Michigan in February 2007. Located near the same dash area as the last generation (but slightly to the right and more directly below the radio), this generation of Super Duty has the same Ford TowCommand TBC (Trailer Brake Controller) and 4 AUX Upfitter switches as the last generation set-up. There is an optional concealed slide-out step and swing-up hand grab bar in the rear tailgate for e...

    The Super Duty line received a large exterior upgrade that includes a new, bigger front fascia. Its engines were also upgraded to better compete with the new Silverado HD and Ram HD. Ford stated in the 2011 Chicago Auto Show that the 2011 trucks have the thickest gauge steel frame of any Heavy Duty truck, this was due to frame being the same design that debuted in 1999. The 2011 Ford F-Series Super Duty was awarded Truckin's "Topline Pulling Power" award for 2011. It also won Popular Mechanics best workhorse of 2011, and the best "Gear of the Year" in the trucks category. The F-450 is able to tow 24,400 pounds (11,100 kg) and has a maximum payload of 4,920 pounds (2,230 kg). The F-350 has a maximum 21,600 pounds (9,800 kg) of towing capacity and 3,770–4,600 pounds (1,710–2,090 kg) of payload depending on configuration. Each engine is mated to a 6R140 heavy-duty TorqShift six-speed automatic transmission.The Ford F-250, the F-350 and the F-450 all come with trim levels including the...

    On September 24, 2015, Ford unveiled the 2017 Ford Super Duty line at the 2015 State Fair of Texas. This marks the first all-new Super Duty line since their 1998 debut, the frame is made from 95% high strength steel and the body (like the F-150) is made from 6000 series aluminum alloy, advertised as a high-strength military grade aluminum alloy. For the first time since 1999, both the Super Duty and F-150 lines are constructed using the same cabto better compete with GM, Ram and Nissan's HD trucks. In a major departure, the stand-alone front grille and stepped front fenders seen since 1998 were eliminated from the exterior. The 2-bar grille introduced in 2011 was widened, integrating the headlights into its design. In a switch to an aluminum-intensive body similar to the F-150, Ford created a potential 700 lbs (318 kg) of weight savings; in spite of the addition of heavier-duty frame and driveline components, the 2017 Super Duty weighs in at up to 350 lbs (159 kg) less than comparab...

    Medium-duty trucks

    In 2000, Ford returned to the Class 6-7 truck market as it expanded the Super Duty line into the medium-duty segment. They developed a joint venture with Navistar Internationalknown as Blue Diamond Trucks, the F-650 and F-750 Super Duty were assembled in Mexico. While the chassis and other components would be common to both manufacturers, Ford and International would each source their own bodywork and powertrain; the cab for the Ford trucks would be common with other Super Duty models. For th...

    Sport-utility vehicles

    From 2000 to 2005, the F-250 Super Duty served as a basis for the Ford Excursion sport-utility vehicle. Along with Chevrolet Suburban (and its Cadillac/GMC/Holden counterparts) and the International Harvester Travelall, the Ford Excursion was one of the longest non-limousine sport-utility vehicles ever sold. The Excursion was available in three trim packages, XLT, Limited, and top-of-the-line Eddie Bauer. It was offered in two or four wheel drive, and with three engine options: the 5.4L V8, t...

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