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  1. Doxycycline: antibiotic to treat bacterial infections - NHS

    www.nhs.uk › medicines › doxycycline
    • About doxycycline. Doxycycline is an antibiotic. It's used to treat infections such as chest infections, skin infections, rosacea, dental infections and sexually transmitted infections (STIs), as well as a lot of other rare infections.
    • Key facts. For most infections, you'll start to feel better in a few days but it is important to finish the course of medicine. The most common side effects of doxycycline are headaches, feeling or being sick.
    • Who can and can't take doxycycline. Doxycycline can be taken by adults and children over 12 years old. Doxycycline is not usually recommended in pregnancy or when breastfeeding.
    • How and when to take it. Your dose of doxycycline depends on why you are taking it. The usual dose is 100mg to 200mg once or twice a day. If you're taking doxycycline more than once a day, try to space your doses evenly throughout the day.
    • Preparation
    • Administration
    • Prevention
    • Risks
    • Treatment

    Read the Patient Information Leaflet if available from your pharmacist before you start taking doxycycline and each time you get a refill. If you have any questions, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

    This medication is best taken by mouth on an empty stomach, at least 1 hour before or 2 hours after a meal, usually 1 or 2 times daily or as directed by your doctor. Take this medication with a full glass of water (8 ounces/240 milliliters) unless directed otherwise. If stomach upset occurs, taking it with food or milk may help. However, doxycycline may not work as well if you take it with food or milk (or anything high in calcium - more details below ), so ask your doctor or pharmacist if you may take it that way. Do not lie down for at least 10 minutes after taking this medication. The dosage is based on your medical condition and response to treatment. For children, the dosage may also be based on weight.

    When using to prevent malaria, this medication is usually taken once daily. Take the first dose of this medication 1 to 2 days before travel or as directed by your doctor. Continue to take this medication daily while in the malarious area. Upon returning home, you should keep taking this medication for 4 more weeks. If you are unable to finish this course of doxycycline, contact your doctor.

    If you are using the liquid form of this medication, shake the bottle well before each dose. Carefully measure the dose using a special measuring device/spoon. Do not use a household spoon because you may not get the correct dose.

    For the best effect, take this antibiotic at evenly spaced times. To help you remember, take this medication at the same time(s) every day. Continue to take this medication until the full prescribed amount is finished, even if symptoms disappear after a few days. Stopping the medication too early may allow bacteria to continue to grow, which may result in a return of the infection.

  2. Doxycycline: Uses, side effects, dosage, warnings, and ...

    www.medicalnewstoday.com › articles › 326077

    Aug 16, 2019 · Doxycycline is an antibiotic that can treat various bacterial infections. People can use oral or injectable forms. Sometimes, doctors use doxycycline to treat lung, nose, and throat infections....

  3. Doxycycline (Oral Route) Proper Use - Mayo Clinic

    www.mayoclinic.org › proper-use › drg-20068229
    • Dosing
    • Missed Dose
    • Storage

    The dose of this medicine will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor's orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of this medicine. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so. The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the time allowed between doses, and the length of time you take the medicine depend on the medical problem for which you are using the medicine. 1. For oral dosage forms (capsules, suspension, syrup, tablets): 1.1. For infections: 1.1.1. Adults—100 milligrams (mg) every 12 hours on the first day, then 100 mg once a day or 50 to 100 mg every 12 hours. 1.1.2. Children 8 years of age or older weighing 45 kilograms (kg) or more—100 mg every 12 hours on the first day, then 100 mg once a day or 50 to 100 mg every 12 hours. 1.1.3. Children 8 years of age or older weighing less than 45 kg...

    If you miss a dose of this medicine, take it as soon as possible. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not double doses.

    Store the medicine in a closed container at room temperature, away from heat, moisture, and direct light. Keep from freezing. Keep out of the reach of children. Do not keep outdated medicine or medicine no longer needed. Ask your healthcare professional how you should dispose of any medicine you do not use. 1. Before Using 2. Precautions Portions of this document last updated: Feb. 01, 2021 Copyright © 2021 IBM Watson Health. All rights reserved. Information is for End User's use only and may not be sold, redistributed or otherwise used for commercial purposes.

