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  1. Eastern Orthodox Church Beliefs and Practices

    www.learnreligions.com › eastern-orthodox-church
    • Eastern Orthodox Beliefs vs. Roman Catholic
    • Eastern Orthodoxy vs. Protestantism
    • Eastern Orthodox Beliefs vs. Western Christianity
    • Eastern Orthodox Church Beliefs
    • Sources

    The primary dispute that led to the split between Eastern Orthodoxy and Roman Catholicismcentered around Rome's deviation from the original conclusions of the seven ecumenical councils, such as the claim to a universal papal supremacy. Another particular conflict is known as the Filioque Controversy. The Latin word filioque means "and from the Son." It had been inserted into the Nicene Creed during the 6th century, thus changing the phrase pertaining to the origin of the Holy Spiritfrom "who proceeds from the Father" to "who proceeds from the Father and the Son." It had been added to emphasize Christ's divinity, but Eastern Christians not only objected to the altering of anything produced by the first ecumenical councils, but they also disagreed with its new meaning. Eastern Christians believe both the Spirit and the Son have their origin in the Father.

    A clear distinction between Eastern Orthodoxy and Protestantism is the concept of "Sola Scriptura." This "Scripture alone" doctrine held by Protestant faiths asserts that the Word of God can be clearly understood and interpreted by the individual believer and is sufficient on its own to be the final authority in Christian doctrine. Orthodoxy argues that the Holy Scriptures (as interpreted and defined by church teachings in the first seven ecumenical councils) along with Holy Tradition are of equal value and importance.

    A less apparent distinction between Eastern Orthodoxy and Western Christianity is their differing theological approaches, which is, perhaps, merely the result of cultural influences. The Eastern mindset is inclined toward philosophy, mysticism, and ideology, whereas the Western outlook is guided more by a practical and legal mentality. This can be seen in the subtly different ways that Eastern and Western Christians approach spiritual truth. Orthodox Christians believe that truth must be personally experienced and, as a result, they place less emphasis on its precise definition. Worship is the center of church life in Eastern Orthodoxy. It is highly liturgical, embracing seven sacraments and characterized by a priestly and mystical nature. Veneration of icons and a mystical form of meditative prayer are commonly incorporated into religious rituals.

    Authority of Scripture: The Holy Scriptures (as interpreted and defined by church teaching in the first seven ecumenical councils) along with Holy Tradition are of equal value and importance.
    Baptism: Baptismis the initiator of the salvation experience. Eastern Orthodox practice baptism by full immersion.
    Eucharist: The Eucharist is the center of worship. Eastern Orthodoxbelieve that during the Eucharist adherents partake mystically of Christ's body and blood and through it receive his life and stre...
    Holy Spirit: The Holy Spirit is one of the persons of the Trinity, who proceeds from the Father and is one in essence with the Father. The Holy Spirit is given by Christ as a gift to the church, to...
    The Orthodox Page in America
    Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of America
  2. Often asked: Orthodox Christianity Why Not Be Another ...

    www.paramountchristian.org › christianity-around

    Eastern Orthodox Christians believe in a single God who is both three and one (triune); the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit, “one in essence and undivided”. The Holy Trinity is three “unconfused” and distinct divine persons (hypostases), who share one divine essence (ousia); uncreated, immaterial and eternal.

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  4. An Orthodox Christian View of Non-Christian Religions ...

    www.goarch.org › - › an-orthodox-christian-view-of
    • Guidance Provided by Patriarch Bartholomew
    • Revelation Through God's Glory, Even Though The Mystery Is "Beyond"
    • The Human Person: in The Image and Likeness of God
    • Three Views of Non-Christian Religions
    • Scriptural Affirmation of The Centrality of Christ
    • Dialogue with Non-Christian Religions
    • The Study of World Religions
    • Truth and Tolerance
    • Conclusion

    Let us begin with certain remarks offered by Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew of Constantinople to the Conference on Interreligious Dialogue,Istanbul, March 7, 1998. The Patriarch began with the observation that this conference was convened to discuss important issues of religious truth - in peace. He pointed out that most participants unhesitatingly believe that the religion to which each subscribes is the bearer of God's truth. He noted that the study of world religions makes it clear that perceptions of God, world and man do not coincide; indeed they are often contradictory. And he asked: How can we hold discussions in good faith when each of us is firmly convinced of the truth in his own religion? The Patriarch proposed two important ways as guides. The first is a strong emphasis on means, which permit people of various faiths to coexist and interact in peace. The second is to seek mutual understanding - in depth - of the teachings of religions about which we engage in dialogue....

