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      • Wallace came to much the same conclusion that Darwin published in the Origin of Species: biogeography was simply a record of inheritance. As species colonized new habitats and their old ranges were divided by mountain ranges or other barriers, they took on the distributions they have today.
      evolution.berkeley.edu › the-history-of-evolutionary-thought › 1800s
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  2. Wallace pushed the study of biogeography to grander scales than Darwin. As he traveled through Indonesia, for example, he was struck by the sharp distinction between the northwestern part of the archipelago and the southeastern, despite their similar climate and terrain.

  3. Alfred Russel Wallace was one of the 19th Century’s greatest field biologists, yet his scientific legacy is much farther reaching than it would first appear to the casual observer.

  4. But in the mid-1800s, Darwin and the British biologist Alfred Russel Wallace independently conceived of a natural, even observable, way for life to change: a process Darwin called natural selection.

  5. Nov 10, 2012 · Wallace had far more opportunity to see the power of islands in person than did Darwin. Where Darwin spent only five weeks in the Galápagos and a mere ten days in the Indo-Australian Archipelago, stopping only at Tahiti, Wallace lived in the archipelago for eight years, exploring and collecting on many islands.

    • Joshua Rosenau
    • rosenau@ncse.com
    • 2012
  6. Wallace's classification of zoogeographical regions became a cornerstone of modern biogeography and a reference for a wide variety of biological disciplines, including global biodiversity and conservation sciences.

    • Ben G. Holt, Jean-Philippe Lessard, Michael K. Borregaard, Susanne A. Fritz, Miguel B. Araújo, Migue...
    • 2013
  7. Sep 13, 2013 · Alfred Russel Wallace, whose contributions to science we celebrate this year, the 100th anniversary of his death, is probably best known for his role in articulating evolution by natural selection with Charles Darwin in the mid-19th century.

  8. Biogeography: Wallace and Wegener at http://evolution.berkeley.edu/evolibrary/article/history_16. What is biogeography? What scientist helped found the modern science of biogeography? Where did Wallace collect much of his data? What did Wallace study? What was the proposal of Alfred Wegener? What was Gondwanaland?

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