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  1. Doxycycline: 7 things you should know - Drugs.com

    www.drugs.com/tips/doxycycline-patient-tips
    • How it works. Doxycycline is an antibiotic used to treat a wide range of infections caused by susceptible gram negative, gram positive, anaerobic, and other bacteria.
    • Upsides. Active against a wide range of bacteria including some gram negative and positive bacteria, anaerobes, and some parasites (such as Balantidium coli and Entamoeba species).
    • Downsides. If you are between the ages of 18 and 60, take no other medication or have no other medical conditions, side effects you are more likely to experience include
    • Bottom Line. Doxycycline is an effective antibiotic that treats a wide range of infections. However, it is not usually recommended for children aged less than eight nor in pregnant women in the last half of pregnancy.
  2. Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a major public health challenge, and the current antiviral arsenal for treatment is limited, with questionable efficacy. Major efforts are under way for discovery of new effective agents, but the validation of new potential treatments for COVID-19 may take a lo …

    • Alexandre E. Malek, Bruno P. Granwehr, Dimitrios P. Kontoyiannis
    • 16
    • 2020
    • About doxycycline. Doxycycline is an antibiotic. It's used to treat infections such as chest infections, skin infections, rosacea, dental infections and sexually transmitted infections (STIs), as well as a lot of other rare infections.
    • Key facts. For most infections, you'll start to feel better in a few days but it is important to finish the course of medicine. The most common side effects of doxycycline are headaches, feeling or being sick.
    • Who can and can't take doxycycline. Doxycycline can be taken by adults and children over 12 years old. Doxycycline is not usually recommended in pregnancy or when breastfeeding.
    • How and when to take it. Your dose of doxycycline depends on why you are taking it. The usual dose is 100mg to 200mg once or twice a day. If you're taking doxycycline more than once a day, try to space your doses evenly throughout the day.
  3. Doxycycline Monohydrate Oral: Uses, Side Effects ...

    www.webmd.com/drugs/2/drug-8773-7073/doxycycline...
    • Preparation
    • Administration
    • Prevention
    • Risks
    • Treatment

    Read the Patient Information Leaflet if available from your pharmacist before you start taking doxycycline and each time you get a refill. If you have any questions, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

    This medication is best taken by mouth on an empty stomach, at least 1 hour before or 2 hours after a meal, usually 1 or 2 times daily or as directed by your doctor. Take this medication with a full glass of water (8 ounces/240 milliliters) unless directed otherwise. If stomach upset occurs, taking it with food or milk may help. However, doxycycline may not work as well if you take it with food or milk (or anything high in calcium - more details below ), so ask your doctor or pharmacist if you may take it that way. Do not lie down for at least 10 minutes after taking this medication. The dosage is based on your medical condition and response to treatment. For children, the dosage may also be based on weight.

    When using to prevent malaria, this medication is usually taken once daily. Take the first dose of this medication 1 to 2 days before travel or as directed by your doctor. Continue to take this medication daily while in the malarious area. Upon returning home, you should keep taking this medication for 4 more weeks. If you are unable to finish this course of doxycycline, contact your doctor.

    If you are using the liquid form of this medication, shake the bottle well before each dose. Carefully measure the dose using a special measuring device/spoon. Do not use a household spoon because you may not get the correct dose.

    For the best effect, take this antibiotic at evenly spaced times. To help you remember, take this medication at the same time(s) every day. Continue to take this medication until the full prescribed amount is finished, even if symptoms disappear after a few days. Stopping the medication too early may allow bacteria to continue to grow, which may result in a return of the infection.

  4. Doxycycline: Uses, side effects, dosage, warnings, and ...

    www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/326077

    Aug 16, 2019 · Doxycycline is an antibiotic that can treat various bacterial infections. People can use oral or injectable forms. Sometimes, doctors use doxycycline to treat lung, nose, and throat infections....

  5. Doxycycline vs. Tetracycline: Side Effects & Dosage for ...

    www.medicinenet.com/doxycycline_vs_tetracycline/...

    Doxycycline is a synthetic (man-made) antibiotic derived from tetracycline. Doxycycline is used for many different types of infections, including respiratory tract infections due to Hemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, or Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

  6. Treatments for Specific Types of Sexually Transmitted ...

    www.nichd.nih.gov/health/topics/stds/condition...

    Gonorrhea and chlamydia are bacterial STDs/STIs that can be treated with antibiotics given either orally or by injection. Because the infections often occur together, people who have one infection are typically treated for both by their health care provider. 1 Recent sexual partners should be treated at the same time.

  7. Vaccines for Sexually Transmitted Diseases | History of Vaccines

    www.historyofvaccines.org/content/articles/...
    • Treatment
    • Symptoms
    • Epidemiology
    • Prevention
    • Administration
    • Risks
    • Overview
    • Research
    • Causes
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    • Resources

    Some STDs, such as such as gonorrhea, Chlamydia, and syphilis, are caused by bacteria. They are usually effectively treated with antibiotics, although many patients do not know that they are infective and can spread the disease to other partners. The availability of treatments means that the need for vaccines against these diseases is not a top priority, although the increased resistance of gonorrhea to antibiotics may lead to a shift in priorities. Viral STDs are often highly persistent despite current therapeutic options or have no acceptable treatment available. Therefore, vaccines for certain viral STDs are in use, and others are in development.

