Yahoo Web Search

  1. About 26,600,000 search results
  1. Sep 26, 2017 · Hormonal changes can lead to mood fluctuations, feelings of low self-esteem, anxiety and depression. For many teens, dealing with bodily changes and mood swings can be a tremendous source of stress, not only for physical reasons, but also because: teens must adapt their self-image on an ongoing basis as they develop physical emotionally Social

  2. The five stressors that the youth cited as causing the most worry included “ school work (68%), parents (56%), friends’ problems (52%), romantic relationships (48%), and drugs in the neighborhood (48%).” Friends and family are both cures and causes for bad stressors so it can work both ways.

    • Mental illness. Growing up, teenagers experience new external and internal struggles that can be emotionally overwhelming. According to youth.gov, 1 in 5 youth meets the criteria for a severe mental health disorder.
    • Peer pressure. All people naturally want to fit in and be liked by others, but adolescents feel this pressure intensely. Negative peer pressure includes pressure to use alcohol and drugs, participate in sexual acts, or engage in risky behaviours.
    • Pressure to succeed academically. The stress and anxiety of academics can be challenging for youth to effectively manage. Teens may worry that a less-than-ideal academic performance will lead to being judged by their peers, scolded by their parents, or rejected by universities.
    • Uncertainty about the future. Today’s teens often feel lost and have a scrambled sense of direction. This sometimes ends up creating an identity crisis or a loss of ambition.
    • Academic Stress
    • Family Stress
    • Peer Relationships

    Academic stress is more real today for teens than ever before. Given the soaring costs of a college education, the pressure to earn scholarships is enormous. Students are also inundated with hours of homework for each class. Many students opt to take advanced placement classes to try to earn college credit, and these classes often come with college...

    A healthy, safe, and loving family is essential for the development of any child. However, family relationships can bring additional stress to students. Parents going through their own emotional or mental health problems can disrupt a teen's life. Teenagers may feel responsible for their parent's actions, or become the victim of physical or emotion...

    Relationships are hard at any age. Understanding what you want and being able to communicate that to other people while respecting their needs is difficult. Teen brains are still developing, particularly in the frontal lobe, which controls executive functions and emotions. Teenagers are still figuring out who they are, and that involves a lot of tr...

    • Academic Stress. From grades to test scores to applying to college, teens experience high levels of school-related stress. Many teens worry about meeting academic demands, pleasing teachers and parents, and keeping up with their classmates.
    • Social Stress. Teens place a high value on their social lives. They spend the majority of their waking hours among their peers, and finding and keeping their tribes can include stress at times.
    • Family Discord. Stress trickles down, and anything that impacts the family can affect the teen. Unrealistic expectations, marital problems, strained sibling relationships (including sibling bullying), illness in the family, and financial stress on the family can all trigger a spike in teen stress.
    • World Events. School shootings, acts of terrorism, and natural disasters worry parents, but they also trigger stress for teens. Teens are often privy to the 24-hour news cycle, and hearing bits and pieces of scary news, both domestic and abroad, can leave teens wondering about their safety and the safety of their loved ones.
  3. Nov 24, 2020 · Unrealistic expectations, marital problems, strained sibling relationships (including sibling bullying), illness in the family, and financial stress on the family can all trigger a spike in teen stress. World Events School shootings, acts of terrorism, and natural disasters worry parents, but they also trigger stress for teens.