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  1. Types of stress test

    Answer from 3 sources
      • There are many different types of stress tests, including: Dobutamine or Adenosine Stress Test: This test is used in people who are unable to exercise. Stress echocardiogram: An echocardiogram (often called "echo") is a graphic outline of the heart's movement.
      • ^Types of nuclear stress test A nuclear stress test measures blood flow to your heart at rest and while your heart is working harder as a result of exertion or medication. The test provides images that can show areas of low blood flow through the heart and damaged heart muscle.
      mayoclinic.org/tests-procedure...
      • ^Types of chemical stress test The main types of chemical used for chemical stress tests are dobutamine, adenosine and dipyridamole (brand name Persantine). Dobutamine is an intravenous (IV) medication that causes the heart to pump faster and it is often used in conjunction with an ECG or echo.
      www.womens-health-advice.com/h...
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  3. Five types of cardiac stress tests—they are not all the same ...

    alight.com › five-types-of-cardiac-stress-tests

    The stress could be either walking very fast on an inclined treadmill or injection with drugs that stress the heart. The drugs typically used are dobutamine, persantine or adenosine. If a drug is used to stress the heart, it is referred to as a chemical stress test. The "Test" is how the function of the heart is measured.

  4. Stress Tests: MedlinePlus Medical Test

    medlineplus.gov › lab-tests › stress-tests

    What happens during a stress test? There are three main types of stress tests: exercise stress tests, nuclear stress tests, and stress echocardiograms. All types of stress tests may be done in a health care provider's office, outpatient clinic, or hospital. During an exercise stress test:

  5. Types | Stanford Health Care

    stanfordhealthcare.org › s › stress-test

    Nuclear stress test This type of stress test includes radioactive dye and imaging studies to show blood flow to the heart, both at rest and when your heart rate is elevated. As with other types of stress tests, we record your heart’s electrical activity with an EKG.

  6. Stress Test | 4 Types, Procedure, Risk Factors, Results

    washingtonlifesciences.com › 2021/03/24 › types-and

    Mar 24, 2021 · 4. Nuclear stress test. This type of stress test includes a radioactive dye and imaging studies to show blood flow to the heart, both at rest and when the heart rate is elevated. As with other types of stress tests, we record the electrical activity of your heart with an EKG.

  7. Types of Cardiac Stress Tests | Why Doctors Might Do a Stress ...

    www.healthgrades.com › right-care › heart-health

    Apr 17, 2020 · The most basic type of stress test is a stress ECG. It’s also the most common type. An ECG, or EKG, measures your heart’s electrical activity. To take the ECG, medical staff will connect painless electrodes to your chest and body.

  8. Stress test - Mayo Clinic

    www.mayoclinic.org › tests-procedures › stress-test
    • Overview
    • Why It's Done
    • Risks
    • What You Can Expect
    • Results
    • Clinical Trials

    A stress test, also called an exercise stress test, shows how your heart works during physical activity. Because exercise makes your heart pump harder and faster, an exercise stress test can reveal problems with blood flow within your heart. A stress test usually involves walking on a treadmill or riding a stationary bike while your heart rhythm, blood pressure and breathing are monitored. Or you'll receive a drug that mimics the effects of exercise. Your doctor may recommend a stress test if you have signs or symptoms of coronary artery disease or an abnormal heart rhythm (arrhythmia). A stress test can help: 1. Guide treatment decisions 2. Determine how well heart treatment is working 3. Diagnose the severity of an existing heart condition

    Your doctor may recommend a stress test to: 1. Diagnose coronary artery disease.Your coronary arteries are the major blood vessels that supply your heart with blood, oxygen and nutrients. Coronary artery disease develops when these arteries become damaged or diseased — usually due to a buildup of deposits containing cholesterol and other substances (plaques). 2. Diagnose heart rhythm problems (arrhythmias).Heart arrhythmias occur when the electrical signals that coordinate your heartbeat don't work properly. An arrhythmia can cause your heart to beat too fast, too slowly or irregularly. 3. Guide treatment of heart disorders.If you've already been diagnosed with a heart condition, an exercise stress test can help your doctor determine if your current treatment is working. The test results also help your doctor decide on the best treatment for you. 4. Check your heart before surgery.Your doctor may use a stress test to determine when you can safely have surgery, such as valve replacem...

    A stress test is generally safe. Complications are rare. Possible complications of an exercise stress test are: 1. Low blood pressure.Your blood pressure may drop during or immediately after exercise, possibly causing you to feel dizzy or faint. The problem should go away after you stop exercising. 2. Abnormal heart rhythms (arrhythmias).Arrhythmias that occur during an exercise stress test usually go away soon after you stop exercising. 3. Heart attack (myocardial infarction).Although very rare, it's possible that an exercise stress test could cause a heart attack.