    Our exploration of an Orthodox attitude toward non-Christian religions begins with the Christian understanding of God. Emphasis is on the mystery of divine reality - the essence of God - which exceeds human capabilities. It is a basic truth of Orthodox Christianity that God's essence is incomprehensible and inaccessible to the human person; it is "beyond" all creaturely approach. A prayer in the Divine Liturgy expresses it as follows: "... for you are God ineffable, beyond comprehension, invisible, beyond understanding, existing forever and always the same ... "A minor change in the rendition emphasizes the fundamental truth. God's essence is totally "beyond" - "beyond verbalization, beyond comprehension, beyond vision, beyond understanding." Yet, while the essence of God is beyond communion, God reveals Himself through His Glory. The human person participates in God's energies manifested as theophanies "The glory of the Triune God embraces the universe (ta pania) and brings all thi...

    Our exploration continues with examination of man's relationship to God. The basic, all-encompassing Christian understanding is that all human persons are created in the image of God. This is linked to a related insight - how God relates to all human persons. In turn, this is linked to yet another insight - how all human persons relate to all other human persons. This has been expressed more concisely as "an orientation, a direction, a relationship of persons." The primary vector in this complex of relationships is vertical, that is, the relationship of man to God. Yetthis vertical relationship with God is incomplete without the secondary, horizontal vector - the relationship of each human person to all other human persons. The bonding agent in this relationship of persons - God and humanity - is mutual love. The ultimate example is provided by the Holy Trinity, where the bond among the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit is reciprocal love. Therefore, the bond among the persons who...

    An Orthodox scholar recently observed that there are basically three views that Christians have taken with regard to non-Christian religions. The first is that the non-Christian will be damned because there is no salvation outside the visible Body of Christ, the Church, The second is that the non-Christian may be saved in spite the religion he practices, but only through the mercy of God. The third is that the non-Christian may be saved by means of the very religion he practices, for nonChristian religions may also contain saving truths.These three views parallel the three approaches identified elsewhere as exclusivism. inclusivism and cultural pluralism. The claim of exclusivism has been rejected by many Orthodox scholars as untenable. This is not done in the interests of facilitating missionary endeavors or to foster world peace. Exclusiveness is rejected as a matter of Truth.The majority of Orthodox scholars would accept inclusivism. Some Orthodox scholars espouse the view charac...

    Let us note that theology is not speculation; it is experience in and of the Body of Christ. The study of theology proceeds in consonance with the Tradition of the Church: its liturgy, its "unwritten" experiences. Scripture, writings of the Fathers, doctrine and canons. The challenges and opportunities attendant to today's religious pluralism must be addressed with Christian conviction, and the dialogue which addresses our concerns for the present and future must harmonize with our roots in our past. The Christian message of the Good News of Salvation is central. Jesus Christ tells us, "I am the Way, the Truth, and the Life. No one comes to the Father except through me" (John 14:6). Peter confesses at Phillipi, "You are the Christ" (Mark 8:29). Saint Paul declares, "He is the Image of the invisible God, the first born of all creation; for in Him all things are created" (Col. 1:15). The Scriptures abound with unequivocal affirmations of the Incarnation and the foundational beliefs th...

    The Orthodox view of dialogue with other religions is also rooted in the Church Fathers. Subsequent to the Apostolic age St. Justin Martyr, a second century apologist, makes the claim for Christianity that "Whatever things were rightly said among all men are the property of us Christians." Justin espouses the belief that both Gentiles and Jews will be saved on the basis of their piety and holiness. He states that "Christ is the first-born of God, and we have declared above all that He is the Word (Logos) of whom every race of men were partakers; and those who lived according to reason are Christian." All peoples are able to participate in the "spermatikos logos" or seed of reason: "For each man spoke well in proportion to the share he had of the spermatic word (reason disseminated among men), seeing what was related to it," because "the seed of reason (the Logos) implanted in every race of men" makes God's revelation accessible to all The pre-existence of the eternal Logos of God en...

