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      • In bartending, the terms "straight up" and "up" ordinarily refer to an alcoholic drink that is shaken or stirred with ice and then strained and served in a stemmed glass without ice. "Straight" ordinarily refers to a single, unmixed liquor served without any water, ice, or other mixer.
      en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bartending_terminology
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    What does straight up and up mean in bartending?

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  2. Nov 04, 2020 · Up usually describes a drink that is chilled with ice —either shaken or stirred —and strained into a glass without ice. Typically, these drinks are associated with a cocktail glass , and this makes it easy to remember. Just think of it as being served in a glass that is elevated (up) by a stem. Up and straight up are often used interchangeably.

    • Cocktail Book Author And Mixologist
  3. May 09, 2008 · At bartending school we were explicitly told, up, neat, straight and straight up all mean the same thing. Warm shot right out of the bottle. Although “straight up” was used to refer to cocktails that are mixed with ice then strained into a chilled glass.

  4. Oct 29, 2017 · Straight up What it is: Here’s where the confusion begins. ‘Straight up’ can be used to mean the same as ‘neat’ when it comes to spirits usually drunk at room temperature, but is also used interchangeable with ‘up’ if it’s understood that it’s a drink meant to be served cold.

    • Definitions and Usage
    • Well and Top-Shelf
    • Sizes
    • See Also

    Straight, up, and straight up

    In bartending, the terms "straight up" and "up" ordinarily refer to an alcoholic drink that is shaken or stirred with ice and then strained and served in a stemmed glass without ice. "Straight" ordinarily refers to a single, unmixed liquor served without any water, ice, or other mixer. In this sense, "straight" can sometimes be used as a synonym for either "straight up" or "neat". Furthermore, "straight" is also a term of art for a particular type of whiskey produced in the United States. Uni...

    Neat

    A drink served "neat" is a single, unmixed liquor served without being chilled and without any water, ice, or other mixer. Neat drinks are typically served in a rocks glass, shot glass, snifter, Glencairn glass, or copita.

    On the rocks

    "On the rocks" refers to liquor poured over ice cubes, and a "rocks drink" is a drink served on the rocks. Rocks drinks are typically served in a rocks glass, highball glass, or Collins glass, all of which refer to a relatively straight-walled, flat-bottomed glass; the rocks glass is typically the shortest and widest, followed by the highball which is taller and often narrower, then the Collins which is taller and narrower still.

    Drinks establishments will often have a lower-priced category of drinks, known as "well drinks" or "rail drinks", and a higher-priced category known as "top-shelf" or "call" drinks, and will use upsellingby offering the higher-priced category when taking orders. The terms come from the relative positions of the bottles of spirit used for the drinks; the cheapest version of a spirit offered by a bar is typically stored in a long rail or "well" making it readily available to a busy bartender, while the more expensive, better-quality liqueurs and spirits are displayed on shelves behind the bar where they attract patrons to the available selection.

    Alcoholic beverages are sold in a wide variety of sizes, for example: 1. A "pony" is slang for one US fluid ounce (30 ml) of spirit, while the standard-size "shot" of alcohol is a 1.5-US-fluid-ounce (44 ml) "jigger", with a "double" being three US fluid ounces (89 ml). 2. A "middy", commonly known as a "pot" in Queensland and Victoria, Australia, is 10 oz / 285ml. 3. A "schooner" may refer to various glasses for beer, typically of size 15 oz / 425ml in Australia, or 2⁄3 imperial pint (379 ml) in the United Kingdom. 4. A "pint" is a common size for a beer in the UK (20 oz / 568ml). Rather than use measuring equipment, professional bartenders usually use a pour spout inserted into the mouth of the bottle, which restricts the flow of liquid to a standard rate allowing reasonably accurate time-based pours. For instance, a "6-count" is a common analogue for a 1.5oz jigger, which can be trained to by having the bartender upend the bottle (with pour spout installed) and counting to 6 out l...

    • Neat vs. Up vs. Straight Up
    • Dry vs. Wet
    • Over vs. on The Rocks
    • Back vs. Chaser
    • Seltzer vs. Soda
    • Twist vs. Squeeze

    These three terms are probably the most misused bartending terms of all. Here's what they actually mean: Neat: Order your whiskey neat if you want it to be poured straight into a glass, at room temperature, without ice. Up: Want that drink chilled instead? But still without ice? Order it "up" and the bartender will shake it with ice, then strain it into a stemmed cocktail glass. The "stemmed" part is important here since it's the added elevation that gives us the "up" here. Conversely, if you wanted the same thing, just served in a rocks glass, you could ask for it served down. However, that term has largely fallen out of fashion, and might perplex all but the most seasoned of bartenders. If he or she gives you a funny look, try ordering it chilledinstead. Straight up: The term "straight up" technically isn't a real bartending term at all, but is what a lot of people mistakenly ask for when they really want their drink served neat. So how did it become a thing? No one knows for sure...

    The terms "dry" and "wet" are most commonly used when ordering martinis and they can actually be a little confusing. The dryin a dry martini refers to the vermouth used in the cocktail (which also happens to be "dry"). So you might assume that a dry martini is extra on the dry vermouth. But you'd be wrong. Dry, in this case, actually means "easy on the", so when you order a dry martini, you're ordering a martini that goes lighter on the dry vermouth. If you want it with just a hint of vermouth (like Winston Churchill did), try ordering it extra dry. If, on the other hand, you want the bartender to go heavy on the vermouth, you'll want your martini wet or extra wet. You probably won't want to apply this logic to other drinks, though. Ordering a "dry manhattan", for instance, won't get you a manhattan that's heavy on the rye and light on the sweet vermouth. A dry manhattan is its own thing—a manhattan made with dry vermouth, instead of sweet, and garnished with olives.

    Finally! An easy one! Over and on the rocks both mean the same thing: served over ice. "On the rocks" has become the more ubiquitous term thanks to its use in movies and TV shows, but "over" is still a common term in some areas of the country or with bar patrons of a certain age.

    A back and a chaser are basically the same thing: a glass of something else that accompanies your main drink. But they tend to be used a little differently. A "back" is typically a drink that is sipped alongside another drink, while a "chaser" is meant to follow a drink that's thrown back quickly. Here are some examples: "Bartender, a whiskey neat with a water back." As opposed to: "I'll take a shot of whiskey with a soda chaser." The terms can be used interchangeably without confusion though, so fire (or gingerly sip) away!

    Who knew that even the cocktail mixerscan be confusing? Most people know that tonic water is its own thing, but what about all those other bubbly waters behind the bar? Here's what you need to know: Seltzer: If you're looking for plain, carbonated water with nothing else in it, seltzer is the mixer you're looking for. Club soda: Club soda might seem like the same thing as seltzer, but it actually has minerals added to it that give it a subtle difference in flavor. Some people prefer one over the other, while others can't tell the difference or don't care. Either way, bars have both on hand, so choose whichever you like best.

    Believe it or not, this is a common bartending terminology mistake that results in a lot of drinks being sent back—usually because the customer doesn't understand what a twist really is. A twist is a thin piece of citrus peel that the bartender twists over the drink to express the flavorful citrus oils into it. The peel is then usually dropped into the drink or draped across the rim of the glass as a garnish. You won't get any juice from a twist. If what you really want is a squeeze of citrus or a wedgeof lemon or lime served with your drink, be sure to ask specifically for that.

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