    Most people who contract HPV have no symptoms, and they quickly clear the virus from their bodies. However, in other people certain types of HPV cause genital warts. Other HPV types are the main cause of cervical cancer, and some are associated with anal, penile, mouth, and throat cancers.

    HPV is very common: one recent study showed that nearly 27% of women aged 14-59 tested positive for one or more strains of HPV. Rates for men are likely to be similar. Mathematical models have shown that more than 80% of women will have been infected with genital HPV by the time they reach age 50.

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Gardasil (HPV4), a Merck vaccine for four types of HPV, in 2006. FDA approved another vaccine, Cervarix (HPV2) from GlaxoSmithKline, which protects against two types of HPV, in 2009. A nine-valent vaccine (HPV9, Gardasil 9) was approved in 2014. All HPV vaccines use just a protein from the shell of certain HPV types: they contain no viral RNA or DNA and so cannot cause disease or replicate in the body. Current U.S. recommendations and guidelines for HPV vaccination for females and males are below: The recommended age for HPV vaccination of females is 11-12 years. Vaccine can be administered as young as age 9 years. Catch-up vaccination is recommended for females aged 13-26 years who have not been previously vaccinated. ACIP recommends routine vaccination of males aged 11 or 12 years with HPV4 or HPV9 administered as a 3-dose series. The vaccination series can be started beginning at age 9 years. Vaccination with HPV4 or HPV9 is recommended for males aged 13 through 21 years who have not been vaccinated previously or who have not completed the 3-dose series. Males aged 22 through 26 years may be vaccinated. The FDA has licensed several hepatitis B vaccines for use in the United States. It has been part of the routine childhood immunization schedule since 1994. Following are the general recommendation for use of the vaccine: Hepatitis B vaccination is recommended for all children, starting at birth in a three-dose series spread over many months. Additionally, all children and adolescents under age 19 who have not been vaccinated are recommended to receive the vaccine, as are adult populations at risk of HBV infection. As much as it would be useful to have a highly effective herpes simplex vaccine, the current options are not likely to be broadly useful. Progress toward an HIV vaccine has been slow since the virus was isolated in 1983. Only three HIV vaccines have been tested in clinical efficacy trials. It is difficult to make a vaccine for HIV for several reasons:

    For all adolescents, the vaccine is given as a 2-dose series if the series is initiated before age 15. If the series is begun at age 15 or later, 3 doses of vaccine are given.

    The picture is different for children: infants and children who become infected with hepatitis B are much more likely than adults to become chronically infected.

    Genital herpes is a viral infection caused by herpes simplex viruses. Some infected people may have few or no symptoms of illness, but many others experience blisters and sores in the genital area. The infection can remain in the body indefinitely, and sores can recur again and again.

    Researchers have developed many experimental attenuated and inactivated herpes vaccines, starting in the 1930s and continuing through the 1970s, though none was effective enough to be approved and licensed. The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and pharmaceutical company GlaxoSmithKline co-sponsored a Phase 3 clinical trial of a candidate subunit herpes vaccine on nearly 8,000 women across the country. The vaccine had previously shown some promise in a certain subset of women. In September 2010, however, researchers reported that the Phase 3 trial failed to show that the vaccine was effective. Another herpes candidate vaccine, sponsored by Sanofi Pasteur, uses the whole virus and is in pre-clinical studies. To date, researchers have developed several candidate HIV vaccines, but none has performed well enough in clinical trials to be approved. Researchers have developed vaccines for two sexually transmitted diseases. Ongoing efforts to develop vaccines for herpes and HIV may prove successful in the future.

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is the agent that causes Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). HIV can be transmitted via sexual contact with an infected person. (HIV can also be transmitted by other kinds of contact with contaminated body fluids.)

    When a person first contracts HIV, he may have a mild to moderate illness with fever. After these symptoms subside, the virus persists in a stealth mode and causes slow damage to the immune system. Medications can keep people healthy for many years and perhaps even indefinitely. A person with HIV infection that has progressed to AIDS can also benefit from treatment with medicines. There can be a substantial restoration of immune function while the patient remains on active treatment. A person with AIDS has great difficulty fighting other diseases because of damage to the bodys disease-fighting white blood cells.

    CDC. Human Papillomavirus. Epidemiology and Prevention of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases. (463 KB). Atkinson, W., Wolfe, S., Hamborsky, J., McIntyre, L., eds. 13th ed. Washington DC: Public Health Foundation, 2015. Accessed 01/25/2018.

  8. A chlamydia vaccine shows signs of success in an early trial ...

    www.cnn.com/2019/08/13/health/chlamydia-vaccine...

    Aug 13, 2019 · Scientists have taken a step towards a vaccine for chlamydia following a successful early trial.. A vaccine developed by a British and Danish team was shown to be safe and effective during a ...

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