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  1. Lyme dis·ease

    /ˈlīm dəˌzēz/

    noun

    • 1. an inflammatory disease characterized at first by a rash, headache, fever, and chills, and later by possible arthritis and neurological and cardiac disorders, caused by bacteria that are transmitted by ticks.
  2. People also ask

    What is Lyme disease and can you die from it?

    What is Lyme disease and how can you prevent it?

    What are the dangers of Lyme disease?

    What happens when Lyme disease is left untreated?

  3. Dec 16, 2019 · Lyme disease is the most common vector-borne disease in the United States. Lyme disease is caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi and rarely, Borrelia mayonii. It is transmitted to humans through the bite of infected blacklegged ticks. Typical symptoms include fever, headache, fatigue, and a characteristic skin rash called erythema ...

  4. Lyme disease - Symptoms and causes - Mayo Clinic

    www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/lyme-disease
    • Overview
    • Symptoms
    • Causes
    • Risk Factors
    • Complications
    • Prevention

    Lyme disease is caused by four main species of bacteria. Borrelia burgdorferi and Borrelia mayonii cause Lyme disease in the United States, while Borrelia afzelii and Borrelia garinii are the leading causes in Europe and Asia. The most common tick-borne illness in these regions, Lyme disease is transmitted by the bite of an infected black-legged tick, commonly known as a deer tick.You're more likely to get Lyme disease if you live or spend time in grassy and heavily wooded areas where ticks c...

    The signs and symptoms of Lyme disease vary. They usually appear in stages, but the stages can overlap.

    In the United States, Lyme disease is caused by the bacteria Borrelia burgdorferi and Borrelia mayonii, carried primarily by black-legged or deer ticks. Young brown ticks often are no bigger than a poppy seed, which can make them nearly impossible to spot.To contract Lyme disease, an infected deer tick must bite you. The bacteria enter your skin through the bite and eventually make their way into your bloodstream.In most cases, to transmit Lyme disease, a deer tick must be attached for 36 to...

    Where you live or vacation can affect your chances of getting Lyme disease. So can your profession and the outdoor activities you enjoy. The most common risk factors for Lyme disease include: 1. Spending time in wooded or grassy areas. In the United States, deer ticks are found mostly in the heavily wooded areas of the Northeast and Midwest. Children who spend a lot of time outdoors in these regions are especially at risk. Adults with outdoor occupations also are at increased risk. 2. Having...

    Untreated Lyme disease can cause: 1. Chronic joint inflammation (Lyme arthritis), particularly of the knee 2. Neurological symptoms, such as facial palsy and neuropathy 3. Cognitive defects, such as impaired memory 4. Heart rhythm irregularities

    The best way to prevent Lyme disease is to avoid areas where deer ticks live, especially wooded, bushy areas with long grass. You can decrease your risk of getting Lyme disease with some simple precautions: 1. Cover up. When in wooded or grassy areas, wear shoes, long pants tucked into your socks, a long-sleeved shirt, a hat and gloves. Try to stick to trails and avoid walking through low bushes and long grass. Keep your dog on a leash. 2. Use insect repellents. Apply insect repellent with a...

  5. Lyme disease - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lyme_disease

    Lyme disease, also known as Lyme borreliosis, is an infectious disease caused by the Borrelia bacterium which is spread by ticks. The most common sign of infection is an expanding red rash, known as erythema migrans, that appears at the site of the tick bite about a week after it occurred.

  6. Lyme disease is caused by bacteria, Borrelia burgdorferi that are transmitted to humans through a bite from an infected black-legged or deer tick. Symptoms can occur anywhere from 3 to 30 days ...

  7. Lyme Disease: Symptoms, Treatment, and Prevention

    www.healthline.com/health/lyme-disease

    Lyme disease is an infectious disease caused by the bacteria Borrelia burgdorferi.B. burgdorferi is transmitted to humans by a bite from an infected black-legged or deer tick.The tick becomes ...

  8. Apr 13, 2020 · Untreated Lyme disease can produce a wide range of symptoms, depending on the stage of infection. These include fever, rash, facial paralysis, and arthritis. Early Signs and Symptoms (3 to 30 Days After Tick Bite)

  9. Lyme Disease: Rash, Tick Bites, Symptoms, Signs, Curable ...

    www.medicinenet.com/lyme_disease/article.htm

    Lyme disease is an illness that is spread by bites from ticks infected by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi, Borrelia mayonii, Borrelia afzelii, or Borrelia garinii.; Lyme disease can affect the skin, joints, heart, and the nervous system.

