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    • Rocky Mountain spotted fever - Wikipedia
      • Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is a bacterial disease spread by ticks. It typically begins with a fever and headache, which is followed a few days later with the development of a rash. The rash is generally made up of small spots of bleeding and starts on the wrists and ankles. Other symptoms may include muscle pains and vomiting.
      en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rocky_Mountain_spotted_fever#:~:text=Rocky%20Mountain%20spotted%20fever%20%28RMSF%29%20is%20a%20bacterial,Other%20symptoms%20may%20include%20muscle%20pains%20and%20vomiting.
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  2. Rocky Mountain spotted fever - Symptoms and causes - Mayo Clinic

    www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/rocky...
    • Overview
    • Symptoms
    • Causes
    • Risk Factors
    • Complications
    • Prevention

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever is a bacterial infection transmitted by a tick. Without prompt treatment, Rocky Mountain spotted fever can cause serious damage to internal organs, such as your kidneys and heart.Although it was first identified in the Rocky Mountains, Rocky Mountain spotted fever is most commonly found in the southeastern part of the United States. It also occurs in parts of Canada, Mexico, Central America and South America.Early signs and symptoms of Rocky Mountain spotted fever...

    Although many people become ill within the first week after infection, signs and symptoms may not appear for up to 14 days. Initial signs and symptoms of Rocky Mountain spotted fever often are nonspecific and can mimic those of other illnesses: 1. High fever 2. Chills 3. Severe headache 4. Muscle aches 5. Nausea and vomiting 6. Confusion or other neurological changes

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever is caused by infection with the organism Rickettsia rickettsii. Ticks carrying R. rickettsii are the most common source of infection.If an infected tick attaches itself to your skin and feeds on your blood for six to 10 hours, you may pick up the infection. But you may never see the tick on you.Rocky Mountain spotted fever primarily occurs when ticks are most active and during warm weather when people tend to spend more time outdoors. Rocky Mountain spotted fever...

    Factors that may increase your risk of contracting Rocky Mountain spotted fever include: 1. Living in an area where the disease is common 2. The time of year — infections are more common in the spring and early summer 3. How much time you spend in grassy or wooded areas 4. Whether you have a dog or spend time with dogsIf an infected tick attaches to your skin, you can contract Rocky Mountain spotted fever when you remove it, as fluid from the tick can enter your body through an opening such a...

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever damages the lining of your smallest blood vessels, causing the vessels to leak or form clots. This may cause: 1. Inflammation of the brain (encephalitis). In addition to severe headaches, Rocky Mountain spotted fever can cause inflammation of the brain, which can cause confusion, seizures and delirium. 2. Inflammation of the heart or lungs. Rocky Mountain spotted fever can cause inflammation in areas of the heart and lungs. This can lead to heart failure or lung f...

    You can decrease your chances of contracting Rocky Mountain spotted fever by taking some simple precautions: 1. Wear long pants and sleeves. When walking in wooded or grassy areas, wear shoes, long pants tucked into socks and long-sleeved shirts. Try to stick to trails and avoid walking through low bushes and long grass. 2. Use insect repellents. Products containing DEET (Off! Deep Woods, Repel) often repel ticks. Be sure to follow the instructions on the label. Clothing that has permethrin i...

  3. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever: Pictures and Long-Term Effects

    www.healthline.com/.../rocky-mountain-spotted-fever

    Aug 28, 2018 · Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is a bacterial infection spread by a bite from an infected tick. It causes vomiting, a sudden high fever around 102 or 103°F, headache, abdominal pain, rash, and...

    • Jacquelyn Cafasso
  4. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever Guide: Causes, Symptoms and ...

    www.drugs.com/.../rocky-mountain-spotted-fever.html
    • What Is It?
    • Symptoms
    • Diagnosis
    • Expected Duration
    • Prevention
    • Treatment
    • When to Call A Professional
    • Prognosis
    • Further Information

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever is a severe illness caused by tiny bacteria called Rickettsia rickettsii, which are transmitted through the bite of an infected tick. In the eastern United States and in California, the infected tick is usually Dermacentor variabilis, the American dog tick. In most of the western United States, the tick is more likely to be Dermacentor andersoni, the Rocky Mountain wood tick. Humans typically become infected in the spring and early summer. Once someone is bitten b...

    Typically, symptoms begin 2 to 14 days after a tick bite, with an average of 1 week. During the first 3 days of symptoms, an infected person usually has a fever of more than 102 degrees Fahrenheit and a severe headache. Muscle aches, nausea and vomiting are common. Between the 3rd and 5th day of fever, most people develop a rash, which usually begins on the wrists and ankles, then spreads to the arms, legs and trunk. In about two-thirds of patients, the rash also involves the palms of the han...

    The classic features that may lead your doctor to suspect Rocky Mountain spotted fever are high fever, rash, headache, and a history of tick exposure, such as walking in a tick-infested area, within 14 days of developing the symptoms of Rocky Mountain spotted fever. Only about 60% of patients recall being bitten by a tick. The early symptoms of Rocky Mountain spotted fever are not specific, and diagnostic tests often are negative early in the disease. Therefore, if your doctor suspects that y...

    Symptoms of Rocky Mountain spotted fever begin 2 to 14 days after a bite by an infected tick. Most cases of Rocky Mountain spotted fever respond to appropriate antibiotic treatment within a week. Once symptoms develop, a person can die within 2 weeks without proper treatment.

