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  1. Hundred of South Erpingham: Hevingham | British History Online

    www.british-history.ac.uk › topographical-hist
    • Manors of Ripton-Hall, Alias Catts, Cum Criketots.
    • Keritoft, Alias Crytoft Manor
    • Rectors

    Rippetun was a separate berewic, and paid as much to the geldor tax as Hevingham did, viz. 5d. ob. so that it contained half thetown; it belonged to William Bishop of Thetford, and attendedthat see, till the Bishop infeoffed Walter Gifford in it, (fn. 4) who held it ofthe see at the Conqueror's survey, and it was always held of the seeof Norwich, as part of its barony; it seems at the Confessor's survey,that Herold held it of the bishoprick, that it was then worth 30s.and at the conquest 50s. per annum. In King John's time Rogerle Chat, or Cat, had it, from whom it still bears the name of Cat'smanor; William le Cat owned it in 1275, Henry le Cat in 1285 waslord here, and had joined one half of Criketot's manor to this,which he held at the 8th part of a fee of the Earl of Gloucester;after him John Catt had it, and he was succeeded by Henry le Cat,who in 1314 held it of Clare honour, and Norwich see. In 1316,this Henry had a charter for free warren for the manor, and died thisyear lea...

    Was held by Peter Jordan of Leringsete, of the Earl of Clare, atthe 8th part of a fee in King John's time, and one moiety was afterwards, by Tho. Jordan, his son, granted (fn. 6) to Richard de Lounde, (fn. 7) fromwhom Simon de Criketot, whose name the manor still retains, (thoughcorrupted in its spelling and pronunciation,) had it. Ralf de Criketothad a daughter named Emma, on whom Simon aforesaid settled thismanor in 1239. It divided after into several parts, for in 1314Bartholemew Hauteyn, William de Merkeshall, and Reginald deRefham, had each their parts, which the next year were held by Johnand William le Marshall, Alice Hauteyn, and Reginald de Refham;in 1344 Richard de Leyham and Alice his wife settled it by fine onWilliam Butts, senior, and John de Buxton; in 1379 William deMorley, Knt. held it. In 1401 Robert Calthorp was lord, andafterwards it was joined, and hath ever since passed with Ripton-hall,and still remains with it. The Church is dedicated to St. Botolph, and the c...

    COLLATED BY THE BISHOPS OF NORWICH TILL THE EXCHANGE. 1307, Richard de Sutton, priest. 1319, Mr. John de Glyntone; he resigned in 1338, to Anthony de Goldesburgh, in exchange for Brook deanery,and he resigned, in 1346, to John de Otrington, in exchange for Sudbury deanery.In 1354, Walter de Donewico resigned this rectory, toSilvester at Yates, in exchange for Brinton. In 1374, William Halliday, chaplain to the Bishop here, was buried inColteshallchurch. In 1419, William Sponne, archdeacon of Norfolk, was rector, for whomsee vol. iii. p. 644; and in 1430, John Bulman, of whom see in vol. i. p. 195. In 1471, Henry Candeler, rector, was buried in the chancel for whomthis remains on a broken brass plate, loose in the chest, Orate pro anim Hencici Candeler, quondam Rectoris istiusEcclesie, qui obiit riro die Wensis Mail, Ino Domini Mo cccclrrocuius anime pcopicietur Deus Amen Ralf Pulvertoft, master of the Charnel at Norwich, was rector, forwhom see vol. iv. p. 11, as was Miles Spencer,...

  2. Mary Tudor (I of England) (The Diary of Samuel Pepys)

    www.pepysdiary.com › encyclopedia › 10596
    • Birth and Family
    • Childhood
    • Adolescence
    • Adulthood
    • Accession
    • Reign
    • Death
    • Legacy
    • Titles, Style, and Arms
    • Genealogy

    Mary was born on 18 February 1516 at the Palace of Placentia in Greenwich, England. She was the only child of King Henry VIII and his first wife Catherine of Aragon to survive infancy. Her mother had suffered many miscarriages. Before Mary's birth, four previous pregnancies had resulted in a stillborn daughter and three short-lived or stillborn sons, including Henry, Duke of Cornwall. Mary was baptised into the Catholic faith at the Church of the Observant Friars in Greenwich three days after her birth. Her godparents included Lord Chancellor Thomas Wolsey, her great-aunt Catherine of York, Countess of Devon, and Agnes Howard, Duchess of Norfolk. Henry VIII's cousin, once removed, Margaret Pole, Countess of Salisbury, stood sponsor for Mary's confirmation, which was conducted immediately after the baptism. The following year, Mary became a godmother herself when she was named as one of the sponsors of her cousin Frances Brandon. In 1520, the Countess of Salisbury was appointed Mary'...