    There have been significant twentieth century developments, firmly rooted in Scripture and the Church Fathers, in the Orthodox view of nonChristian religions, beginning with the work of Leonidas John Philippides in the 1930s. The study of world religions has become a major discipline in the curriculum of Orthodox Theological Schools, Academic chairs have been established in the Schools of Theology at both Athens and Thessalonike, where ongoing efforts in the history of world religions and in the study of comparative religion flourish. In addition to outstanding major studies and innumerable articles there are first-class textbooks supporting academic programs. These developments witness a powerful Orthodox theological concern with issues of religious Truth, and a willingness to pursue that Truth wherever it may lead. The prominent Orthodox Christian apologist, Gregorios Papamichael, University of Athens. espouses the view that humanity was gradually prepared for the revelation of th...

    As has been emphasized, the issue of Christian Truth is of highest importance in the Orthodox view of other religions. Pontius Pilate asked "What is Truth?" (John 18:38). He posed this question to Jesus who standing before him, remained silent. Christians interpret this silence as His reply that the Truth was standing before him - Christ is the Truth. The Byzantine Empire identified itself as an Orthodox Christian state, however, it allowed for diversity of religious practices within its borders. "In Byzantium, the recognition of Christianity first as a privileged religion, and then as the official religion of the Empire, did not affect the basic principle of tolerance toward the members of other religions. But it restricted the rights they were permitted in public life. Christianity and, after the East-West schism (1054), Orthodoxy were closely linked to the identity of the Byzantine state and thus determined its religious policies." For Orthodoxy there is a fusion between the trut...

    Orthodox Christianity sees dialogue not only as proper, but also necessary, in the inevitable interactions with other religions, Interfaith dialogueis best cultivated in an atmosphere of peace and with preparations which emphasize mutual in-depth understanding as the desirable way. There are risks in dialogue, particularly if preparation is inadequate or if there is overemphasis on accommodation. However, the risks of no dialogue are greater. It is basic Christian doctrine that the Holy Spirit may act wherever and whenever. Presuming to constrain the activity of the Holy Spirit - to limit God Himself- is not the way. Orthodoxy recognizes and accepts the mandate to seek Truth and to follow the Holy Spirit wherever He leads, including in other religions or philosophies when his Truth is to be found there. The way of Orthodoxy is to converge on the golden mean, carefully avoiding extremes and the pitfalls that can lead to destruction. The Tradition of the Church fosters the understandi...

  5. Compare Beliefs of 7 Major Christian Denominations

    www.learnreligions.com › comparing-christian
    • Basis for Doctrine. Christian denominations differ in what they use for the basis of their doctrines and beliefs. The biggest split is between Catholicism and the denominations that have roots in the Protestant Reformation.
    • Creeds and Confessions. To understand what different Christian denominations believe, you can start with the ancient creeds and confessions, which spell out their major beliefs in a short summary.
    • Inerrancy and Inspiration of Scripture. Christian denominations differ in how they view the authority of Scripture. The Inspiration of Scripture identifies the belief that God, by the power of the Holy Spirit, directed the writing of the Scriptures.
    • The Trinity. The mysterious doctrine of the Trinity created divisions in the earliest days of Christianity and those differences remain in Christian denominations until this day.
  6. What are the main oriental orthodox beliefs and are they ...

    www.quora.com › What-are-the-main-oriental

    Oriental orthodox are a subset of Christians — so they are Christians. Christianity has three broad categories — Catholic, Orthodox and Protestant. Oriental orthodox separated from the rest of the Christian Church in the 400’s AD over a disagreement about Christ’s nature or natures. This is called the Chalcedonian Schism.