    A stress test usually takes about an hour, including both prep time and the time it takes to do the actual test. The actual exercise test takes only around 15 minutes. You'll usually walk on a treadmill or pedal a stationary bicycle. If you aren't able to exercise, you'll receive a drug through an IV that mimics the effect of exercise on your heart.

    If the information gathered during your exercise stress test shows your heart function to be normal, you may not need any further tests. However, if the results are normal and your symptoms continue to worsen, your doctor might recommend a nuclear stress test or another stress test that includes an echocardiogram before and after exercise or medications to increase blood flow to your heart. These tests are more accurate and provide more information about your heart function, but they are also more expensive. If your stress test results suggest that you might have coronary artery disease or show an arrhythmia, your doctor will use the information to develop a treatment plan. You may need additional tests, such as a coronary angiogram. If you had a stress test to help determine treatment for a heart condition, your doctor will use the results to plan or change your treatment.

    Explore Mayo Clinic studiesof tests and procedures to help prevent, detect, treat or manage conditions.

  9. Nuclear stress test - Mayo Clinic

    www.mayoclinic.org › tests-procedures › nuclear
    • Overview
    • Why It's Done
    • Risks
    • What You Can Expect
    • Results

    A nuclear stress test uses a small amount of radioactive material (tracer) and an imaging machine to create pictures showing the blood flow to your heart. The test measures blood flow while you are at rest and during activity, showing areas with poor blood flow or damage in your heart. A nuclear stress test is one of several types of stress tests. The radiotracer used during a nuclear stress test helps your doctor determine your risk of a heart attack or other cardiac event if you have coronary artery disease. A nuclear stress test may be done after a regular exercise stress test to get more information about your heart, or it may be the first stress test used. The test is done using a positron emission technology (PET) scanner or single photo emission computed tomography (SPECT) scanner. A nuclear stress test may also be called a myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) study, cardiac PET study or cardiac SPECTstudy.

    You may need a nuclear stress test if you have signs or symptoms of heart disease such as chest pain or shortness of breath. A nuclear stress test may also be used to guide your treatment if you've been diagnosed with a heart condition. Your doctor may recommend a nuclear stress test to: 1. Diagnose coronary artery disease. Your coronary arteries are the major blood vessels that supply your heart with blood, oxygen and nutrients. Coronary artery disease develops when these arteries become damaged or diseased — usually due to a buildup of deposits containing cholesterol and other substances (plaques). If you have symptoms such as chest pain or shortness of breath, a nuclear stress test can help determine if you have coronary artery disease and how severe the condition is. 2. Determine a treatment plan.If you have coronary artery disease, a nuclear stress test can tell your doctor how well treatment is working. The test also helps your doctor develop the right treatment for you by det...

    A nuclear stress test is generally safe. Complications are rare. As with any medical procedure, there is a risk of complications, which may include: 1. Abnormal heart rhythms (arrhythmias).Arrhythmias that occur during a stress test usually go away shortly after you stop exercising or the medication wears off. Life-threatening arrhythmias are rare. 2. Heart attack.Although extremely rare, it's possible that a nuclear stress test could cause a heart attack. 3. Low blood pressure.Blood pressure may drop during or immediately after exercise, possibly causing you to feel dizzy or faint. The problem should go away after you stop exercising. 4. Dizziness or chest pain.These symptoms can occur during a nuclear stress test. Some people also have nausea, shakiness, headache, flushing, shortness of breath and anxiety during the stress test. These signs and symptoms are usually mild and brief, but tell your doctor if they occur.

    A nuclear stress test involves injecting a radioactive tracer, then taking two sets of images of your heart — one while you're at rest and another after exercise. A nuclear stress test is done along with an exercise stress test, in which you walk on a treadmill. If you aren't able to exercise, you'll receive a drug through an IV that mimics exercise by increasing blood flow to your heart. A nuclear stress test can take two or more hours, depending on the radioactive tracer and imaging tests used.

    Your doctor will discuss your nuclear stress test results with you. Your results could show: 1. Normal blood flow during exercise and rest.You may not need further tests. 2. Normal blood flow during rest, but not during exercise.Part of your heart isn't receiving enough blood when you're exerting yourself. This might mean that you have one or more blocked arteries (coronary artery disease). 3. Low blood flow during rest and exercise.Part of your heart isn't getting enough blood at all times, which could be due to severe coronary artery disease or a previous heart attack. 4. Lack of blood flow in parts of your heart.Areas of your heart that don't show the radioactive tracer have damage from a heart attack. If you don't have enough blood flow through your heart, you may need to have coronary angiography. This test looks directly at the blood vessels supplying your heart. If you have severe blockages, you may need an angioplasty and stent placement or open-heart surgery (coronary arter...

  10. 1. To be able to chose the optimal type of stress tests for a patient with suspected ischemic heart disease 2. To understand diagnostic accuracy of different stress tests 3. To be able to explain basics of each stress test to a patient 4. To know contraindications to stress testing

    • Milena Gebska Md
    • 4/17/2017 1:10:52 PM
    • 2017
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