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  1. Moral relativism encompasses views and arguments that people in various cultures have held over several thousand years. For example, the ancient Jaina Anekantavada principle of Mahavira (c. 599–527 BC) states that truth and reality are perceived differently from diverse points of view, and that no single point of view is the complete truth; and the Greek philosopher Protagoras (c. 481–420 ...

  2. Answer (1 of 8): First consider the sentence “is it wrong to steal?”, and try to think of the quickest answer. Now, try answering “what is the nature of the word ‘wrong’” in the above sentence?

  3. Sep 11, 2015 · 4.5 Moral Relativism. Moral or ethical relativism is simultaneously the most influential and the most reviled of all relativistic positions. Supporters see it as a harbinger of tolerance (see §2.6), open-mindedness and anti-authoritarianism. Detractors think it undermines the very possibility of ethics and signals either confused thinking or ...

  4. Nov 17, 2010 · But there are considerable, and indeed meta­philosophical, differences between Husserl and his successors. The meta­philosophical differences can be unfolded from this: Heidegger, Sartre and Merleau-Ponty adhere to an ‘existential’ phenomenology. ‘Existential phenomenology’ has two senses. Each construal matters meta­philosophically.

  5. A second weakness of the double bind theory is that there are ethical issues. There are serious ethical concerns in blaming the family, particularly as there is little evidence upon which to base this. Gender bias is also an issue as the mother tends to be blamed the most, which means such research is highly socially sensitive.

  6. Dec 23, 2016 · This commitment is often cast in the terms of a normative agenda for science and social science: ontological realism, epistemic relativism, judgmental rationality, and a cautious ethical naturalism. Ontological Realism At the heart of critical realism is realism about ontology—an inquiry into the nature of things.

  7. en.wikipedia.org › wiki › MoralityMorality - Wikipedia

    An example of normative ethical philosophy is the Golden Rule, which states: "One should treat others as one would like others to treat oneself." [3] [4] Immorality is the active opposition to morality (i.e. opposition to that which is good or right), while amorality is variously defined as an unawareness of, indifference toward, or disbelief ...