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  1. The federal government of the United States (U.S. federal government or U.S. government) is the national government of the United States, a federal republic in North America, composed of 50 states, a city within a federal district (the city of Washington in the District of Columbia, where the entire federal government is based), five major self-governing territories and several island possessions.

  2. In a federal system, power is divided between the federal (or national) government and the state governments. Great or explicit powers, called enumerated powers, were granted to the federal government to declare war, impose taxes, coin and regulate currency, regulate foreign and interstate commerce, raise and maintain an army and a navy ...

  3. Powers not granted to the Federal government are reserved for States and the people, which are divided between State and local governments. Most Americans have more frequent contact with their ...

  4. Apr 16, 2020 · Federalism, or the separation of powers between the state and federal government, was entirely new when the founders baked it into the Constitution. ... Those so-called “reserved” powers ...

  5. Mar 21, 2022 · State vs. Federal Power . The line between the powers of the U.S. government and those of the states is usually clear. Sometimes, it is not. Whenever a state government's exercise of power might be in conflict with the Constitution, there is a battle of “states' rights” which must often be settled by the U.S. Supreme Court.

  6. The separation of powers between the state and federal government is not clear cut and leads to tensions and disputes between the different levels of government. The creation of time zones and daylight saving time and current government responses to the COVID-19 pandemic are two revealing historical examples of those tensions.

  7. Each state, as a party to the compact, has a "right to judge for itself" the extent of the federal government's powers. When the federal government acts beyond the scope of its delegated powers, a state may determine that the federal government's "acts are unauthoritative, void, and of no force".