  7. Christianity: Basic Beliefs | URI

    www.uri.org › kids › world-religions
    • How Did Christianity Begin?
    • What Do Christians Believe?
    • What Are The Sacred Texts of Christianity?
    • Why Are There So Many Different Kinds of Christians?

    Christianity traces its beginning to the miraculous birth, adult ministry, death and resurrection of Jesus of Nazareth, known as Jesus Christ. Over 2000 years ago in Palestine (today's Israel), Jesus was born into a humble Jewish family. His mother was a young peasant woman named Mary. Christians believe that his father was the Holy Spirit of God, making Jesus both fully human and fully divine. His earliest followers came to believe that he was the Messiah, or messenger, sent by God to free God's people from slavery, sin, and death. God sent his son Jesus in human form so that people would better understand God as a caring and loving parent. Jesus lived and experienced the suffering of humans. Jesus healed the sick and told stories, or parables, and preached sermons that taught what God wanted people to do – to love God with all their hearts and love their neighbors as themselves. Jesus taught by example. By being loving and forgiving himself, Jesus taught others to be loving and fo...

    Christians believe that Jesus Christ was the Son of God – fully human and fully divine – and that through believing in him and following his teachings they can inherit eternal life. Christians believe that Jesus died for humanity, that God raised him from the dead, and that Jesus will come again at the end of time. In addition, Christians believe in the Trinity, or the three parts of God: God the Father or Creator, God the Son (Jesus) or Redeemer, and God the Holy Spirit or Sanctifier. The Holy Spirit is God's presence in the world.

    The sacred text of Christianity is the Holy Bible. The Christian Bible has two parts: the Old Testament which is essentially the Hebrew scriptures of Jesus' time; and the New Testament which contains writings about Jesus Christ and about the early church. The four gospels (a word meaning ‘good news') of the New Testament are accounts of Jesus' life and teaching, of his death and resurrection. The New Testament also contains the Acts of the Apostles, which describes the early growth of the Christian church; the letters of Paul and other important leaders in the early church; the Letter to the Hebrews; and the Book of Revelation. The New Testament teaches that salvation comes through believing in the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ and in following his teachings. It teaches that salvation is a gift God extends freely through Jesus Christ to all people.

    From its beginning with a tiny group of Jesus' followers, Christianity has spread all over the world. Today, it is practiced by two billion people. As with any large group, Christianity has experienced many different interpretations, disagreements and struggles for power over the centuries. These have led to the growth of many different branches of Christianity interpreting the life, death and resurrection of Jesus in different ways. There are three basic streams of Christianity: Orthodox, Protestant and Roman Catholic.

  8. Q&A: A closer look at Orthodox Christians | Pew Research Center

    www.pewresearch.org › fact-tank › 2017/11/14

    Nov 14, 2017 · Q&A: A closer look at Orthodox Christians. By David Masci. Along with Roman Catholicism and Protestantism, Orthodox Christianity is one of the world’s three major Christian traditions. But unlike the other two large branches of Christianity, which have spread throughout the developing world, Orthodoxy remains largely confined to Europe.

  9. Differences between major religions — Consumption and ...

    www.consumptionandenvironment.com › home

    May 07, 2020 · Other well-known religions are mostly ethnic; for example, 14 million people or 0.18% of the world's population practice Judaism. Christianity . Christians believe that God had created Earth and sent his son Jesus (the Messiah) to save the world. In our calendar, the 1 A.D. is the year of the beginning of the Christian era, but that naming ...

  10. Are Different Denominations Actually Different Religions ...

    www.christianforums.com › threads › are-different

    There naturally will be differences in belief but the main beliefs will be the same like Christ is God and died and resurrected etc. "Denominations" that differ with the main beliefs can and are considered different religions (often just known as non Christians even if they believe in Jesus in some ways)

  11. Faith groups within Christianity - religious tolerance

    www.religioustolerance.org › christ7

    Five religious groupings: Christian Churches Together in the USA (CCT) recognizes six families of Christian faith groups: Evangelical, Pentecostal, Historic Protestant, Historic Racial/Ethnic, Eastern Orthodox, and. Roman Catholic 3.

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