  4. Most Common STDs, Pictures and Descriptions - PlushCare

    plushcare.com › blog › std-picture-description
    • STD Pictures and Descriptions. Sexually transmitted diseases, or STDs, are infections that are spread from one person to another during vaginal, anal, and oral intercourse.
    • Oral Herpes. Oral herpes is an infection also known as herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1). The virus is transmitted through oral secretions or sores on the skin, and can be spread through oral sex, kissing or sharing objects such as toothbrushes or eating utensils, during an outbreak.
    • Genital Herpes: Women. Genital herpes, mostly caused by herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) is widespread throughout the world. More women are infected than men however, the infection is more easily spread from men to women than from women to men.
    • Genital Herpes in Men. Approximately two-thirds of men with genital herpes, known as herpes simplex virus 2, do not experience symptoms. It is also common for mild genital herpes symptoms in men to be confused with other skin conditions.
  5. Doxycycline: MedlinePlus Drug Information

    medlineplus.gov › druginfo › meds
    • Medical uses
    • Administration
    • Preparation
    • Prevention
    • Treatment
    • Uses
    • Diet
    • Risks
    • Results
    • Interactions

    Doxycycline is used to treat infections caused by bacteria, including pneumonia and other respiratory tract infections; certain infections of the skin or eye; infections of the lymphatic, intestinal, genital, and urinary systems; and certain other infections that are spread by ticks, lice, mites, infected animals, or contaminated food and water. It is also used along with other medications to treat acne. Doxycycline is also used to treat or prevent anthrax (a serious infection that may be spread on purpose as part of a bioterror attack), in people who may have been exposed to anthrax in the air, and to treat plague and tuleramia (serious infections that may be spread on purpose as part of a bioterror attack). It is also used to prevent malaria. Doxycycline can also be used in people who cannot be treated with penicillin to treat certain types of food poisoning. Doxycycline (Oracea) is used only to treat pimples and bumps caused by rosacea (a skin disease that causes redness, flushing, and pimples on the face). Doxycycline is in a class of medications called tetracycline antibiotics. It works to treat infections by preventing the growth and spread of bacteria. It works to treat acne by killing the bacteria that infects pores and decreasing a certain natural oily substance that causes acne. It works to treat rosacea by decreasing the inflammation that causes this condition.

    Doxycycline comes as a capsule, delayed-release capsule, tablet, delayed-release tablet, and suspension (liquid) to take by mouth. Doxycycline is usually taken once or twice a day. Drink a full glass of water with each dose. If your stomach becomes upset when you take doxycycline, you may take it with food or milk. However, taking doxycycline with milk or food may decrease the amount of medication absorbed from your stomach. Talk with your doctor or pharmacist about the best way to take doxycycline. Follow the directions on your prescription label carefully, and ask your doctor or pharmacist to explain any part you do not understand. Take doxycycline exactly as directed. Do not take more or less of it or take it more often than prescribed by your doctor. Swallow the delayed-release tablets and the Acticlate CAP capsules whole; do not split, chew, or crush them.

    If you cannot swallow certain delayed-release tablets (Doryx; generics) whole, carefully break up the tablet and sprinkle the contents of the tablet on a spoonful of cold or room temperature (not hot) applesauce. Be careful not to crush or damage any of the pellets while you are breaking up the tablet. Eat the mixture right away and swallow without chewing. If the mixture cannot be eaten right away it should be discarded. Shake the suspension well before each use to mix the medication evenly.

    If you are taking doxycycline for the prevention of malaria, start taking it 1 or 2 days before traveling to an area where there is malaria. Continue taking doxycycline each day you are in the area, and for 4 weeks after leaving the area. You should not take doxycycline for the prevention of malaria for more than 4 months. Keep this medication in the container it came in, tightly closed, and out of reach of children. Store it at room temperature and away from light and excess heat and moisture (not in the bathroom). It is important to keep all medication out of sight and reach of children as many containers (such as weekly pill minders and those for eye drops, creams, patches, and inhalers) are not child-resistant and young children can open them easily. To protect young children from poisoning, always lock safety caps and immediately place the medication in a safe location one that is up and away and out of their sight and reach. http://www.upandaway.org Unneeded medications should be disposed of in special ways to ensure that pets, children, and other people cannot consume them. However, you should not flush this medication down the toilet. Instead, the best way to dispose of your medication is through a medicine take-back program. Talk to your pharmacist or contact your local garbage/recycling department to learn about take-back programs in your community. See the FDA's Safe Disposal of Medicines website (http://goo.gl/c4Rm4p) for more information if you do not have access to a take-back program.

    Continue to take doxycycline even if you feel well. Take all the medication until you are finished, unless your doctor tells you otherwise. One doxycycline product may not be able to be substituted for another. Be sure that you receive only the type of doxycycline that was prescribed by your doctor. Ask your pharmacist if you have any questions about the type of doxycycline you were given.

