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  1. WHO | Typhoid

    www.who.int/immunization/diseases/typhoid

    Three typhoid vaccines are currently recommended by WHO for control of endemic and epidemic typhoid fever: an injectable typhoid conjugate vaccine (TCV), consisting of Vi polysaccharide antigen linked to tetanus toxoid protein... an injectable unconjugated polysaccharide vaccine based on the ...

  2. Can You Die of Typhoid Fever? How Deadly Is Typhoid Fever?

    www.medicinenet.com/can_you_die_of_typhoid_fever/...

    Sep 24, 2018 · Typhoid fever is treated with antibiotics that kill the Salmonella bacteria. Prior to the use of antibiotics, the fatality rate was 20%. Prior to the use of antibiotics, the fatality rate was 20%. Death occurred from overwhelming infection, pneumonia , intestinal bleeding, or intestinal perforation.

  3. Typhoid Fever - CDPH Home

    www.cdph.ca.gov/.../CID/DCDC/Pages/TyphoidFever.aspx

    What is typhoid fever? Typhoid fever is a serious infectious disease caused by the bacterium Salmonella Typhi (S. Typhi). A person with acute typhoid fever needs medical attention and antibiotic treatment.

  4. Typhoid Fever Vaccine, Symptoms, Treatment, Causes, Contagious

    www.emedicinehealth.com/typhoid_fever_enteric...

    Feb 18, 2020 · Typhoid fever is a potentially life-threatening infectious disease caused by a bacterium, Salmonella typhi. It mainly occurs in developing countries (especially Southern Asia), but it is seen in travelers from industrialized countries who visit where typhoid infections are common (endemic).

  5. Typhoid fever infects roughly 21.6 million people and kills an estimated 200, 000 people every year. Treated, it has few long-term sequelae and a 0.2% risk of mortality. Untreated typhoid fever is a life-threatening illness of several weeks’ duration with long-term morbidity often involving the central nervous system.

  6. Typhoid Fever in the United States | NICHD - Eunice Kennedy ...

    www.nichd.nih.gov/newsroom/releases/typhoid...

    Typhoid Fever in the United States. Wednesday, April 25, 2001. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), about 400 Americans each year acquire typhoid, most of them while traveling in developing countries. Untreated, the illness may last for 3 to 4 weeks.

  7. Typhoid & Paratyphoid Fever - Chapter 4 - 2020 Yellow Book ...

    wwwnc.cdc.gov/.../typhoid-paratyphoid-fever

    Typhoid & Paratyphoid Fever INFECTIOUS AGENT. Salmonella enterica serotypes Typhi and Paratyphi A, Paratyphi B, and Paratyphi C cause potentially... TRANSMISSION. Humans are the only source of these bacteria; no animal or environmental reservoirs have been identified. EPIDEMIOLOGY. An estimated 26 ...

  8. Typhoid carrier | definition of typhoid carrier by Medical ...

    medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/typhoid...

    typhoid carrier A person who has recovered from TYPHOID FEVER but who continues to culture Salmonella typhi organisms in the gall bladder and to excrete them in the stools. If such a person handles food, the disease is liable to be transmitted to others.

  9. Typhoid Mary | historical figure | Britannica

    www.britannica.com/biography/Typhoid-Mary

    Typhoid Mary was a famous carrier of the typhoid bacterium. She allegedly was the source of multiple outbreaks of typhoid fever in New York City and Long Island between 1900 and 1907. She allegedly was the source of multiple outbreaks of typhoid fever in New York City and Long Island between 1900 and 1907.

  10. Mary Mallon - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Typhoid_Mary

    Mary Mallon (September 23, 1869 – November 11, 1938), also known as Typhoid Mary, was an Irish-born cook believed to have infected 53 people, three of whom died, with typhoid fever, and the first person in the United States identified as an asymptomatic carrier of the disease.