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    What are the most popular German words?

    What are some common German sayings?

    What are some common German expressions?

    How can I learn German words?

  2. 1000 Most Common German Words - Top German vocabulary

    languagedaily.com/.../vocabulary/common-german-words

    der, des, dem, den -- the German definite article; masculine " the " form. die, der, den -- the German definite article; feminine " the " form. das, des, dem -- the German definite article; neuter " the " form. ein, eine, einen, einer, einem, eines -- the German indefinite article; " a, an ".

    Rank
    German word
    English translation
    Part of speech
    1.
    das
    the (definitive article; nominative/accusative singular neuter of "der"); this, that (demonstrative pronoun); who, that, which (relative pronoun)
    definitive article; demonstrative pronoun; relative pronoun
    2.
    ist
    (he/she/it) is (3rd-person singular present of "sein")
    verb
    3.
    du
    you (informal; addressing one person)
    personal pronoun
    4.
    ich
    I (not capitalized unless it is in the beginning of a sentence); ego (capitalized - Ich)
    personal pronoun; noun
  3. Most Frequent German Words in Speech and Writing

    www.thoughtco.com/german-words-in-written...
    • der (den, dem, des) "the" m. - definite article.
    • die (der, den) "the" f. - definite article.
    • und. "and" - coordinating conjunction.
    • in (im) "in, into" (in the)
  4. The Most Frequent German Words – Deutsch 101-326

    resources.german.lsa.umich.edu/.../frequent-words

    The Most Frequent German Words Pronouns and Possessive Articles Der- and ein-words Modal and Auxiliary Verbs Numbers and Ordinal Numbers Prepositions Common Contractions Fragewörter [only the most common question words appear here] Coordinating Conjunctions (Verb in position 2) Subordinating ...

  5. Top 100 German Words - Most common words in German

    www.vistawide.com/german/top_100_german_words.htm
    • der / die / das (def. art.) the; (dem. pron.) that, those; (rel.
    • und (conj.) and.
    • sein (verb) to be; (aux./ perfect tense)
    • in (prep.) in [variation: im in the]
    • Hallo. = Hello. Let's naturally start with "Hallo" which means "Hello" in German. This is one of the most known words...
    • Liebe = love
  6. 10 Commonly-Used German Slang Words and Phrases

    takelessons.com/blog/german-slang-z12
    • Super! Don’t confuse the word “super” with “Suppe,” which sounds almost exactly the same. Used much in the same way we use it in English, “super” is a word I’ve heard the most since learning German.
    • Na? “Na” is an informal way to say “hello.” Use it in place of the American slang phrase, “Yo, how’s it going?” You can even say it as a response to itself.
    • Naja. This German slang word is one that I use most often. It’s used the same way as “well…” is used at the start of a sentence. It gives you a little extra time to think about what case the articles of the following sentence will be in.
    • Auf jeden Fall. This is a great way to wrap up a thought. It’s also easy to assimilate, considering how similar “auf jeden Fall” is to the English phrase “in any case.”
  7. What are the most common 1500 words in German that are the ...

    www.quora.com/What-are-the-most-common-1500...

    Jan 24, 2019 · The German federal education administrations published a number of lists of a German Grundwortschatz or Basiswortschatz (the same meaning) in the internet, basically the most frequently used words.

  8. 10 Useful German Phrases That Germans Actually Use

    www.babbel.com/en/magazine/the-ultimate-list-of...
    • Das ist nicht mein Bier. Literally: That is not my beer. Meaning: I’m not interested; I don’t like it. It’s no secret that Germans love their beer — and also the occasional American IPA or Irish Guinness.
    • Drück mir die Daumen. Literally: Press your thumbs for me! Meaning: Wish me luck! Try pressing your thumbs to the rest of your fingers. Looks a lot like a fist, right?
    • Jetzt mal Butter bei die Fische. Literally: Now butter for the fish. Meaning: Get to the point! Not only is this a useful phrase to ask someone to pass the butter, it’s also your key to interrupting a tedious rant.
    • Abwarten und Tee trinken. Literally: Wait and drink tea. Meaning: Wait and see. This useful phrase might be the most elegant way of expressing both your inability to change a future outcome as well as your acceptance of said outcome.
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