    Doxycycline may also be used for the treatment of malaria. It may also be used to treat Lyme disease or to prevent Lyme disease in certain people who have been bitten by a tick. It may also be used to prevent infection in people who were sexually attacked. Talk to your doctor about the possible risks of using this medication for your condition. This medication is sometimes prescribed for other uses; ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

    Unless your doctor tells you otherwise, continue your normal diet. Take the missed dose as soon as you remember it. However, if it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and continue your regular dosing schedule. Do not take a double dose to make up for a missed one.

    Doxycycline may cause other side effects. Call your doctor if you have any unusual problems while taking this medication. If you experience a serious side effect, you or your doctor may send a report to the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting program online (http://www.fda.gov/Safety/MedWatch) or by phone (1-800-332-1088).

    Keep all appointments with your doctor and laboratory. Your doctor will want to check your response to doxycycline.

    Before having any laboratory test, tell your doctor and the laboratory personnel that you are taking doxycycline.

  6. Amoxicillin vs. Doxycycline: Antibiotic Uses, Side Effects ...

    www.medicinenet.com › amoxicillin_amoxil_vs

    Amoxicillin and doxycycline are antibiotics used to treat bacterial infections of the respiratory tract and other infections. Amoxicillin is also used to treat bacterial infections of the middle ear, tonsils, throat, urinary tract, and skin. It also is used to treat gonorrhea.

  7. Weekly Dose: doxycycline treats a host of human plagues, but ...

    theconversation.com › weekly-dose-doxycycline
    • Mechanism
    • Uses
    • Development
    • Resistance
    • Side Effects and Reactions
    • Controversies
    • Possible Future Uses

    Doxycycline interferes with a microorganism’s ability to manufacture proteins – the “building blocks” of life. Protein manufacture occurs in a part of the cell called the “ribosome” and is fundamental to any organism’s survival. The reason doxycycline kills bacteria and parasites, but not our own cells, is that ours have a different type of ribosome to these simpler organisms.

    Because doxycycline kills a wide range of bacteria that can infect the respiratory system, it is commonly prescribed for pneumonia and bronchitis. It is also widely used for treating acne and infections of the urinary and genital systems. It is usually taken orally as tablets or capsules but can also very occasionally be given as an intravenous injection. Doxycycline continues to exert its effects for some time after being taken. This means it can be used not only as treatment, but also for prevention or “prophylaxis”. Its most widespread use as prophylaxis is for tourists and other travellers (such as military personnel) going to tropical countries where it is used to protect primarily against malaria. It may also provide additional protection from common bacterial causes of diarrhoea. To be effective in preventing infection, it needs to be taken once a day during the time the person is at risk. Doxycycline is also active against a number of bacteria that could possibly be used as...

    The development of doxycycline followed the momentous discovery of penicillin, a natural compound produced by a certain type of mould. This lead many pharmaceutical companies to investigate the microbe-killing properties of a large number of other natural products, such as those produced by other microorganisms and plants, a process termed “bio-discovery”. This unearthed natural compounds with anti-microbial activity and further synthetic modification improved these natural compounds.

    Like all antibiotics, doxycycline is susceptible to bugs that develop resistance. There is evidence this has already occurred in settings where the drug is widely used, such as treatment of acne. This means its use may be curtailed or overtaken by alternative drugs for some conditions, now or in the future.

    The most commonly reported side effect is inflammation of the oesophagus (food pipe), causing heartburn. This can be quite unpleasant but is somewhat preventable by taking the medication with plenty of water, while standing and well before going to bed. “Photosensitivity” (heightened sensitivity to sunlight resulting in being easily sunburnt) is also common ( in up to 20%of people taking it). This is especially problematic for travellers using it as malaria prophylaxis in tropical countries. Doxycycline should not be used in children or in pregnant women where it can result in permanent brown staining of teeth and have other effects on foetal bone development. Doxycycline can increase the toxicity of the anti-inflammatory drug methotrexate.

    Recent high-profile controversiesregarding side-effects from antimalarial drug mefloquine in defence-force personnel and refugees have highlighted the role of doxycycline as one of two main alternatives to mefloquine. It is now generally considered a preferable initial choice to mefloquine for malaria prophylaxis. Interestingly, previous studies suggest many people actually prefer taking mefloquineto doxycycline. This may reflect the nature of doxycycline’s side effects, but also its less convenient daily dosing (mefloquine is taken weekly).

    It has recently been founddoxycycline affects processes in human cells, especially a group of enzymes important for the body’s inflammatory response. This property may be beneficial and could lead to applications for treating various non-infectious conditions. These include cancers (especially those involving bone), inflammatory and autoimmune conditions (including rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis) and atherosclerotic diseases (plaque build-up in your arteries that can cause heart disease). However, these applications are currently still mostly in the experimental stage.

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