    Mary was a precocious child. In July 1520, when scarcely four and a half years old, she entertained a visiting French delegation with a performance on the virginals (a type of harpsichord). A great part of her early education came from her mother, who consulted the Spanish humanist Juan Luis Vives for advice and commissioned him to write De Institutione Feminae Christianae, a treatise on the education of girls. By the age of nine, Mary could read and write Latin. She studied French, Spanish, music, dance, and perhaps Greek. Henry VIII doted on his daughter and boasted to the Venetian ambassador Sebastian Giustiniani that Mary never cried.Mary had a fair complexion with pale blue eyes and red or reddish-golden hair. She was ruddy-cheeked, a trait she inherited from her father. Despite his affection for Mary, Henry was deeply disappointed that his marriage had produced no sons. By the time Mary was nine years old, it was apparent that Henry and Catherine would have no more children, l...

    Meanwhile, the marriage of Mary's parents was in jeopardy. Disappointed at the lack of a male heir, and eager to remarry, Henry attempted to have his marriage to Catherine annulled, but Pope Clement VII refused his request. Henry claimed, citing biblical passages (Leviticus 20:21), that his marriage to Catherine was unclean because she was the widow of his brother Arthur (Mary's uncle). Catherine claimed that her marriage to Arthur was never consummated and so was not a valid marriage. Her first marriage had been annulled by a previous pope, Julius II, on that basis. Clement may have been reluctant to act because he was influenced by Charles V, Catherine's nephew and Mary's former betrothed, whose troops had surrounded and occupied Rome in the War of the League of Cognac. From 1531, Mary was often sick with irregular menstruation and depression, although it is not clear whether this was caused by stress, puberty or a more deep-seated disease. She was not permitted to see her mother,...

    In 1536, Queen Anne fell from the king's favour and was beheaded. Elizabeth, like Mary, was declared illegitimate and stripped of her succession rights. Within two weeks of Anne's execution, Henry married Jane Seymour, who urged her husband to make peace with Mary. Henry insisted that Mary recognise him as head of the Church of England, repudiate papal authority, acknowledge that the marriage between her parents was unlawful, and accept her own illegitimacy. She attempted to reconcile with him by submitting to his authority as far as "God and my conscience" permitted, but was eventually bullied into signing a document agreeing to all of Henry's demands. Reconciled with her father, Mary resumed her place at court. Henry granted her a household, which included the reinstatement of Mary's favourite, Susan Clarencieux. Mary's privy purse expenses for this period show that Hatfield House, the Palace of Beaulieu (also called Newhall), Richmond and Hunsdon were among her principal places o...

    On 6 July 1553, at the age of 15, Edward VI died of a lung infection, possibly tuberculosis. He did not want the crown to go to Mary because he feared she would restore Catholicism and undo his and their father's reforms, and so he planned to exclude her from the line of succession. His advisers told him that he could not disinherit only one of his half-sisters: he would have to disinherit Elizabeth as well, even though she was a Protestant. Guided by John Dudley, 1st Duke of Northumberland, and perhaps others, Edward excluded both from the line of succession in his will. Contradicting the Succession Act, which restored Mary and Elizabeth to the line of succession, Edward named Dudley's daughter-in-law Lady Jane Grey, the granddaughter of Henry VIII's younger sister Mary, as his successor. Lady Jane's mother was Frances Brandon, Mary's cousin and goddaughter. Just before Edward VI's death, Mary was summoned to London to visit her dying brother, but was warned that the summons was a...

    One of Mary's first actions as queen was to order the release of the Roman Catholic Duke of Norfolk and Stephen Gardiner from imprisonment in the Tower of London, as well as her kinsman Edward Courtenay. Mary understood that the young Lady Jane was essentially a pawn in Dudley's scheme, and Dudley was the only conspirator of rank executed for high treason in the immediate aftermath of the coup. Lady Jane and her husband, Lord Guildford Dudley, though found guilty, were kept under guard in the Tower rather than immediately executed, while Lady Jane's father, Henry Grey, 1st Duke of Suffolk, was released. Mary was left in a difficult position, as almost all the Privy Counsellors had been implicated in the plot to put Lady Jane on the throne. She appointed Gardiner to the council and made him both Bishop of Winchester and Lord Chancellor, offices he held until his death in November 1555. Susan Clarencieux became Mistress of the Robes. On 1 October 1553, Gardiner crowned Mary at Westmin...

