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  1. Welf I, Duke of Bavaria - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Welf_I,_Duke_of_Bavaria

    Welf was the son of Albert Azzo II, Margrave of Milan, and Kunigunde of Altdorf. When Welf's maternal uncle, Welf, Duke of Carinthia (also known as Welf III), died childless in 1055, Welf inherited his property. In 1062 Welf married Ethelinde of Northeim, daughter of Otto, Duke of Bavaria.

  2. Welf I of Bavaria - Find A Grave Memorial

    www.findagrave.com/memorial/147101884

    Birth: Death: Count of Altdorf, Count in Swabia, Duke of Bavaria, Count in Alemannia, Duke of Auxerre Welf I or Welfo (died before 876) was a Swabian nobleman. He was a member of the Elder House of Welf. Welf originated from a distinguished dynasty of Franconian nobles. He is mentioned only once: on the occasion of...

    • unknown, Bavaria (Bayern), Germany
    • Weingarten Abbey, Landkreis Ravensburg, Baden-Württemberg, Germany
    • unknown, Bavaria (Bayern), Germany
    • 147101884 · View Source
  3. Welf II, Duke of Bavaria - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Welf_II,_Duke_of_Bavaria

    Welf was the oldest son of Welf I, Duke of Bavaria, and his wife Judith of Flanders. In 1088 [4] or 1089, [5] when Welf was still a teenager, he married Matilda of Tuscany , [3] who was more than twenty years older than him, in order to strengthen the relation between his family and the pope during the Investiture Controversy between king and ...

  4. Welf (1032 - 1101) - Genealogy

    www.geni.com/people/Welf-IV-duke-of-Bavaria/...

    Welf I, Duke of Bavaria. Welf I (died 6 November 1101, Paphos) was duke of Bavaria from 1070 to 1077 and from 1096 to his death. He was the first member of the Welf branch of the House of Este. In the Welf genealogy he is counted as Welf IV. Welf was the son of Azzo II of Este and his wife Chuniza of Altdorf.

    • Welf II, Duke of Bavaria, Henry IX, Duke of Bavaria, Kunizza of Bavaria
    • Albert Azzo II, Margrave of Milan
  5. Welf I | duke of Bavaria | Britannica

    www.britannica.com/biography/Welf-I

    Other articles where Welf I is discussed: Henry IV: Early years: … IV, the new duke (as Welf I) of Bavaria, and with Rudolf, the duke of Swabia, Henry was forced to grant immunity to the rebels in 1073 and had to agree to the razing of the royal Harz Castle in the final peace treaty in February 1074.

  6. Welf I (died 6 November 1101, Paphos, Cyprus) was Duke of Bavaria from 1070 to 1077 and from 1096 to his death. He was the first member of the Welf branch of the House of Este. In the genealogy of the Elder House of Welf he is counted as Welf IV.

  7. Welf (776 - c.825) - Genealogy

    www.geni.com/people/Welf-I-count-in-Swabia/...

    The relationship between Welf I and all later members of the Swabian group (Welf, Duke of Carinthia, and his relatives, who were counts of Altdorf) is, again, known only through legend. The Elder House of Welf became extinct when Welf, Duke of Carinthia, died childless in 1055.

  8. Welf Dynasty | German history | Britannica

    www.britannica.com/topic/Welf-Dynasty

    Welf IV became duke of Bavaria as Welf I, in 1070. He abandoned his alliance with the Holy Roman emperor Henry IV to become an important supporter of the papal party in Italy. His 17-year-old son, Welf V (later Welf II of Bavaria), married the 43-year-old countess Matilda of Tuscany in 1089; the marriage ended in separation.

