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  1. How to Treat Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever in Dogs

    www.thesprucepets.com/rocky-mountain-spotted...

    Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (RMSF) is a serious disease that can affect dogs of all ages, sizes, and breeds. Spread through tick bites, this infection causes a variety of symptoms in dogs and is seen all over the country. Dog owners should be aware of how to not only recognize this disease but also how to prevent it.

  2. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever in Dogs | PetMD

    www.petmd.com/.../c_dg_rocky_mountain_spotted_fever

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever is one of the most commonly known tick-borne diseases to affect dogs and humans. It belongs to a class of diseases known as Rickettsia; rod-shaped microorganisms that resemble bacteria, but which behave like viruses, reproducing only inside living cells.

  3. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever in Dogs - Great Pet Care

    www.greatpetcare.com/dog-health/rocky-mountain...

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever is a tick-borne bacterial infection. Caused by the American dog tick, Rocky Mountain wood tick, and Lone Star tick. This disease is difficult to diagnose, since symptoms are highly variable. Catching and treating the disease early is key to a good prognosis.

  4. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever In Dogs: Symptoms, Causes ...

    dogtime.com/dog-health/56635-rocky-mountain...

    Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever in dogs is a disease caused by the parasitic bacteria Rickettsia rickettsi that is transmitted through the saliva and blood of ticks. The bacteria lives most of its life inside host rodents and doesn’t make the animal sick,...

  5. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever in Dogs: Signs, Causes ...

    aetapet.com/rocky-mountain-spotted-fever-dogs

    Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever in Dogs. Rocky Mountain spotted fever is one of the most commonly understood tick-borne illness to impact dogs and human beings. It comes from a class of illness referred to as Rickettsia; rod-shaped microorganisms that resemble bacteria, however which behave like viruses, reproducing only within living cells.

  6. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever in Dogs | VCA Animal Hospital

    vcahospitals.com/know-your-pet/rocky-mountain...

    In dogs, the signs of Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever can be vague and non-specific. Typically, a dog that has become infected with Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever may have one or more of the following clinical signs: poor appetite, non-specific muscle or joint pain, fever, coughing, abdominal pain, vomiting, diarrhea, swelling of the face or legs, or depression.

  7. It’s Tick Season! Beware of Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever in Dogs

    www.rainbowbridgehospicecare.com/dog-diseases/...

    Apr 27, 2018 · Rocky Mountain spotted fever is a bacterial disease that is spread through the bite of a tick infected with the disease. It was first discovered in the Rocky Mountains of the United States, hence the name. It is one of the most common tick-borne diseases that affect dogs and humans.

  8. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever in Dogs - VetInfo

    www.vetinfo.com/rocky-mountain-spotted-fever-in...

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever is a tick-borne disease that affects both dogs and humans. It can cause serious and permanent damage to the nervous system. It can cause serious and permanent damage to the nervous system.

  9. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever in Dogs - Symptoms, Causes ...

    wagwalking.com/.../rocky-mountain-spotted-fever

    Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (RMSF) is a disease capable of infecting both humans and dogs. This disease, caused by the bacterium Rickettsia rickettsii, is primarily spread through the bite of an infected tick, most commonly the American Dog Tick and the Rocky Mountain Wood Tick.

  10. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever in Dogs - PetCareRx

    www.petcarerx.com/article/rocky-mountain-spotted...

    In the United States, Rocky Mountain spotted fever is carried by certain species of tick: the American dog tick, the Rocky Mountain wood tick, and the brown dog tick. Despite its name, ticks carrying the disease do not only live in the Rocky Mountains; in fact, today the area accounts for only a small percentage of cases.

    • Meredith Allen.