    After Philip's visit in 1557, Mary again thought she was pregnant, with a baby due in March 1558. She decreed in her will that her husband would be the regent during the minority of their child.But no child was born, and Mary was forced to accept that her half-sister Elizabeth would be her lawful successor. Mary was weak and ill from May 1558. In pain, possibly from ovarian cysts or uterine cancer, she died on 17 November 1558, aged 42, at St James's Palace, during an influenza epidemic that also claimed Pole's life later that day. She was succeeded by Elizabeth. Philip, who was in Brussels, wrote to his sister Joan: "I felt a reasonable regret for her death." Although Mary's will stated that she wished to be buried next to her mother, she was interred in Westminster Abbey on 14 December, in a tomb she eventually shared with Elizabeth. The inscription on their tomb, affixed there by James I when he succeeded Elizabeth, is Regno consortes et urna, hic obdormimus Elizabetha et Maria s...

    At her funeral service, John White, bishop of Winchester, praised Mary: "She was a king's daughter; she was a king's sister; she was a king's wife. She was a queen, and by the same title a king also."She was the first woman to successfully claim the throne of England, despite competing claims and determined opposition, and enjoyed popular support and sympathy during the earliest parts of her reign, especially from the Roman Catholics of England. Protestant writers at the time, and since, have often condemned Mary's reign. By the 17th century, the memory of her religious persecutions had led to the adoption of her sobriquet "Bloody Mary". John Knox attacked her in his First Blast of the Trumpet against the Monstrous Regiment of Women (1558), and she was prominently vilified in Actes and Monuments (1563), by John Foxe. Foxe's book remained popular throughout the following centuries and helped shape enduring perceptions of Mary as a bloodthirsty tyrant. Mary is remembered in the 21st c...

    When Mary ascended the throne, she was proclaimed under the same official style as Henry VIII and Edward VI: "Mary, by the Grace of God, Queen of England, France and Ireland, Defender of the Faith, and of the Church of England and of Irelandon Earth Supreme Head". The title Supreme Head of the Church was repugnant to Mary's Catholicism, and she omitted it after Christmas 1553. Under Mary's marriage treaty with Philip, the official joint style reflected not only Mary's but also Philip's dominions and claims: "Philip and Mary, by the grace of God, King and Queen of England, France, Naples, Jerusalem, and Ireland, Defenders of the Faith, Princes of Spain and Sicily, Archdukes of Austria, Dukes of Milan, Burgundy and Brabant, Counts of Habsburg, Flanders and Tyrol".This style, which had been in use since 1554, was replaced when Philip inherited the Spanish Crown in 1556 with "Philip and Mary, by the Grace of God King and Queen of England, Spain, France, both the Sicilies, Jerusalem and...

    Both Mary and Philip were descended from John of Gaunt, the Duke of Lancaster, a relationship that was used to portray Philip as an English king.

    • 1 October 1553
    • Jane (disputed) or Edward VI
    • July 1553 –, 17 November 1558
    • Elizabeth I
  3. Jul 21, 2021 · Free trade, parliamentary reform, church affairs, foreign policy, land, tithes, bimetallism, the housing of the poor all engaged his attention and his pen. Grey's marriage to Maria Copley, daughter of Sir Joseph Copley of Sprotborough, was a devoted partnership until her death in 1879. When apart they wrote to each other daily, often more than ...

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  5. The Dancing Water, the Singing Apple, and the Speaking Bird

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › The_Dancing_Water,_the

    18 hours ago · The Dancing Water, the Singing Apple, and the Speaking Bird is a Sicilian fairy tale collected by Giuseppe Pitrè, and translated by Thomas Frederick Crane for his Italian Popular Tales. Joseph Jacobs included a reconstruction of the story in his European Folk and Fairy Tales. The original title is " Li Figghi di lu Cavuliciddaru ", for which ...

    • ATU 707 (The Dancing Water, the Singing Apple, and the Speaking Bird; The Bird of Truth, or The Three Golden Children, or The Three Golden Sons)
    • Sicily, Eurasia, Worldwide
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