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  1. Mary Mallon (September 23, 1869 – November 11, 1938), also known as Typhoid Mary, was an Irish-born cook believed to have infected 53 people, three of whom died, with typhoid fever, and the first person in the United States identified as an asymptomatic carrier of the disease. 1.1 Early life 1.2 Career 1.3 Investigation

    Mary Mallon - Wikipedia

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Typhoid_Mary
  2. Mary Mallon - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Typhoid_Mary

    Mary Mallon (September 23, 1869 – November 11, 1938), also known as Typhoid Mary, was an Irish-born cook believed to have infected 53 people, three of whom died, with typhoid fever, and the first person in the United States identified as an asymptomatic carrier of the disease. 1.1 Early life 1.2 Career 1.3 Investigation

  3. Typhoid Mary | historical figure | Britannica

    www.britannica.com/biography/Typhoid-Mary

    Typhoid Mary, byname of Mary Mallon, (born September 23, 1869, Cookstown, County Tyrone, Ireland—died November 11, 1938, North Brother Island, Bronx, New York, U.S.), famous typhoid carrier who allegedly gave rise to multiple outbreaks of typhoid fever.

  4. 'Typhoid Mary': The true story of Irish cook who infected her ...

    www.washingtonpost.com/history/2020/03/17/...

    Mar 17, 2020 · “ ’TYPHOID MARY’ HAS REAPPEARED: Human Culture Tube, Herself Immune, Spreads the Disease Wherever She Goes,” a New York Times headline announced. She was taken into custody and returned to her...

    • Mary Mallon Spreads Typhoid Across New York City - Drunk History
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    • What Really Happened with Typhoid Mary?
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  5. Typhoid Mary, Who Spread Typhoid in Early 1900s

    www.thoughtco.com/typhoid-mary-1779179

    Mary Mallon (September 23, 1869–November 11, 1938), known as "Typhoid Mary," was the cause of several typhoid outbreaks. Since Mary was the first "healthy carrier" of typhoid fever recognized in the United States, she did not understand how someone not sick could spread disease—so she tried to fight back.

    • Jennifer Rosenberg
  6. Typhoid Mary: the super-spreader before the term even existed ...

    www.theguardian.com/science/2020/mar/10/typhoid...

    Mar 10, 2020 · Mary Mallon, known as Typhoid Mary, in a photo circa the 1900s after she was institutionalized on North Brother Island, where she stayed from 1914 until her death in 1938.

  7. Typhoid Mary was a maligned immigrant who got a bum rap

    medicalxpress.com/news/2020-04-typhoid-mary...

    Apr 24, 2020 · Mary Mallon, known as Typhoid Mary, was until now the most prominent example in the U.S. of the unknowing disease carrier. She spread typhoid fever to at least 53 people, causing three deaths ...

  8. Did Typhoid Mary Cause the Deaths of Thousands of People?

    www.snopes.com/fact-check/typhoid-mary

    Sep 26, 2002 · The woman we now know as Typhoid Mary came to the attention of the authorities in 1906 when members of a household on Long Island sickened of typhoid. Their cook, Mary Mallon, had disappeared, and...

  9. History of Typhoid Mary | Mental Floss

    www.mentalfloss.com/article/620785/typhoid-mary...

    Mar 20, 2020 · Mary Mallon’s asymptomatic spreading of typhoid fever is a cautionary tale about the importance of washing your hands.

  10. 10 Things You May Not Know About 'Typhoid Mary' - HISTORY

    www.history.com/news/10-things-you-may-not-know...
    • Typhoid Mary's real name was Mary Mallon. She was born on September 23, 1869, in Cookstown, a small village in the north of Ireland. Mallon’s hometown in County Tyrone was among one of Ireland’s poorest areas.
    • Only three confirmed deaths were linked to Typhoid Mary. Mallon was presumed to have infected 51 people, and three of those illnesses resulted in death.
    • She emigrated from Ireland as a teenager. Mallon traveled by herself to start a new life in the United States in 1883. The teenager moved in with her aunt and uncle in New York City, and even as an adult Mallon never lost her lilting brogue.
    • Typhoid Mary was the picture of health. Although she harbored the extremely contagious bacteria that cause typhoid fever, Mallon never demonstrated any of its symptoms—which include fever, headaches and diarrhea.
  11. What the City of New York Did to "Typhoid Mary" Was Pretty ...

    io9.gizmodo.com/what-the-city-of-new-york-did-to...

    Typhoid Mary Although people called Mallon "Typhoid Mary" during her first stay on the island, she became infamous five years after she was released. In 1915, Sloane Maternity Hospital experienced...