    Because there is no vaccine against Rocky Mountain spotted fever, the most effective way to prevent the illness is to avoid walking in wooded areas or fields where ticks are found. If you must walk in tick-infested areas, follow these precautions: 1. Wear light-colored clothing, which allows you to promptly identify a clinging tick. 2. Wear long-sleeved shirts and pants that are snug around the wrists and ankles. 3. While you are outdoors, check yourself for ticks every two hours. 4. Use an a...

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever is treated with one of the tetracycline drugs, usually doxycycline (sold as a generic), in adults and children over age 9. In general, tetracyclines should not be prescribed for pregnant women and children under the age of 9 because these antibiotics can permanently stain the teeth. However, doxycycline is the best available antibiotic to treat this potentially life threatening infection and is preferred if Rocky Mountain spotted fever is the likely diagnosis, des...

    Call your doctor immediately if you develop fever, headaches and nausea, with or without a rash, after you have been bitten by a tick. Even if you don't remember being bitten, call your doctor if you develop these symptoms and you have walked recently in tick-infested areas.

    Before effective antibiotics were available, 20% to 25% of people with Rocky Mountain spotted fever died. Now, however, only about 5% of patients die from this illness. Older patients have a slightly higher risk of death than younger ones, and males have a higher risk than females.

    Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.Medical Disclaimer

  5. Rocky Mountain spotted fever - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rocky_Mountain_spotted_fever

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever is a bacterial disease spread by ticks. It typically begins with a fever and headache, which is followed a few days later with the development of a rash. The rash is generally made up of small spots of bleeding and starts on the wrists and ankles. Other symptoms may include muscle pains and vomiting. Long-term complications following recovery may include hearing loss or loss of part of an arm or leg. The disease is caused by Rickettsia rickettsii, a type of bacterium

    • 2 to 14 days after infection
    • Early: Fever, headache, Later: Rash
  6. Treatment | Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (RMSF) | CDC

    www.cdc.gov/rmsf/treatment/index.html

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is a bacterial disease spread through the bite on an infected tick.

  7. Late stage rash in a patient with Rocky Mountain spotted fever. Rash is a common sign in people who are sick with RMSF. Rash usually develops 2-4 days after fever begins. The look of the rash can vary widely over the course of illness.

  8. MOUNTAIN FEVER IN THE 1847 MORMON PIONEER COMPANIES Jay A. Aldous

    mormonhistoricsites.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/NJ9.2...

    biology text by Jawetz, Melnick, and Adelberg have identified mountain fever as Colorado tick fever, which is caused by a virus mnsmitted by the Roclcy Momah wood tick (Demacenter andersoni).l4 Tick season begins with warm weather, but ticks may become less active when the temperature increases and humidity decreases.

  9. Valley Fever: Symptoms, Causes, Diagnosis, Treatment

    www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/valley-fever

    Valley fever’s symptoms start out much like those of the flu. But this illness comes from a fungus that lives in the soil, and a few cases are serious.

  10. Fever - Symptoms and causes - Mayo Clinic

    www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/fever/...
    • Overview
    • Symptoms
    • Causes
    • Complications
    • Prevention

    A fever is a temporary increase in your body temperature, often due to an illness. Having a fever is a sign that something out of the ordinary is going on in your body.For an adult, a fever may be uncomfortable, but usually isn't a cause for concern unless it reaches 103 F (39.4 C) or higher. For infants and toddlers, a slightly elevated temperature may indicate a serious infection.Fevers generally go away within a few days. A number of over-the-counter medications lower a fever, but sometime...

    You have a fever when your temperature rises above its normal range. What's normal for you may be a little higher or lower than the average normal temperature of 98.6 F (37 C).Depending on what's causing your fever, additional fever signs and symptoms may include: 1. Sweating 2. Chills and shivering 3. Headache 4. Muscle aches 5. Loss of appetite 6. Irritability 7. Dehydration 8. General weaknessChildren between the ages of 6 months and 5 years might experience febrile seizures. About a third...

    Fever occurs when an area in your brain called the hypothalamus (hi-poe-THAL-uh-muhs) — also known as your body's \\"thermostat\\" — shifts the set point of your normal body temperature upward. When this happens, you may feel chilled and add layers of clothing or wrap up in a blanket, or you may shiver to generate more body heat, eventually resulting in an elevated body temperature.Normal body temperature varies throughout the day — it's lower in the morning and higher in the late afternoon and e...

    Children between the ages of 6 months and 5 years may experience fever-induced convulsions (febrile seizures), which usually involve loss of consciousness and shaking of limbs on both sides of the body. Although alarming for parents, the vast majority of febrile seizures cause no lasting effects.If a seizure occurs: 1. Lay your child on his or her side or stomach on the floor or ground 2. Remove any sharp objects that are near your child 3. Loosen tight clothing 4. Hold your child to prevent...

    You may be able to prevent fevers by reducing exposure to infectious diseases. Here are some tips that can help: 1. Wash your hands often and teach your children to do the same, especially before eating, after using the toilet, after spending time in a crowd or around someone who's sick, after petting animals, and during travel on public transportation. 2. Show your children how to wash their hands thoroughly, covering both the front and back of each hand with soap and rinsing completely unde...

  11. Fever Facts: High Temperature Causes and Treatments

    www.webmd.com/first-aid/fevers-causes-symptoms...

    It’s also called a high temperature, hyperthermia, or pyrexia, and it’s usually a sign that your body is working to keep you healthy from an infection. Normal body temperatures are different ...

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