  9. House of Welf | Familypedia | Fandom

    familypedia.wikia.org/wiki/House_of_Welf
    • Origins
    • Bavaria and Saxony
    • Brunswick and Hanover
    • Early Welf Princes
    • See Also
    • External Links

    The House of Welf is the older branch of the House of Este, a dynasty whose earliest known members lived in Lombardy in the 9th century, sometimes called Welf-Este. The first member was Welf IV; he inherited the property of the Elder House of Welf when his maternal uncle Welf III, Duke of Carinthia and Verona, the last male Welf of the Elder House, died in 1055. Welf IV was the son of Welf III's sister Kunigunde of Altdorf and her husband Albert Azzo II of Este, Margrave of Milan. In 1070, Welf IV became duke of Bavaria. Welf V married Countess Matilda of Tuscany, who died childless and left him her possessions, including Tuscany, Ferrara, Modena, Mantua, and Reggio, which played a role in the Investiture controversy. Since the Welf dynasty sided with the Pope in this controversy, partisans of the Pope came to be known in Italy as Guelphs; see Guelphs and Ghibellines.

    Henry the Black, duke of Bavaria from 1120–1126, was the first of the three dukes of the Welf dynasty called Henry. His wife Wulfhild was the heiress of the house of Billung, possessing the territory around Lüneburg in Lower Saxony. Their son, Henry the Proud was the son-in-law and heir of Emperor Lothair of Supplinburg and became also duke of Saxony on Lothair's death. Lothair left his territory around Brunswick, inherited from his mother of the Brunonen family, to his daughter Gertrud. Her husband Henry the Proud became then the favoured candidate in the imperial election against Conrad III of the Hohenstaufen. But Henry lost the election, as the other princes feared his power and temperament, and was dispossessed of his duchies by Conrad III. Henry's brother Welf VI (1115-1191), Markgrave of Tuscany, later left his Swabian territories around Ravensburg, the original possessions of the Elder House of Welf, to his nephew Emperor Frederick Iand thus to the House of Hohenstaufen. Hen...

    Henry's son Otto of Brunswick was elected King of the Romans and crowned Holy Roman Emperor Otto IV after years of further conflicts with the Hohenstaufen emperors. He incurred the wrath of Pope Innocent III and was excommunicated in 1215. Otto was forced to abdicate the imperial throne by the Hohenstaufen Frederick II.He was the only Welf to become emperor of the Holy Roman Empire. Henry the Lion's grandson Otto the Child became duke of a part of Saxony in 1235, the new Duchy of Brunswick-Lüneburg, and died there in 1252. The duchy was divided several times during the High Middle Ages amongst various lines of the House of Welf, but the rulers all continued to be styled as the "Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg" in addition to "Prince of Lüneburg", "Prince of Wolfenbüttel", "Prince of Calenberg-Gottingen" or "Prince of Grubenhagen" etc. The subsequent history of the dukedom and its subordinate principalities was characterized by numerous divisions and reunifications. The subordinate states...

    Dukes of Bavaria and Saxony

    1. Welf I, Duke of Bavaria (1070-1077, 1096-1101) 2. Welf II, son of Welf I; Duke of Bavaria (1101–1120) 3. Henry IX, the Black, son of Welf I; Duke of Bavaria (1120–1126) 4. Henry X, the Proud, son of Henry the Black; Duke of Bavaria (1126–1138), Duke of Saxony (1137–1139) 5. Henry XI, the Lion, son of Henry the Proud; Duke of Saxony (1142–1180), Duke of Bavaria (1156–1180)

    Count Palatine of the Rhine

    1. Henry V, son of Henry the Lion; Count Palatine of the Rhine (1195–1213) 2. Henry VI, son of Henry V; Count Palatine of the Rhine (1213-1214)

    Holy Roman Emperor

    1. Otto IV, son of Henry the Lion; Holy Roman Emperor (1198-1215)

  10. Welf | The Arthurverse Wiki | Fandom

    arthurverse.fandom.com/wiki/Welf

    Since the Welf dynasty sided with the Pope in this controversy, partisans of the Pope came to be known in Italy as Guelphs (Guelfi). Bavaria and Saxony Edit. Henry IX, Duke of Bavaria, from 1120–1126, was the first of the three dukes of the Welf dynasty called Henry.

    • Otto IV, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg
    • Welf I, Duke of Bavaria
    • 11th century
    • German