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  1. A brief history of circa The word circa is a derivative of the Latin word meaning approximately or around. You can abbreviate circa as “ca.” or “ca,” while it can infrequently appear as: “c.”, “circ.” or “cca.” Also, linguists traced back the word circa to the Roman word circus, or, in other words, circular, round arena.

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  2. If something says ‘circa 1921’ it means the photo was taken around 1921, but there is no way of knowing the exact date. In other words, we think it was 1921 but could have been a year or two either side of that estimate. Circa = around 3 level 1 · 22 hr. ago "Around."

  3. Mar 31, 2022 · This means that anyone who took a COVID vaccine shot, walks out, and falls over dead on the street of a heart attack or stroke is counted as a death of an “unvaccinated” person. The study cited in the Reuters article is “ COVID-19 Vaccination and Non-COVID-19 Mortality Risk.” Below source Crippling COVID injection reactions (view in Bitchute)

    • BC/AD Or BCE/CE
    • Circa
    • et Cetera
    • et al.
    • Sic
    • Stat

    Let’s start with the eras, BC and AD, or BCE and CE. We use “BC” and “AD” in many parts of the world to show whether a time happened before or after the believed birth of Jesus Christ. It's the current date that began approximately 2,020 years ago in the Gregorian calendar. "AD" is the abbreviation of "anno Domini," which is Latin for "in the year ...

    You just heard me say "circa" a minute ago, which is another Latin term that means "around" or "approximately." So when I said "circa 1708," I meant around the year 1708. The word comes from the Latin word "circum," which is where we also get the words "circle," "circumvent," and "circumference" which is the measurement around a circle. You can use...

    You also just heard me say "et cetera," or as it was written in my script, "E-T-C." Both Dictionary.com and Merriam Webster's online dictionary, spell "etcetera" as one word in English (E-T-C-E-T-E-R-A), but it is two words in Latin ("et cetera"), and it is still most often written as two words in English. It means "and the other things" or "and th...

    Just like "et cetera," "et al." has two parts: E-T A-L, and it's Latin for "And Al." Just kidding, it means "and others," and it's an abbreviation for "et alia," but it is used to refer only to people. In fact, to help you remember the difference between "et cetera" and "et al.," just think of "And Al." Since Al is a person, "et al." refers to peop...

    "Sic" is the shortened version for the Latin phrase "sic erat scriptum," which means "Thus it was written," which makes things sound important when you say it out loud. Try it the next time you put together your grocery list. "Sic" is usually used when you're citing text, and the cited work has mistakes in it, like grammar or spelling errors. You t...

    Finally, there's "stat," S-T-A-T, which is short for "statim." It means "immediately" or "instantly." It comes from the Proto-Indo-European root word "sta," which means "to stand." It's where we get words like "static" as in "not moving," "station," "stationary," and even "statue." You hear people say "stat" on a lot of hospital shows, as in "This ...

    • 1 – The Gecko
    • 2 – Cavemen
    • 3 – Kash
    • 4 – Rhetorical Questions
    • 5 – Talking Objects
    • 6 – Motorcycles & Toys
    • But Wait… There’S more!
    • The Agency’S Rationale
    • What Do You Think

    The gecko first appeared in 1999 during a Screen Actors Guild strike that prevented the use of live actors. In the gecko’s first TV debut, he pleads for people confusing “gecko” with “GEICO” to stop phoning him. The gecko speaks with an English (Cockney) accent. Why? Because it would be unexpected, according to GEICO’s ad shop, the Martin Agency. M...

    These metrosexual cavemen have somehow eluded extinction while developing a taste for racquet sports, plasma TVs, and “duck with mango salsa.” They are insulted by GEICO’s ad tagline, “So easy, a caveman can do it.” GEICO and its ad agency tried to capitalize on the success of their Cavemen with a TV series in the fall of 2007. The move made GEICO ...

    Starting in 2008, GEICO has aired a series of TV ads featuring two paper-banded stacks of U.S. bills with a pair of big, buggy eyes on top. Kash, who never says anything, just sits and stares at people (it’s intentionally creepy), set to an obnoxious remix of a Rockwell/Michael Jackson song, “Somebody’s Watching Me.” Message:“This [stack of cash] i...

    An actor asks the familiar question, “Could switching to Geico save you 15% or more on car insurance?” He then follows up with a rhetorical question: “Does Charlie Daniels play a mean fiddle?” or “Did The Waltons take way too long to say goodnight?” Message:“15 minutes could save you 15% or more.”

    Objects causing damage to people’s cars — a pothole, a fire hydrant and the fender of another car — stumble through feeble apologies. Message: “Accidents are bad. But GEICO’s good, with emergency road service.”

    GEICO’s division for motorcycles, RVs and other toys has an entirely different campaign. These ads occasionally feature cameo appearances of the Gecko and Cavemen, but not usually. Most of them are markedly less creative than any of GEICO’s other spots. Message:“You could save with GEICO motor cycle insurance.”

    There’s a multitude of different spots GIECO rolls out every year, and no two campaigns are ever the same. In 2003, Geico debuted a campaign called “Good News,” featuring ads where one character would break bad news to another, ending with the tagline: “I’ve got good news! I just saved a bunch of money on my car insurance by switching to GEICO.” In...

    The Martin Agency has given different assignments to multiple creative teams, along with instructions “to tell multiple, distinct narratives that highlight various aspects of the brand.” “Once upon a time, an ad was about a company’s unique selling position. But people can now accept more complex brands,” Mike Hughes, The Martin Agency’s president ...

    How do you feel about the mish-mash of ad campaigns GEICO uses to build its brand? Please take the poll below. You can check all answers that apply. Also, feel free to leave your thoughts and questions in a comment. Key Questions:Before you take the poll, ask yourself how many of GEICO’s brand messages can you recall? Do you know “it’s so easy, a c...

  4. Mar 26, 2022 · “Common sense” would mean police doing their job to reduce the accidents. “Common sense” would require proper training before receiving a drivers license. “Common sense” would remind drivers to not drive too fast and too close to other. ”Common sense” would mean no need for lucky amulets and car-blessings.

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