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  1. Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF)

    www.epa.gov/sites/production/files/2016-08/...

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) Symptoms: fever, rash, headache, thrombocytopenia, hyponatremia, elevated hepatic transaminases. Rapidly fatal if not treated within the first 5 days. Rash occurs in 80% of cases, but may occur late in illness. Never wait for a rash to begin treatment.

  2. Chronic rocky mountain spotted fever | General center ...

    ic.steadyhealth.com/chronic-rocky-mountain...

    Feb 28, 2017 · Chronic Rocky Mountain spotted fever. This disease is very serious and remains life threatening even today, when a lot of treatment options are available. Up to five percent of infected patients will die from this infection, even if they receive appropriate treatment. Antibiotic therapy has dramatically reduced the number of deaths.

  3. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever - NORD (National Organization ...

    rarediseases.org/.../rocky-mountain-spotted-fever

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is considered the most potentially severe form of the spotted fevers. The onset of symptoms typically occurs approximately two to 14 days (with an average of seven days) after having been bitten by a tick carrying the R. rickettsii bacterium.

  4. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever: See Photos of the Rash

    www.onhealth.com/.../1/rocky_mountain_spotted_fever

    Jul 27, 2016 · Treatment for Rocky Mountain spotted fever includes a tetracycline (Achromycin) antibiotic, usually doxycycline (Vibramycin). This is taken per doctor's instructions until several days after the fever goes away and the patient starts to show signs of improvement.

  5. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever vs Lyme Disease - Differences ...

    www.yourhealthremedy.com/health-tips/rocky...

    May 01, 2020 · Rocky Mountain spotted fever is a bacterial infection that is transmitted by a tick. The states which are most usually affected are Oklahoma, Arkansas, North Carolina, Missouri, and Tennessee. The symptoms develop within the first few days of a tick bite, but, some people may not experience symptoms for up to 14 days.

  6. Otitis Media (with Effusion) - Symptoms - Treatment ...

    familydoctor.org/condition/otitis-media-with...

    Aug 06, 2018 · Treatment. If your child is older than 6 months of age and only has mild symptoms, the best treatment is to let the fluid go away on its own. You can give your child an over-the-counter pain reliever, such as acetaminophen, (one brand: Children’s Tylenol) if he or she is uncomfortable. A warm, moist cloth placed over the ear may also help.

  7. Fever | Johns Hopkins Medicine

    www.hopkinsmedicine.org/.../fever

    How is a fever treated? You can treat a fever with acetaminophen or ibuprofen in dosages advised by your healthcare provider. Switching between giving acetaminophen and ibuprofen can cause medicine errors and may lead to side effects. Never give aspirin to a child or young adult who has a fever. A lukewarm bath may reduce the fever.

  8. Fever and Rash - Infectious Disease Advisor

    www.infectiousdiseaseadvisor.com/.../fever-and-rash

    The most common infectious diseases with fever and rash are transmitted by vector: Typhus, rickettsial spotted fever, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, Lyme disease, ehrlichiosis, and tularemia. Immunocompromised patients are most susceptible to herpes-virus dissemination, ecthyma gangrenosum, Streptococcal, and Staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome.

  9. When Is a Fever Dangerous? High Fever Warning Signs | UPMC

    share.upmc.com/2016/10/fever-treatment-guidelines

    Oct 07, 2016 · Adults with a fever higher than 105 degrees F or a fever over 103 degrees F that rises or lasts longer than 48 hours; In addition, you should seek medical care if you have a fever accompanied by rash and bruising, difficulty breathing, and/or pain while urinating.

  10. Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID) | NIH: National ...

    www.niaid.nih.gov/diseases-conditions/severe...

    Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is a group of rare disorders caused by mutations in different genes involved in the development and function of infection-fighting immune cells. Infants with SCID appear healthy at birth but are highly susceptible to severe infections. The condition is fatal, usually within the first year or two of life, unless infants receive immune-restoring treatments ...