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  1. Jun 18, 2011 · Retired engineer Jack Clemens has been getting attention lately with his giant radio-controlled model of the airship U.S.S. Macon.. The 1/40 scale model is 20-feet long and has a diameter of 3.3 feet; it is driven by miniature “œFirefly” electric motors attached to the eight outrigger props and powered by a lithium-polymer battery in the nose, and is lifted by helium contained in multiple ...

    • This is Not Hindenburg

      The gadget blog Gizmodo recently published a wonderful...

    • Dramatic

      Dramatic and disturbing photos of the Goodyear blimp crash...

    • U.S.S. Macon

      The United States Navy airships U.S.S. Akron (ZRS-4) and...

  2. The AMT 1/520 USS Akron/USS Macon model is a reissued 1970s kit. The boxtop art is a reproduction of the original; the new box-bottom graphic is a photo of the completed model with modern font text. Note, the vintage art, showing Akron and Macon flying in formation, never happened - Akron was destroyed 17 days before Macon’s first flight.

    • AMT
    • Flying Aircraft Carriers
    • Development of Akron and Macon
    • Structural Design of Akron and Macon
    • Operational History of U.S.S. Akron
    • Crash of U.S.S. Akron
    • Operational History of U.S.S. Macon
    • Crash of U.S.S. Macon
    • Akron and Macon Statistics and Specifications

    Akron and Macon were designed as airborne aircraft carriers, which could launch and recover heavier-than-air planes for use in both reconnaissance and self-defense. The ships were equipped with hangars, approximately 75′ long x 60′ wide x 16′ high, which could stow and service up to five aircraft in flight. Aircraft were launched and retrieved by m...

    The Akron and Macon grew out of the Five Year Plan proposed by the U. S. Navy’s Bureau of Aeronautics, which had been approved by the United States Congress in 1926, and which authorized the construction of two large rigid airships. The Navy contest to design and build the two new ships was won by the Goodyear-Zeppelin Corporation, a joint venture ...

    As part of the Goodyear-Zeppelin arrangement, the Luftshiffbau Zeppelin had sent technical experts to Akron to train Goodyear employees in the design and construction of airships. Goodyear president Paul Litchfield had insisted that the Zeppelin Company’s chief stress engineer, Karl Arnstein, be included in that group, and in November, 1924 Arnstei...

    Construction of U.S.S. Akron began in November, 1929 at the newly completed Goodyear-Zeppelin Airdock in Akron, Ohio. The design of U.S.S. Akron, and its sister ship U.S.S. Macon, were based on plans prepared by Goodyear-Zeppelin engineer Karl Arnstein which differed radically from the design of previous rigid airships. The ship was christened by F...

    U.S.S. Akron departed NAS Lakehurst on the evening of April 3, 1933 on a mission to calibrate radio direction finding equipment along the northeastern coast of the United States. The ship was under the command of Frank C. McCord, and among the 76 persons on board were VIPs including Rear Admiral William Moffett, Chief of the Navy’s Bureau of Aerona...

    U.S.S. Macon (ZRS-5) was a virtually identical copy of her sister ship, U.S.S. Akron, with some minor modifications and improvements. The airship was christened by wife of Admiral William Moffett on March 11, 1933, and made its first flight on April 21, 1933. Later that year Macon left the Naval Air Station at Lakehurst for her new home in Californ...

    Macon crashed at sea off the coast of California during a storm on February 12, 1935, after her unrepaired upper fin suffered in-flight structural failure. The failure of the upper fin damaged the three aft gas cells and caused the loss of a significant quantity of helium, representing about 20% of the airship’s lift. But the Macon remained in the ...

    ZRS-4 U.S.S. Akron: 1. Length: 785 feet 2. Gas capacity: 6,850,000 cubic feet 3. Useful lift: 152,644 lbs 4. Maximum speed: 69 knots 5. Crew: 60 officers and men 6. First flight: September 25, 1931 7. Final flight: April 3-4, 1933 8. Total flight hours: 1,700 9. Total flights: 74

  3. AMT model kit in scale 1:520, 892 is a rebox released in 2015 | Contents, Previews, Reviews, History + Marketplace | Airship Akron-class | EAN: 0849398006528.

  4. Flying aircraft carriers of the U.S. Navy! USS Akron/USS Macon Number: T572 Scale: 1:520 Type: Full kit Released: 1973 New tool Packaging: Rigid box (Top opener) Topic: Airship Akron-class » Airships (Aircraft) Markings Airship Akron-class USS Akron (ZRS-4) US Navy (1794-now) Aluminum Dope & Natural Meta. USS Macon (ZRS-5) US Navy (1794-now ...

  5. Overview. USS Macon (ZRS-5) was a rigid frame airship built and operated by the United States Navy and designated for scouting purposes. In service for less than two years, in 1935 Macon was damaged in a storm and lost off the coast of California.

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  7. USS Akron/Macon US Navy Airships. Unassembled plastic model kit. Don't forget building supplies! and is no longer available. List price: $32.50. This model kit requires assembly. Cement, paint and other construction materials not included unless specifically stated in the description. The U.S.S. Akron and U.S.S. Macon were never as widely known ...

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