  10. Lyme disease - Diagnosis and treatment - Mayo Clinic

    www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/lyme...
    • Diagnosis
    • Treatment
    • Alternative Medicine
    • Preparing For Your Appointment

    Many signs and symptoms of Lyme disease are often found in other conditions, so diagnosis can be difficult. What's more, ticks that transmit Lyme disease can also spread other diseases.If you don't have the characteristic Lyme disease rash, your doctor might ask about your medical history, including whether you've been outdoors in the summer where Lyme disease is common, and do a physical exam.Lab tests to identify antibodies to the bacteria can help confirm or rule out the diagnosis. These t...

    Antibiotics are used to treat Lyme disease. In general, recovery will be quicker and more complete the sooner treatment begins.

    Antibiotics are the only proven treatment for Lyme disease. Some people who have unexplained signs and symptoms or chronic disease might believe they have Lyme disease even if it's not been diagnosed. There are a variety of alternative treatments that people with Lyme disease or people who think they have Lyme disease turn to for relief.Unfortunately, these treatments either haven't been proved effective by scientific evidence or haven't been tested. In many cases, they can be harmful, even d...

    You're likely to start by seeing your family doctor or a general practitioner who might refer you to a rheumatologist, infectious disease specialist or other specialist.Here's some information to help you get ready for you appointment.

  11. Lyme disease is caused by a spirochete called Borrelia ...

    www.lymedisease.org/lyme-basics/lyme-disease
    • Overview
    • Epidemiology
    • Results
    • Symptoms
    • Life cycle
    • Causes
    • Treatment
    • Risks

    Lyme disease is a bacterial infection primarily transmitted by Ixodes ticks, also known as deer ticks, and on the West Coast, black-legged ticks. These tiny arachnids are typically found in wooded and grassy areas. Although people may think of Lyme as an East Coast disease, it is found throughout the United States, as well as in more than sixty other countries.

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimate that 300,000 people are diagnosed with Lyme disease in the US every year. Thats 1.5 times the number of women diagnosed with breast cancer, and six times the number of people diagnosed with HIV/AIDS each year in the US. However, because diagnosing Lyme can be difficult, many people who actually have Lyme may be misdiagnosed with other conditions. Many experts believe the true number of cases is much higher. Lyme disease affects people of all ages. The CDC notes that it is most common in children, older adults, and others such as firefighters and park rangers who spend time in outdoor activities and have higher exposure to ticks. Lyme disease has been found on every continent except Antarctica. It is found all across the United States, with a particularly high incidence in the East, Midwest, and West Coast. Rates have increased significantly over time. Some of this increase may be because of disease spread, but it is also likely that it reflects growing public awareness of the disease. Not all ticks are infected. Within endemic areas, there is considerable variation in tick infection rates depending on the type of habitat, presence of wildlife and other factors. Tick infection rates can vary from 0% to more than 70% in the same area. This uncertainty about how many ticks are infected makes it hard to predict the risk of Lyme disease in a given region.

    LymeDisease.org has developed a Lyme disease symptom checklist to help you document your exposure to Lyme disease and common symptoms for your healthcare provider. You will receive a report that you can print out and take with you to your next doctors appointment.

    Patients with Lyme disease are frequently misdiagnosed with chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia, multiple sclerosis, and various psychiatric illnesses, including depression. Misdiagnosis with these other diseases may delay the correct diagnosis and treatment as the underlying infection progresses unchecked.

    Once a tick has attached, if undisturbed it may feed for several days. The longer it stays attached, the more likely it will transmit the Lyme and other pathogens into your bloodstream. Refer to tick section.

    If pregnant women are infected, they sometimes pass Lyme disease to their unborn children and, while not common, stillbirth has occurred. Some doctors believe other types of human-to-human transmission are possible but little is known for certain.

    In the South, a Lyme-like disease called STARI (Southern Tick-Associated Rash Illness) transmitted by the Lone Star tick has been described. Scientists are still debating about what organism(s) in the Lone Star tick may cause the disease as well as the treatment of patients with a rash in the South. However, Lyme disease has been reported in certain areas of the South and Southeast and patients with STARI may be quite ill. Because of this, patients in the South with a rash should be treated. (Herman-Giddens 2014)

    The risk of getting Lyme disease is often reflected in risk maps. Some maps show the number of human cases of Lyme disease reported for surveillance. These maps may not accurately reflect risk because only 10% of reportable Lyme cases are currently captured by CDC surveillance. Other risk maps show the number of infected ticks that researchers have collected in a certain area. These maps are often not accurate because many states and counties have done little or no testing of ticks in the area. The best maps of risk may be canine maps. This is because dogs are routinely screened for Lyme disease through a nationwide program as well as the close association of dogs with humans.

  12. Lyme Disease Symptoms, Warning Signs, & Risks

    www.webmd.com/arthritis/understanding-lyme...

    What Are the Symptoms of Lyme Disease? The first sign is usually a bull's-eye rash. You might also have flu-like feelings of fatigue, headache, fever, sore throat, chills, or body aches.