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  1. Welf II (1072 – 24 September 1120, Kaufering), or Welfhard, called Welf the Fat (pinguis), was Duke of Bavaria from 1101 until his death. In the Welf genealogy, he is counted as Welf V.

    Welf II, Duke of Bavaria - Wikipedia

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Welf_II,_Duke_of_Bavaria
  2. Welf I, Duke of Bavaria - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Welf_I,_Duke_of_Bavaria

    Welf was the son of Albert Azzo II, Margrave of Milan, and Kunigunde of Altdorf. When Welf's maternal uncle, Welf, Duke of Carinthia (also known as Welf III), died childless in 1055, Welf inherited his property. In 1062 Welf married Ethelinde of Northeim, daughter of Otto, Duke of Bavaria.

  3. Welf II, Duke of Bavaria - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Welf_II,_Duke_of_Bavaria

    Welf II (1072 – 24 September 1120, Kaufering), or Welfhard, called Welf the Fat (pinguis), was Duke of Bavaria from 1101 until his death. In the Welf genealogy, he is counted as Welf V.

  4. Welf I of Bavaria - Find A Grave Memorial

    www.findagrave.com/memorial/147101884

    Birth: Death: Count of Altdorf, Count in Swabia, Duke of Bavaria, Count in Alemannia, Duke of Auxerre Welf I or Welfo (died before 876) was a Swabian nobleman. He was a member of the Elder House of Welf. Welf originated from a distinguished dynasty of Franconian nobles. He is mentioned only once: on the occasion of...

    • unknown, Bavaria (Bayern), Germany
    • Weingarten Abbey, Landkreis Ravensburg, Baden-Württemberg, Germany
    • unknown, Bavaria (Bayern), Germany
    • 147101884 · View Source
  5. Welf (776 - c.825) - Genealogy

    www.geni.com/people/Welf-I-count-in-Swabia/...

    The relationship between Welf I and all later members of the Swabian group (Welf, Duke of Carinthia, and his relatives, who were counts of Altdorf) is, again, known only through legend. The Elder House of Welf became extinct when Welf, Duke of Carinthia, died childless in 1055.

  6. Welf V von Bayern (1072 - 1120) - Genealogy

    www.geni.com/people/Welf-V-duke-of-Bavaria/...

    He returned to Bavaria after separating from his wife in 1095[326]. He succeeded his father in 1101 in his Bavarian and Swabian estates, and was appointed as WELF II Duke of Bavaria by Emperor Heinrich IV. He was a strong supporter of Emperor Heinrich V, accompanying him on many expeditions to Italy[327].

    • Welf I, Duke of Bavaria, Judith of Flanders, Countess of Northumbria
  7. Welf I (died 6 November 1101, Paphos, Cyprus) was Duke of Bavaria from 1070 to 1077 and from 1096 to his death. He was the first member of the Welf branch of the House of Este. In the genealogy of the Elder House of Welf he is counted as Welf IV.

  8. Welf II of Bavaria (1072-1120) - Find A Grave Memorial

    www.findagrave.com/.../129993981/welf_ii-of_bavaria

    Welf was the oldest son of Welf I, Duke of Bavaria, and his wife Judith of Flanders. He became duke of Bavaria after the death of his father in 1101. In the Welf genealogy, he is counted as Welf V. In 1089, he married Matilda of Tuscany, she was 26 years older, in order to strengthen the relation between his family and...

  9. Welf Dynasty | German history | Britannica

    www.britannica.com/topic/Welf-Dynasty

    Welf IV became duke of Bavaria as Welf I, in 1070. He abandoned his alliance with the Holy Roman emperor Henry IV to become an important supporter of the papal party in Italy. His 17-year-old son, Welf V (later Welf II of Bavaria), married the 43-year-old countess Matilda of Tuscany in 1089; the marriage ended in separation.

  10. Welf I, Duke of Bavaria

    enacademic.com/dic.nsf/enwiki/1117088

    Welf I (died 6 November 1101, Paphos) was duke of Bavaria from 1070 to 1077 and from 1096 to his death. He was the first member of the Welf branch of the House of Este. In the Welf genealogy he is counted as Welf IV.Welf was the son of Azzo II of

  11. BAVARIA DUKES - FMG

    fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BAVARIA.htm

    Ekkehard records the death of Welf Duke of Bavaria and his burial in Cyprus [306]. The necrology of Weingarten records the death "V Id Nov" of "Welf dux senior hic sepultus" [307], which suggests that his body was moved after its first burial in Cyprus. [m firstly---.